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US Secretary of State Calls Climate Change 'Weapon of Mass Destruction' 401

Hugh Pickens DOT Com writes "Arshad Mohammed reports on Reuters from Jakarta that US Secretary of State John Kerry warned Indonesians that man-made climate change could threaten their entire way of life, deriding those who doubted the existence of 'perhaps the world's most fearsome weapon of mass destruction' and describing those who do not accept that human activity causes global warming as 'shoddy scientists' and 'extreme ideologues'. 'Because of climate change, it's no secret that today Indonesia is ... one of the most vulnerable countries on Earth. It's not an exaggeration to say that the entire way of life that you live and love is at risk,' said Kerry. 'In a sense, climate change can now be considered another weapon of mass destruction, perhaps even the world's most fearsome weapon of mass destruction.' In Beijing on Friday, Kerry announced that China and the United States had agreed to intensify information-sharing and policy discussions on their plans to limit greenhouse gas emissions after 2020. At home, Kerry faces a politically tricky decision on whether to allow the Keystone XL pipeline after a State Department report played down the impact the Keystone pipeline would have on climate change. However Kerry showed little patience for skeptics in his speech. 'We just don't have time to let a few loud interest groups hijack the climate conversation,' said Kerry. 'I'm talking about big companies that like it the way it is, that don't want to change, and spend a lot of money to keep you and me and everybody from doing what we know we need to do.'"

Submission + - Whatever happened to the IPv4 address crisis? (

alphadogg writes: In February 2011, the global Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) allocated the last blocks of IPv4 address space to the five regional Internet registries. At the time, experts warned that within months all available IPv4 addresses in the world would be distributed to ISPs. Soon after that, unless everyone upgraded to IPv6, the world would be facing a crisis that would hamper Internet connectivity for everyone. That crisis would be exacerbated by the skyrocketing demand for IP addresses due to a variety of factors: the Internet of Things (refrigerators needing their own IP address); wearables (watches and glasses demanding connectivity); BYOD (the explosion of mobile devices allowed to connect to the corporate network); and the increase in smartphone use in developing countries. So, here we are three years later and the American Registry for Internet Numbers is still doling out IPv4 addresses in the United States and Canada. Whatever happened to the IPv4 address crisis?

Submission + - What "news for nerds" sites should I use? 8

stderr_dk writes: I used to visit Slashdot quite often, but if Dice Holdings decide to switch the interface to what is currently known as "Beta", I'll have to find another site for my "stuff that matters"-fix.

So, Slashdot, what sites can you recommend for a "maybe-ex" /. user?

Submission + - Report: Valve anti-cheat scans your DNS history (

dotarray writes: Valve is looking at your browsing history right now, if a recent report is to be believed. It seems that the company's Valve Anti Cheat system (VAC) reportedly looks at all the domains you have visited, and if it finds that you've frequented hack sites, you'll be banned without question.

Submission + - Foxconn Building Factories In Indonesia (

jfruh writes: Chinese electronics manufacturing giant Foxconn is building factories in Indonesia, and upon hearing the news you might be tempted to think the company is simply moving into labor markets where it can find cheaper employees. But in fact, the Indonesian factories will specifically produce smartphones and computers for Indonesians; the country has almost as many people as the United States, but smartphone penetration there remains low.

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Can some of us get together and rebuild this community? 21

wbr1 writes: It seems abundantly clear now that Dice and the SlashBeta designers do not care one whit about the community here. They do not care about rolling in crapware into sourceforge installers. In short, the only thing that talks to them is money and stupid ideas.

Granted, it takes cash to run sites like these, but they were fine before. The question is, do some of you here want to band together, get whatever is available of slashcode and rebuild this community somewhere else? We can try to make it as it once was, a haven of geeky knowledge and frosty piss, delivered free of charge in a clean community moderated format.

Submission + - Alternatives to Slashdot post beta? 8

An anonymous reader writes: Like many Slashdotters, I intend to stop visiting Slashdot after the beta changeover. After years of steady decline in the quality of discussions here, the beta will be the last straw. What sites alternative to Slashdot have others found? The best I have found has been, but it has been a while since I've looked for tech discussion sites.

Submission + - Square planning to launch in Australia (

An anonymous reader writes: Square, the mobile payments company started by Twitter co-founder Jack Dorsey has begun preparations to launch in Australia, according to sources with knowledge of the plans.

Submission + - Start-up purchases controversial cold fusion E-cat technology (

Paul Fernhout writes: A North Carolina based company called Industrial Heat LLC has come out and admitted that it now owns Andrea Rossi’s ecat low energy nuclear reaction (LENR) technology (also sometimes called "cold fusion"). Industrial Heat has put out a press release in which seems to confirm rumors that it had spent $11 million to purchase Rossi’s device. The press release also confirmed speculation that Tom Darden of Cherokee Investment Partners a North Carolina equity fund is a principal investor in Industrial heat.

