Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:News at eleven. (Score 2) 126

by buruonbrails (#35290702) Attached to: The Psychology of Horror In Video Games and Movies
Then why were public executions (often preceded by torture) so popular throughout Ancient, Medieval and even Early Modern times? Surely, not everyone attended them, but similarly not everyone enjoys watching horror movies now.
I suppose that some people are just more violent than others.
Image

Genghis Khan, History's Greenest Conqueror 279

Posted by samzenpus
from the taking-the-good-with-the-bad dept.
New research suggests that in addition to being one of history's cruelest conquerors, Genghis Khan may have been the greenest. It is estimated that the Mongol leader's invasions unintentionally scrubbed almost 700 million tons of carbon from the atmosphere. From the article: "Over the course of the century and a half run of the Mongol Empire, about 22 percent of the world's total land area had been conquered and an estimated 40 million people were slaughtered by the horse-driven, bow-wielding hordes. Depopulation over such a large swathe of land meant that countless numbers of cultivated fields eventually returned to forests. In other words, one effect of Genghis Khan's unrelenting invasion was widespread reforestation, and the re-growth of those forests meant that more carbon could be absorbed from the atmosphere." I guess everyone has their good points.

Comment: Re:Correction (Score 1) 305

by buruonbrails (#34479546) Attached to: Gamers Abandoning DS, PSP In Favor of Smartphones
I know some former PC gamers who turned to smartphone games. Actually, I'm one of them. I wouldn't even consider consoles as an alternative to PC gaming, but smartphone games are another story. PC games market is largily dominated by a few big players, who release big titles for broad audience to maximize their ROI. Naturally, their games are developed for the lowest common denominator. However, in smartphone game dev there's still a place for indie developers, who can afford to develop a game they'd play themselves, sell it for a small niche and still be profitable.
Not all of smartphone games are timewasters (well, no more than any other computer games); there are even some complex RPGs, like Zenonia for iPhone. While not as deep as the legendary Fallout, it is still much more of an RPG than many "RPG"s, released for PC nowadays.

Comment: Re:money money money (Score 2, Interesting) 122

by buruonbrails (#34472482) Attached to: The New Reality of Gaming
The funny thing is, most "social games" developers prefer playing FPS, strategies or RPGs themselves, but design their social games as dumbed down as possible, so that they're accessible by the stupid masses. Why? Cause that's where the money is.
I didn't believe the statistics until I developed a couple of social games as a side projects. The most profitable players are mid-aged women. This holds true even for games where the vast majority (over 80%) of active players are male. It's not uncommon for a mid-aged woman to spend ridiculous amounts of money on a social game, so that she can click the shiny buttons all week long. I still don't know the reason of this phenomenon. Maybe, they have a lot of free time and rich husbands...
Image

Medieval Copy Protection 226

Posted by samzenpus
from the thou-shall-write-your-own-book dept.
An anonymous reader writes "In medieval times a 'book curse' was often included on the inside cover or on the last leaf of a manuscripts, warning away anyone who might do the book some harm. Here's a particularly pretty one from Yale's Beinecke MS 214: 'In the name of the Father and the Son and the Holy Spirit, Amen. In the one thousand two hundred twenty-ninth year from the incarnation of our Lord, Peter, of all monks the least significant, gave this book to the [Benedictine monastery of the] most blessed martyr, St. Quentin. If anyone should steal it, let him know that on the Day of Judgment the most sainted martyr himself will be the accuser against him before the face of our Lord Jesus Christ.'"

Comment: Totalitarianism is not always bad (Score 0) 368

by buruonbrails (#31597034) Attached to: Sergey Brin On Google and China
Unfortunately for Google, totalitarian systems are very effective under some circumstances. For example, totalitarianism proved to be the most effective system during large-scaled wars and other dire conditions. Today's growth of Chinese GDP proves that it is more effective in current economical situation than either US or EU.
Don't forget, during the last twenty centuries, China had the largest economy on Earth for 18 centuries, and it always was totalitarian. Like it or not, it will soon regain its position as the largest economy on the planet. So, under the circumstances, it is Google who needs China to stay relevant in future, not vice-versa.

Comment: Re:Still not convinced about e-ink (Score 5, Insightful) 219

by buruonbrails (#31484868) Attached to: Color E-Book Displays Coming From E Ink Next Year
Just read from E-Ink screen to feel the difference. I was skeptical about E-Ink too before having tried it out. It looks almost exactly like the real paper. So, now I can't imagine using LCD for prolonged reading when you can use E-Ink device or (even better!) good old paper book.

By the way, another key advantage of E-Ink is energy consumption: it doesn't use battery when static, and uses quite a small amount of energy to redraw the page. Due to this feature, eBooks can run for weeks or even months on a single charge.

You might have mail.

Working...