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The Courts

+ - PirateBay lose court case, founders go to jail->

Submitted by
Barence
Barence writes "The Pirate Bay has lost its landmark court case against US entertainment companies including Sony, Columbia Pictures, Warner Bros and EMI. The founders of the site, Peter Sunde Kolmisoppi, Fredrik Neij, Carl Lundstrom and Gottfrid Svartholm Warg, have been sentenced to a year in prison each, and hit with a $3.6 million fine. Kolmisoppi dismissed the case as "theatre for the media" in a Twitter update earlier today, and claimed that "nothing will happen to TPB, us personally or file sharing whatsoever." He also announced a leak of the verdict on Twitter before the court handed down its judgement: "Really, it's a bit LOL. It used to be only movies, now even verdicts are out before the official release.""
Link to Original Source
Communications

+ - Pirate Bay loses trial, says co-founder->

Submitted by
CNETNate
CNETNate writes "Peter Sunde, one of the co-founders of The Pirate Bay, has broken news that the Bay has lost its high-profile court case. Earlier this morning Sunde, who goes by the online alias Brokep, posted a message to Twitter, claiming a trustworthy source had leaked the court's verdict to him. The official verdict is expected later today."
Link to Original Source
Communications

Sprint's Xohm WiMax Network Debuts In Baltimore, Works Well 86

Posted by timothy
from the will-it-reach-the-double-t-diner? dept.
bsk_cw writes "Sprint's newly launched Xohm service is now offering America's first WiMax network. Computerworld's Brian Nadel went to Baltimore to try it out, and he reports that Xohm delivered data smoothly to a car moving at highway speeds, played YouTube videos flawlessly, and on average, pushed through more than 3Mbit/sec., compared with 1.3 Mbit/sec. for the AT&T network Brian used as a comparison. But right now, coverage is only planned in a few US cities; if Sprint isn't able to ramp up its coverage quickly, it may lose its advantage."
The Internet

Berners-Lee Speaks Out Against DRM, Advocates Net Neutrality 187

Posted by Zonk
from the papa-don't-speak-i'm-in-trouble dept.
narramissic writes "Speaking before the House Subcommittee on Telecommunications and the Internet, Tim Berners-Lee advocated for net neutrality, saying that the Web deserves 'special treatment' as a communications medium to protect its nondiscriminatory approach to content. Berners-Lee's more controversial statements came on the topic of DRM, in which he suggested that instead of DRM, copyright holders should provide information on how to legally use online material, allowing users the opportunity 'to do the right thing.' This led to an odd exchange with Representative Mary Bono who compared Berner-Lee's suggestion to 'having a speed limit but not enforcing the speed limit.'"
The Almighty Buck

+ - Biggest computing disaster ever

Submitted by
xiox
xiox writes "Private Eye magazine contains a comprehensive report detailing the horrifying background to the wasting of £12.4 billion of public money on an unnecessary and useless central bureaucratic computer system for the UK's National Health Service. This could have paid for 26,000 doctors over 10 years. While the full report is not available online, NHS Blog Doctor details some of the findings.

Those of us working within the NHS have long been aware of the futility and waste of this IT system. The details that emerge from the Private Eye report reveal a tale of incompetence and greed that beggars belief. Incompetence on the part of the government, and greed on the part of some of the contractors, two of whom are named by the report. Both made personal profits of over £20 million on the back of inflated share sales and illusory profits generated by Enron style accounting.
"
Businesses

Comparison of Working at the 3 Big Search Giants 179

Posted by Zonk
from the searching-for-some-free-sushi dept.
castironwok writes "Finally, everything you've ever wanted to know about being an employee at Google, Microsoft, and Yahoo. Tastyresearch describes his (or her) past few years interning and working at the three companies. Things I didn't know from before: Bill Gates wears old shoes, Google's internal security watches you like a hawk, the office styles of each company, and how to fill your suitcase with Google T-shirts. He calls the few select companies the 'prestigious internship circle', noting 'once you have worked at one, it's a lot easier to get into another'."
Databases

+ - Is Delphi the next Database dev platform.. again?

Submitted by santakrooz
santakrooz (517854) writes "Delphi's always been known as a solid database application development platform, it just had it's 12th birthday on Valentines day, and now the Delphi guys are coming up with a completely new database architecture. The interesting thing is that it's backward compatible, insanely extensible, single sourced between .NET and Wintel native code, and... and written completely in Delphi. Ok I know Delphi's written in Delphi and there are "wow" apps out there written in Delphi like Skype that Delphi guys always like to mention, there was a loosely supported Linux version, so my question is, what can't you do in Delphi? Or a better question is... what have Slashdot readers written in Delphi?"
Data Storage

+ - Nenest Web Application Framework

Submitted by
Tony Y.
Tony Y. writes "Nenest (http://www.nenest.com) is a web platform which enables anyone to create online software support databases. Users use Nenest Form Builder to create online forms, then use those form to collect, organize and store data. Those data can be secure for internal employees or members accessing only; or published to public by using social networking tools, including RSS feeds, Digg, del.icio.us and Sphere."
Software

+ - BSD Stackable Filesystem Series I

Submitted by
jasonrfink00
jasonrfink00 writes "Nice beginning article of a promising BSD series: The nullfs filesystem is a passthrough filesystem. When nullfs is mounted it — literally copies the filesystem transaction. If a file is deleted, nullfs simply transmits the information down to the lower filesystem. Conversely, if a file is created, it does the same and tacks on all of the data needed for the filesystem underneath. Why is that a good thing? Where did nullfs come from and why?. What else, if anything, is it good for? The series focuses on where nullfs comes from, how it can be leveraged, a code walk and a skeloten implementation (nearly a blind copy). link."
Software

+ - Estimating custom software development cost

Submitted by GL82
GL82 (1040642) writes "As a student studying CS right now, we came across the subject of estimating software development cost. Out of curiosity, what kind of methods (eg. function points, use case points, COCOMO, and others) do you or your company used to estimate the cost required to develop the software for your clients (after you have complete a fairly comphrensive specification)? My question is directed toward custom software development, but methods for development of software product is also welcome. Also, how well does your method works? If you found out later that your number are way far, then what techniques do you use when re-negotiating with your clients about the pricing or scope of the projects?"

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