Please create an account to participate in the Slashdot moderation system


Forgot your password?
Slashdot Deals: Deal of the Day - Pay What You Want for the Learn to Code Bundle, includes AngularJS, Python, HTML5, Ruby, and more. ×

Comment dear national security personnel: (Score 5, Insightful) 259

do your fucking job. spying on suspects

not hoovering everything from everyone and thinking a search query will give you magic intelligence. intelligence work is *work*

the encryption is not important. your gumshoe work is. get out of your fucking cubicle you lardass and find these dirtbags

and if you can't do that maybe your useless security theatre job should be axed

Comment Re:It is obvious that support most be provided... (Score 4) 125

If MS put real effort into providing good security [...]

You're bitching about an OS with mandatory access controls, DEP, ASLR, virtualized filesystem access, application whitelists, secure boot, and that runs its own authentication daemon in a VM so that not even the kernel itself can directly manage password hashes. You're doing this bitching in an article about a tool they maintain so you can harden and sandbox third-party programs, even when those programs weren't built with stack smashing or ASLR or all those neat Visual Studio canaries in mind.

[...]it would destroy the lucrative market for anti-malware software.

They bundle anti-malware software with the OS. They're, clearly, very concerned about not destroying all that filthy McAfee lucre.

Comment Re:illogical summary (Score 2) 360

There's no proof, and the "Global Competitiveness" crap in TFA is irrelevant to the millions of Japanese SMEs, because they are not competing globally.

Japan is on the edge of a demographics crisis. 25% of their population is over 65, compared with 59% that work. Having only ~2.36 people paying into public healthcare and social insurance for each person drawing out is not a good ratio, and with their notoriously low birth rates, is only going to worsen as time goes on.

In the meanwhile, Japan's racking up shittons of debt, and has to import nearly all of their energy.

So, what does this mean? It means productivity is really fucking important. If your aging population has fewer than 2 workers to cover each retiree, those workers better be really fucking productive or those healthcare costs are going to be an incredible burden. If you need to import 94% of your energy at great expense, you better put that energy to really fucking good use--i.e., be productive--or otherwise you're spending everything on coal and petrodollars instead of your own people. If your government debt is skyrocketing, but has fewer and fewer taxpayers to pay it down, those people better be really fucking productive or you're not going to have a government.

That latter point is especially important. Japan can get away with its debt load because of Japan's famously high savings rate--lots of people (or banks using people's savings) buying savings bonds means you can issue those bonds really cheaply. But, when people retire, they by necessity stop saving and start drawing on their savings instead. The government has double their yearly income in what's essentially an adjustable-rate mortgage, and the interest rates are going to skyrocket right as fewer people are there to pay it down.

Comment Re:No, the code-of-conduct will not harm go (Score 1) 358

If you don't know what constitutes respectful behavior, then maybe you weren't brought up right. I don't mean you specifically, of course.

(I know not how to quote here...)

The problem with that, is that 'respectful behavior' is a constantly moving target. What is respectful in one culture, may not be in another. Or to another person.

Do we target the most restrictive interpretation? One of my neighbors is a devout Muslim. I do things all the time that he considers disrespectful.

Or what if we're talking about people with disabilities...and what if I say something like, "I don't really care about accessibility on this..." is that disrespectful to the disabled? Probably. Even if I meant, "I need to get this done, and we can clean up accessibility later" my comment would be disrespectful, and possibly get me booted.

Respectful is wayyy too subjective.

Comment Re:No, the code-of-conduct will not harm go (Score 1) 358

There are a lot of people (like me) who will pretty much see these rules as a challenge. Eventually I will do something stupid...just because. And if that gets me banned for life, then I am screwed.

I would avoid it completely.

On the other hand, if I can lend a hand to someone, I absolutely will. If I can do something to make things better for other people...I will. But if you put down rules that essentially pre-judge me, I will purposely do something to piss you off.

It's the same as giving a middle finger to the man. Sometimes you just gotta do it. And if that gets you banned for life...then fuck them.

