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Comment: Re:BLUE ray (Score 2) 164

by pavon (#48470487) Attached to: Jackie Chan Discs Help Boost Solar Panel Efficiency

If you look at the absorption and efficiency plots in the linked nature abstract, the improvement is pretty broad spectrum as it is. Based on the Fourier analysis plots, it does seem like a slightly wider pit spacing would better concentrate the energy in their desired sweet spot, but CDs and DVDs would be too wide. HD-DVD actually looks like it might have the most ideal pit spacings.

Comment: Re:BLUE ray (Score 4, Insightful) 164

by pavon (#48470359) Attached to: Jackie Chan Discs Help Boost Solar Panel Efficiency

Now that they have a proof of concept, it is an obvious thing for researchers to try different pit sizes and patterns in order to optimize the efficiency

Actually, that already happened. As the abstract of the paper notes, previous research has already identified how to theoretically optimize patterns, but arbitrary patterns require expensive photo lithography equipment to create. This research shows that an existing inexpensive mass production technique generates results that are almost as good as the optimized patterns, but not quite as good because the spacing of the pits is a bit too periodic (especially across tracks rather than along them).

Comment: Re: Not quite true (Score 1) 306

by Zeinfeld (#48430745) Attached to: UK Hotel Adds Hefty Charge For Bad Reviews Online

Whether the term is enforceable or not is debatable and almost certain to be rendered moot. Unlike US Republicans, UK Conservatives do actually believe in the rule of law and honest business practices (sort of). There isn't any party who believes that screwing the consumer is a constitutional right. There will be a bill passed.

A rather more direct question is whether the hotelier was entitled to collect the charge under the credit card agreement. And that is unambiguous, he isn't. A credit card merchant cannot use a charge card to recover a disputed charge. It does not matter what the purported contract term was or if it is enforceable. The credit card agreements are designed to prevent cardholders from dishonest merchants. So the consumer will get their refund and the hotelier will find themselves facing a 30 quid chargeback fee.

The only option for the hotelier to recover would be to take the matter to court. The most he could win is the hundred pounds, if he lost he would likely be out the legal costs which could be a couple of thousand. Small claims courts don't usually award costs but they might well do so in this case. Judges tend to detest bullies.

Comment: Re: Ask the credit card for a refund (Score 1) 306

by Zeinfeld (#48430547) Attached to: UK Hotel Adds Hefty Charge For Bad Reviews Online

Its more than that, without regulation you end up with a lemon-law market.

Lots of times the difference between an honest product and a dishonest one only becomes apparent years later. If the product is safety equipment you only find out if the hard hat works when someone drops the brick on your head.

The libertarian theory that self interest will drive people to make honest products has turned out to be utterly false. In fact it turns out to be quite difficult for a company that intends to do the right thing to do so. I once had to get a guy fired after I found he had goosed his response rates for customer support calls by deliberately setting the phone tree up as a maze.

People do all sorts of idiotic short sighted stuff. This hotelier for example got his pants in a twist over a bad review and now he has probably sunk his business completely.

Rational choice is not an empirical fact of human behavior. It is a modelling assumption that tends to give good results in certain cases. But it does not hold for corporations because the interests of the corporation are not identical to those of the employees. All those banks who go belly up because the traders get big rewards for raking in profits and face no consequences for a loss. I don't gamble with my own money but if you want to give me $100,000 to gamble with I am happy to take it to Vegas, find a roulette wheel and let you take 100% of any losses and 90% of any gains.

Comment: Re:Been over this too (Score 1) 332

by David Jao (#48384691) Attached to: Denmark Plans To Be Coal-Free In 10 Years
Yes, we certainly have been over this. All the windmills in the world amount to 4% of worldwide electricity output. How much more can we get? Not every place with people has year-round wind. So you need serious investment in transmission and storage, areas which are currently already strained under existing load. Can it be done? Unproven.

Comment: Solution VS Victory (Score 1) 405

by backtick (#48380895) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: How To Unblock Email From My Comcast-Hosted Server?