Submission + - Making rare metal by mixing the two metals on both sides of the periodic table ( 1

wingwatcher writes: Prof. Hiroshi Kitagawa in Kyoto Univ made artificial Rhodium (45) by mixing Ruthenium (44) and Palladium (46). The price of artificial Rhodium is US $4-14 per gram, and the price of natural Rhodium is US $40 per gram. Kitagawa said "It was a simple idea. We want to make other rare metals by the same way". This is alchemy.

20,000 Customers Have Pre-Ordered Over $2,000,000 of Soylent 543

Daniel_Stuckey writes "Less than a year ago, Rob Rhinehart published a blog post explaining how he had stopped eating food and begun living entirely on a greyish, macro-nutritious cocktail. Today, he told Motherboard that he's sold more than $2 million worth of Soylent to tens of thousands of post-food consumers worldwide—and that it's on track to ship next month. 'We have crossed $2,000,000 in revenue from over 20,000 customers, with more every day,' Rhinehart told me. 'International demand is really picking up as well.' This despite the fact that Soylent isn't technically on the market yet, and has thus far only been available to beta testers. Rhinehart's company spent much of last year tinkering with the formula—the version he tried first was deficient in sulfur, and contained since-jettisoned ingredients like cow whey. But there's been a steadily building crescendo of publicity—both positive and negative—around the project since its inception."

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: The fairness of "Public lynching", youtube style (

Taco Cowboy writes: A 28-year old woman confronted her former middle-school teacher, accusing her (the teacher) of sexual abuse, and the alleged victim posted the episode on youtube.

The police has since been involved as soon as the video gone viral.

I gotta wonder about the fairness of these types of accusatory public disclosure, especially over social media tool such as youtube.

A lot of hysteria has been whipped up along with the youtube video revelation. What is not discussed, however, is a possibility that such episode might have been arisen due to old grudges, or even with malicious intend.

What is your feeling about such kind of "publicity stunt" ?

Submission + - Maryland Police have their eye on you.

MouseTheLuckyDog writes: Forgive the blatent politicalness of the link. [1]

Reading this particular story caused s chill go down my spine,. and I think it will send chills down the spine. of many slashdot readers.

A Florida man was pulled over driving through Delaware last Christmas. He was asked where his gun is. This was outside the presence of his wife.He said he left it at home. His wife was asked and said she did not know. The cop told the man that he was lying and detained the family for a couple of hours.

Now comes the chilling part. How did the police know he owned a gun?

The simple answer is that they probably didn't know, what they knew was that he had a conceal carry weapons (CCW) permit in Florida. Florida does not give other states access to it's CCW database. So apparently Maryland is mining databases for CCW holders.

Of course another thought that will send a chill down spine. What other things are they mining for? What other states are mining databases?

A final aspect of this story. As you drive through Maryland, Maryland has automated license plate scanners. When your plate is scanned, MD's database is scanned for suspicious individuals.

So people watch out Maryland is watching you.

[1] Though that does not stop other slashdot members.

Submission + - Target credit card data was sent to server in Russia (

angry tapir writes: The stolen credit card numbers of millions of Target shoppers took an international trip — to Russia. A peek inside the malicious software that infected Target's POS (point-of-sale) terminals is revealing more detail about the methods of the attackers as security researchers investigate one of the most devastating data breaches in history. Findings from two security companies show the attackers breached Target's network and stayed undetected for more than two weeks. Over two weeks, the malware collected 11GB of data from Target's POS terminals. The data was first quietly moved to another server on Target's network and then transmitted in chunks to a U.S.-based server that the attackers had hijacked. Logs from that compromised server show the data was moved again to a server based in Russia starting on Dec. 2.

Submission + - Global Warming Is Thawing Out the Frozen Corpses of a Forgotten WWI Battle (

Daniel_Stuckey writes: In what is quite possibly the most bizarre result of global warming yet, a melting glacier in the Northern-Italian Alps is slowly revealing the corpses of soldiers who died in the First World War. After nearly a century, the frozen bodies appear to be perfectly mummified from the ice. With the remains also comes the story of the highest battle in history—‘The White War’.

The year is May 1915. The newly unified Italy decides to join the Allied Forces in the First World War, which by then is 10 months underway. Italy, eager to expand its borders, decides to wage war against Austria in an effort to annex the mountain areas of Trentino and Southern Tirol. The conflict results in what is now known as ‘The White War’: a cold, four-year-long standoff between Italian mountain troops, named ‘the Alpini’, and their Austrian opponents, ‘the Kaiserschützen’. The battle was fought at high altitude, with special weapons and infrastructure like ice-trenches and cable transports. Often the sides would use mortar fire to try and incur avalanches—‘the white death’—on each other’s camps, claiming thousands of lives.

Make it right before you make it faster.