Sure, they do NOT need me. I realize that. And, I will make sure that I do NOT need them. I would never put myself in the position where people will judge my actions (more than my intentions) and decide I can't be part of their group. At least I will make sure I never need to rely on that group.

Comment Re:How embarrassing (Score 1) 157

He's right though. We spend much more per person on healthcare than even the yuuros do, and we die sooner despite that (fig 1). That's not to say that our hospitals are bad (though some states really fail at not killing people), or that we aren't awesomely good at treating specific diseases, but none of that means you'll live any longer than the slackers across the pond.

Even worse, despite being a nominally private healthcare system, our government still spends more per person than even the UK (fig 3). As in, we'd have less government in medicine if we went full-retard universal care.

That's not to say I'm a fan of single payor systems--our nanny state is already trying to micromanage how many ounces are in a soda even when they're not paying for your fat ass. But, it's simply wrong to say that the single-payor systems don't provide better care for less money.

That said, I'd much rather we emulate Singapore. They make you pay for everything out of pocket from a savings account drawn off your paycheck. Paying cash for everything keeps prices in check, the mandatory contributions mean no one's "uninsured," and no insurer or HMO limits what you can buy. Subsidies help the truly indigent, and you can draw on it like a 401(k) in your dotage should you prove unusually resilient.

The Little Red Dot lets you be as much of a fat-ass as you care to pay for, and ain't that the American way. Japan, in the meanwhile, has an honest-to-God fat tax.

Comment Re:Pretty standard procedure on a large campus (Score 1) 284

I'm glad I'm not the first one to say this. The on-site medical can triage, determine what is needed, and if necessary get EMS dispatched to the correct door with someone waiting to direct them in.

The article did make it clear that the on-site medical staff were sometimes insufficient.

You don't know if a person on the floor hit their head on something, passed out from exhaustion or low blood sugar, or (worst case) having a cardiac emergency. Rest and a candy bar doesn't require the waste of EMS resources. A bumped head can be a low priority dispatch.

When I worked in a warehouse, we had one front door. Easy, right? Not really. The warehouse was huge, with loading docks with truck bays and doors across the entire rear of the building. More than likely, the fastest route out was through the back. Telling EMS "go to the back of the building" could have wasted a lot of time trying to find *where* to be.

I found out the hard way that the "nurse" who worked the medical clinic on the night shift at my warehouse was untrained. I got a nasty gash on my hand, and I was bleeding a lot. I got a paper towel, applied pressure, got to my manager and then the clinic. The "nurse" bandaged it. The bandaging looked more like I was holding a gauze covered softball, which put no pressure on the wound. She offered to call EMS because I needed stitches. I couldn't afford the time off.

I took the bandage back off, and taught her how to do it properly. I didn't have a lot of training before that, but it was enough to properly bandage a wound (among other things). She appreciated the instruction. So I learned the "nurse" was just "someone to sit in the medical room for compliance purposes". I had to work late that day to make up for the time I spent in the clinic. They counted it as an unscheduled break. Bastards.

Comment Re:Do it yourself, here is why... (Score 1) 193

You raise a good point, but constantly fixing someone else's computer problems is draining, especially if the help is one-way and never reciprocated. It does nobody's relationship any good if you dread every call for the hour it's going to take to fix whatever broke.

Imagine instead if their computers actually worked, and you could therefore instead talk about whatever you wanted instead of why the printer isn't working. "Spending time with your child" is one thing, but I'm welcome to visit even when the Internet isn't broken; and, when visiting, I'd rather spend the time with them instead of their computer. Likewise, my folks are welcome to visit me even when I don't have a busted clutch slave cylinder or leaking fuel tank; and, likewise, the time is better spent on discretionary projects we want to tackle for the purposes of fun and/or bonding as opposed to helping with an emergency.

Comment Make Things Easier (Score 1) 193

I have no idea what you can expect from big box phone support, or if "good" phone support even exists. There are a bunch of things you can do to make tech support easier, however, if you haven't done them already.