If you don't care to 'win' the fight w/ comcast, then go get a budget ($1/month) VPS running CentOS like from somewhere cheap like Crissic or Ramnode and use it to route your outbound email. It'll cost you less in actual dollars than your time investment in fighting comcast to date at minimum wage or that you'll spend reading the comments on this 'ask me anything' I figure :)

Just an option!

Comment: Re:That's even worse! (Score 1) 332

by David Jao (#48380595) Attached to: Denmark Plans To Be Coal-Free In 10 Years
We've been over this. Cordemais produces at most 22.8 TWh per year assuming year-round 100% production with zero downtime. The 2006 report, page 9, exact same table, lists 60.5 TWh of coal-based production for the year 2006. Do I need to belabor the obvious and point out that 22.8 is less than 60.5? Cordemais alone does not produce more power than what the report claims for coal power stations. Give it up already, you're just flat-out wrong.

Comment: Re: Compromise combos don't work (Score 1) 219

by David Jao (#48377085) Attached to: Microsoft Losing the School Markets To iPads and Chromebooks
I think you vastly overestimate how many x86 apps can be rebuilt. Even Intel itself has to go to absurd lengths to engineer bug-for-bug binary compatibility into successive generations of x86 chips, precisely because it's so hard to get the industry to recompile. People always complain about Linux because it lacks Photoshop ... well, where is Photoshop for ARM? You speak of servers; where is Oracle's database software for ARM?

It's also not clear if Intel can succeed in making x86 chips save power. At least they're really trying now, which is more than they were doing before. But all that x86 instruction set baggage really bites them. It's something they can ignore in the server arena, but low-power is a different beast. Now I'm not saying they can't do it; Intel has great people and they do great things when they really try. But it will be hard.

Comment: Re: Compromise combos don't work (Score 1) 219

by David Jao (#48376355) Attached to: Microsoft Losing the School Markets To iPads and Chromebooks
The only problem is that Windows RT is doomed. Windows is far too dependent on x86 compatibility. If it can't run existing legacy Windows programs, then for most people there's no point. Without backward compatibility, you'll have to switch over to completely new software anyway, and by that point for the vast majority of people an iPad is a more attractive proposition.

Comment: Re: Nonsense (Score 1) 219

by David Jao (#48376335) Attached to: Microsoft Losing the School Markets To iPads and Chromebooks
I'll go one further. The real cost is not licensing, and it is not CALs. Everyone knows the real cost is LIABILITY. Horror stories abound of BSA licensing audits gone amok. Funny how Microsoft's Total Cost of Ownership studies always ignore the cost of license compliance, and always ignore the risk of multi-million dollar BSA penalties for even the most minor infractions.

I avoid all non-free software from BSA member organizations. If the BSA comes knocking, they get the door slammed on them until they come back with a court-issued warrant.

Comment: Re: So numerology trumps reality? (Score 1) 332

by David Jao (#48376289) Attached to: Denmark Plans To Be Coal-Free In 10 Years
Worthless? Blatant lie. Where did I say wind was worthless? Quote me please.

You will fail. I never said wind was worthless. Even a computer could do this. Hint: Ctrl-F.

I never even said anything that could be interpreted as equivalent to saying wind was worthless. Again, if you think otherwise, quote me. Go ahead.

Wind power today is 4% of global electricity production. This amount is worthwhile, but NOT A COMPLETE SOLUTION, and whether or not wind can go much beyond present production remains unproven. What part of this complex sentence do you not understand?

Comment: Re:That's even worse! (Score 1) 332

by David Jao (#48376273) Attached to: Denmark Plans To Be Coal-Free In 10 Years
The 2006 report says exactly what I said it says, and you know full well that it does.

Since you can read French, I direct your attention to page 9 from the 2006 report.

Production totale brute d’électricité (2006): 450.2 TWh (Nucléaire)
Total: 574.5 TWh

In percentage terms: 78.4%

Stop it with the outright falsehoods. I am right.

Whoever dies with the most toys wins.

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