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Comment: yo (Score 1) 349

by buddyglass (#47773253) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: What To Do About Repeated Internet Overbilling?
The fact that they are consistently 14% higher than your measured usage should have tipped you off that they're not just making numbers up, but measuring some sort of overhead you're not privy to. You're not ever going to get them to bill you like you want to be billed, since whatever they're doing is something they're doing for all their customers. I doubt their systems are set up to allow automatic scaling of certain users' bandwidth by some factor (e.g. 0.85). So if you can't live with the extra 14% I suggest moving to another network provider.

Comment: Re:Bullshit. Women do not want it. (Score 1) 329

by buddyglass (#47753537) Attached to: ACM Blames the PC For Driving Women Away From Computer Science
You seem to be focusing on the "men are different" argument. For sake of argument, I'll grant you that. It may be that women will never make up 50% of software developers and engineers. But, as you admit, we can try to modify the social / cultural landscape in such a way as to maximize women's interest in these fields. Whether or not that's a wise thing to do is a separate argument, but the prevailing wisdom is that maximizing the % of the population (both male in female) in "innovation-driving" professions increases overall prosperity.

Two things I'd point out: first, that women's interest in these fields has not always been at the current (low) level. Second, that women's interest in these fields is higher (than the U.S. level) in certain other countries. It may be that the female interest level in those countries is the highest we can possibly hope for given the (alleged) cognitive differences between men and women. But even if that's the case, there's still room to improve in the U.S. I'll recommend this academic paper out of Carnegie Melon. Table 13-1 is interesting.

Comment: Re:WTF (Score 1) 329

by buddyglass (#47747963) Attached to: ACM Blames the PC For Driving Women Away From Computer Science
The global reputation of U.S. tech may have been damaged by the NSA debacle, but only at the margins. Plenty of people still using Gmail, Facebook, buying Oracle crap, etc. Plus "Tech" is more than cloud services and software. Tesla, for instance. Get more people into STEM and maybe you get more Teslas. Or whatever other science/engineering success story you care to cite if you don't consider Tesla to be a good example.

Comment: Re:Bullshit. Women do not want it. (Score 1) 329

by buddyglass (#47747943) Attached to: ACM Blames the PC For Driving Women Away From Computer Science

You are not listening to me.

And you're not listening to me. Maybe if I used all caps instead? I acknowledge that men and women, at the aggregate level, have different interest. I'll even cede that they may be partly due to physiology. Will you cede that they may be partly due to social factors and that those social factors may in fact be mutable?

Comment: Re:Bullshit. Women do not want it. (Score 1) 329

by buddyglass (#47746681) Attached to: ACM Blames the PC For Driving Women Away From Computer Science
My job in software dev. is plenty interactive. And you're arguing against something I haven't said. Perceptions of fields can and have changed, leading to people's preferences changing. If perception change can be brought about intentionally then, from the standpoint of national competitiveness, maybe it's something we should consider.

Comment: Re:The problem, as always... (Score 2) 329

by buddyglass (#47746645) Attached to: ACM Blames the PC For Driving Women Away From Computer Science
In other words the change is explained by something other than biology. That makes my point. To your explanation, though, I'm not convinced that C.S. was relatively less discriminatory than other fields in 1984 that have since become less discriminatory and caused C.S. to lose its relative advantage. We'd need to look at which fields the women who would have been academically suited to study C.S. in 1984 are now entering at higher rates than they did in 1984.

Comment: Re:We don't know (Score 1) 329

by buddyglass (#47745661) Attached to: ACM Blames the PC For Driving Women Away From Computer Science
I KNOW WHY... BECAUSE WOMEN WON'T PUT IN THE WORK

Speaking purely anecdotally, all the women I've worked with in software development have been above average in terms of how hard they work. Some of them have been very competent; some (very much) less so. But none of them were slackers.