  1. The best thing you can do (again, if you haven't already) is take away the Administrator account. I used to get weekly calls about my grandparents' PC, which saw a lot of use by relatives and grandchildren, until I did that. Suddenly, all the toolbars, viruses, Bonzi Buddies, random driver issues, and how-does-that-even-break issues just stopped. The occasional call to go type in the password and install something was much quicker than the frequent calls to uninstall something added by a well-meaning uncle or a young cousin.

    Yes, some people were angry that they couldn't install things any more. But, they didn't want to take the support phone calls, so they didn't get the admin password. Everyone else was happy that the communal PC was suddenly much more likely to work when they wanted to check e-mail or play Facebook games.

  2. Install Team Viewer. It's free for non-commercial use. When they call you with a problem, you tell them to click the big Team Viewer icon on the desktop and give you the code. Then you remote in and fix whatever broke--and the set of breakable things is much smaller on a limited account than on an admin.
  3. If you still have issues, purchase a copy of Faronics Deep Freeze--absent a password, it prevents any changes to the file system outside of certain allowed areas, like My Documents and the rest of the user profile. When I was an IT monkey, we used this in our computer labs, and it worked great--people could install whatever they wanted, delete whatever they wanted, vandalize the Windows install in whatever way they could think of, and it'd all be gone with a reboot.
  4. If you have more hardware issues ("the printer stopped working"), think about getting new hardware. I have a Phaser 6125N, for example, which is overkill for most anything, really, but toner lasts forever and the drivers are completely free of crapware--you just plug in an Ethernet cable and forget about it. If their printer frequently causes issues, weigh the cost of a newer, more enterprise-y printer with the time saved by not having to fuck with it every week.

    Ditto for modems, routers, whatever. If you have to walk them through rebooting their router every week, weigh the cost of a more reliable router over the time saved helping them turn it off and back on again.

  5. Finally, work on your phone support. If you ask someone if the network cable is plugged in, they'll always say "yes," especially if they're a professor too proud to crawl underneath his desk and check for a lowly IT monkey.

    Instead, ask them if it's plugged in the right way, because Ethernet cables are directional, you see. Make them flip it around (which, coincidentally, verifies a solid connection at both the wall and the PC). If that fixed the issue, they'll forever believe that Ethernet cables actually are directional, but it'll save you the trip to push a cable that last 1/8" into the jack.

    This is necessary because most people--even family--are loathe to actually check e.g. what color some lights are, especially if checking involves some modicum of effort. While most people won't outright lie, they'll give you whatever they think is correct, or whatever answer sounds good off the top of their head, which is especially easy to do for yes/no questions.

    So, never ask "is it plugged in"--the answer's always "yes," because of COURSE they plugged it in they're not an idiot and checking is effort. Ask them to switch the cable around. Don't ask if the lights are on--ask what color they are. Don't ask them to reboot their computer--ask them if their computer makes a noise when they hold the power switch for ten seconds.

...But, yanking admin accounts by itself solved nearly all of my tech support issues, and the few that remained were easily and gladly fixed with a few minutes on Team Viewer. If you can reduce your support burden to a combined total of an hour per year, I don't think you'd mind in-sourcing it again.

Comment there should be many easy fail safes (Score 1) 97

input or output from any part of the system should conform to narrow parameters, or the entire communication is disregarded, and the fail safe implemented. so falling back to the fail safe should be frequent, not rare and alarming. it could be a hack, it could also just be network or equipment issues, either way

for example, the data: distance to car in front of you

the data should be of rigorously correct format, received in the correct and expected small time frame, and the source must be locked to certain trust indicators (which would be another entire laundry list of overlapping qualifications)

if there is any failure, no matter how slight, the data should be considered tainted and incorrect, and back up redundant systems (lidar, whatever) or even fail over to manual control should be implemented

Comment Re:Drunks don't make the best decisions (Score 1) 327

because you drink and drive and don't think it's a problem

this makes you a fucking piece of shit

not a baseless insult, but objectively speaking: your irresponsibility is dangerous to the people you share the road with. by your choice. it's not your culture, asswipe, that's a lame dodge. you're just an immature irresponsible asshole who will kill someone, and seems happy about it

The shortest distance between two points is under construction. -- Noelie Alito