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Education

Ask Slashdot: Statistical Analysis Packages For Libraries? 146

Posted by samzenpus
from the we-know-what-you-read-last-summer dept.
HolyLime writes "I'm a librarian in a small academic library. Increasingly the administration is asking our department to collect data on various aspects of our activities, class taught, students helped, circulation, collection development, and so on. This is generating a large stream of data that is making it difficult, and time consuming, to qualitatively analyze. For anything complicated, I currently use excel, or an analogous spreadsheet program. I am aware of statistical analysis programs, like SPSS or SAS. Can anyone give me recommendations for statistical analysis programs? I also place emphasis on anything that is open source and easy to implement since it will allow me to bypass the convoluted purchase approval process."
Space

First Full Science Results From Herschel 22

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the moon-is-made-of-ham dept.
davecl writes "Today the first full science results from the Herschel Space Observatory were released, including results ranging from the formation and evolution of galaxies to the detailed physics of star formation. Details can be found from The European Space Agency, the BBC, and the Herschel mission blog that I help maintain. Briefer reports, covering rather more of the science, can also be found under the #eslab2010 hashtag on Twitter."

Comment: Re:I'm not holding my breath... (Score 4, Insightful) 58

by bwcarty (#26125793) Attached to: MIT Injects Nanotubes To Help Fight Cancer

If you get a cancer that you can and do survive, you'll probably have lifelong health problems as a result, as much from the treatment as the cancer itself, and you won't ever really be completely cured.

As a cancer survivor going on five years now, I wouldn't necessarily say others should expect health problems as the result of their treatment. The chemo I went through was cardiotoxic, but if you're smart and dedicated, you can mitigate the risk for long term problems.

I've become a fairly avid runner in the past few years as a way of keeping my heart strong. The last time I went in for a checkup, my bp was a very good 112/67, and I have better cardio conditioning than ever. I'll need it since I'm going to be running a marathon in a little over 3 months.

That said, here's my plug for charitiable donations to the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. Every bit helps! Chemo and radiation suck; help fund the research towards curing blood cancers! :)

Businesses

Disillusioned With IT? 1027

Posted by kdawson
from the buy-the-red-convertible dept.
cgh4be writes "I have been working in the IT industry for about 12 years and have had various jobs as a consultant and systems engineer. Over that time I've had the chance to do a little bit of everything: programming, networking, SAN, Linux/AIX/UNIX, Windows, sales, support, and on and on. However, over the last couple of months I have become a little disillusioned with the IT industry as a whole. Occasionally, I will get interested in some new technology, but for the most part I'm starting to find it all very tedious, repetitive, and boring and I'm no longer really interested in the hands-on aspect of the business. I suppose going the management route is one option, but I would still be dealing with a lot of the same frustrating technology issues. The other route I had in mind was a complete career change; take something I really enjoy doing outside of work now and try to make a career out of it. The only problem is that I have a wife and kid to support and my current job pays very well. Have any of you been through this kind of career 'mid-life crisis?' What did you do to get out of the rut? Is making a complete career change at this point a bad idea?"
Portables

Walter Bender Resigns From OLPC 126

Posted by timothy
from the shiny-but-not-an-ass dept.
westlake writes "Walter Bender, the former executive director of MIT's Media Lab, and, in many ways, the tireless workhorse and public face of OLPC, has resigned from OLPC after being reorganized and sidetracked into insignificance. The rumor mill would have it that 'constructionism as children [learn] learning' is being replaced by a much less romantic view of the XO's place in the classroom and XO's tech in the marketplace."
Security

'Friendly' Worms Could Spread Software Fixes 306

Posted by Zonk
from the perfect-way-to-make-a-rogue-ai dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Microsoft researchers are working out the perfect strategies for worms to spread through networks. Their goal is to distribute software patches and other friendly information via virus, reducing load on servers. This raises the prospect of worm races — deploying a whitehat worm to spread a fix faster than a new attacking worm can reach vulnerable machines."
Republicans

Best Presidential Candidate, Republicans 1481

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the since-you-can't-build-robo-reagan dept.
A few days ago we posted a story for you to discuss the best presidential candidates for Super Tuesday, but I figured it would be an interesting idea to try that again, but split the discussion into 2 halves. This is the Republican half — please only discuss the Republican candidates in this story. Huckabee, McCain, and Romney only.

Comment: Re:Geekgasm (Score 2, Funny) 395

by bwcarty (#22237062) Attached to: A Mythbuster's Biggest Tech Headaches (and Solutions)

Jamie's the one who tries NOT to get hurt on the show, of course.


Of course, when he does get hurt, it looks more painful than Adam's frequent miscues. That shot he gave himself when cutting the line to his handheld grappling hook winch was rough...it almost ranks up there with Adam putting his lips in the vacuum motor.
Privacy

Interpol Unscrambles Doctored Photo In Manhunt 370

Posted by kdawson
from the blur-schmlur dept.
jackpot777 writes in with an AP story out of Paris reporting that Interpol has distributed photos of a man suspected of sexually exploiting children. The images were recovered from pictures taken off the Internet in which the man's face had been blurred using something like Photoshop's Filter > Distort > Twirl tool. German police were able to recover recognizable images of the man, whose identity and nationality are not known. Interpol would not discuss the techniques used to recover the images. jackpot777 writes: "It does show one interesting facet of internet privacy that has also been noted with topics ranging from reading blurred check numbers in images to Google's plan to blur out license plate and face data for Street View. And that is: blurring is not the same as completely obscuring. As computers become more adept at extrapolating data of different types, your identity isn't safe unless you completely cover all those identifying features."
Linux

Beryl User Interface for Linux Reviewed 271

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the yo-ho-ho-and-a-beryl-of-rum dept.
techie writes "OSWeekly.com has published a review of Beryl, a very cool looking UI for Linux. Matt Hartley writes, "This release, in my opinion, was the most over-hyped and bug-filled to date. You will have to really hit Technorati to see more of what I'm talking about, but Feisty is as buggy as the beta I tested a short time ago. After completely tossing into the wilds of the ubber-buggy "network-manager," anything running with Edgy supported RT2500 driver shows up, but it will not connect without a special script. Those of you who are on Feisty and need help with your RT2500 cards are welcome to e-mail me for the bash script."
Space

+ - Tatooine's Double-Sunset a Common Site

Submitted by anthemaniac
anthemaniac (989824) writes "Thirty years ago, Luke Skywalker saw what scientists are just now realizing, that double sunsets are likely common in the universe. Astronomers have long known that binary star systems are common. And models suggested that planets could form in these systems, even though there's a double-tug of gravity on the material that would have to form a planet. Observations from NASA's Spitzer telescope, show that binary systems are just as likely to be surrounded by planet-forming debris disks are are lone stars."
Space

+ - Hexagon shape at Saturn pole

Submitted by kiick
kiick (102190) writes "Cassini images of Saturn's north pole reveal a strange hexagon shape. Apparently it's stable, and has been there since the Voyager missions. An Article from JPL has images and movies of the phenomenon. They don't know what causes it.

I think it's Monoliths."

I cannot conceive that anybody will require multiplications at the rate of 40,000 or even 4,000 per hour ... -- F. H. Wales (1936)

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