Comment: Re:WTF (Score 1) 329

by buddyglass (#47745649) Attached to: ACM Blames the PC For Driving Women Away From Computer Science
A larger and stronger STEM workforce is seen, rightly or wrongly, to be a driver of economic growth in a way plumbers and truckers aren't. The thinking is that if we had more people interested in and capable of being successful in STEM careers that it would increase everyone's prosperity. Better to be a nation of engineers and programmers than a nation of plumbers and truckers, the theory goes. To that end, if women are "turned off" by STEM and choose to pursue other careers and if that can be changed then, in theory, changing that perception and getting more women into the field would be a good thing from the point of view of making the U.S. more globally competitive.

Lawyers and non-research doctors are basically overhead. You need them for society to function at an acceptably high level, but they don't really drive innovation. For that you need STEM guys and some management glue to organize them and turn the innovative vision into reality. More STEM guys (and/or gals) = more innovation = greater national prosperity.

Comment: Re:Bullshit. Women do not want it. (Score 1) 329

by buddyglass (#47745627) Attached to: ACM Blames the PC For Driving Women Away From Computer Science
That it's the result of preferences and not overt discrimination doesn't necessarily argue against efforts to change the cultural perception of STEM such that it's more attractive to women.

Attitudes toward professions change over time. If you go far enough back most secondary school teachers were men. We may never reach complete gender balance in STEM, and I am 100% okay with that. That said, to the extent the imbalance is the result of mutable cultural phenomena it may be worth attempting to modify them such that women begin to prefer STEM careers at a higher rate than they do now.

Comment: need more data... (Score 1) 329

by buddyglass (#47745585) Attached to: ACM Blames the PC For Driving Women Away From Computer Science
What I would like to see is a statistical comparison of students, male and female, who, as high school seniors, score approximately the same on the SAT, and at levels that representative of folks who later enter STEM careers. So maybe we compare the set of students who score 750+ on Math and between 600 and 650 on verbal. Limiting the verbal range at both the high and low ends is intentional; perhaps a student who scores extremely high in both math and verbal may be more drawn to careers that benefit more from verbal ability. So we take this set of students, divide them into male and females, then check back in six years and see which degrees they end up with.

For instance, this might answer questions like, "To what extent is the gender gap in STEM degrees caused by differing levels of aptitude and to what extent is it simply a result of preference?" We'd be comparing students with similar ability and aptitude. At least, to the extent a blunt instrument like the SAT is a valid proxy for ability and aptitude. What degrees do highly mathematically gifted and somewhat verbally gifted women actually pursue? What about men who are similarly gifted in both areas?

Comment: Re:The problem, as always... (Score 4, Insightful) 329

by buddyglass (#47745567) Attached to: ACM Blames the PC For Driving Women Away From Computer Science

Stop trying to turn it into a fucking social issue, its a god damn evolution issue.

Then we would expect to see very little variation from country to country in terms of male vs. female interest in STEM careers, right? Is that the case? It may be the case there there are physiological differences between men and women on an aggregate level that give rise to some of the gender disparity, but you're an idiot if you don't think social issues also play a part. For instance, if it's all physiological then why was women's participation in computer science higher in 1984 than it is today?

Comment: Re:SO WHAT? (Score 2) 329

by buddyglass (#47745535) Attached to: ACM Blames the PC For Driving Women Away From Computer Science
In terms of forcing someone to learn something, at least at the high school level, the argument is that it's sometimes good for kids to learn some things even when they don't want to. I may not think that's true for the specific case of computer science, but that's the argument being made. It's the same reason everybody who attends secondary school in the U.S. is forced to take English, some science, some math, some history, etc., even if they're wholly uninterested in one of those subjects.

With respect to why we might want to break down cultural taboos that keep women out of STEM fields, it might be because doing so could potentially both increase the quality of the U.S. STEM workforce and/or allow it to increase in size. If one half of your population opts out of a given profession then that shrinks the pool of potential talent.

Comment: Re:The problem, as always... (Score 1) 329

by buddyglass (#47745501) Attached to: ACM Blames the PC For Driving Women Away From Computer Science
I'm a male software dev. And I look at computers as tools to do other things. What's more, I think most people, including male people, are more or less the same as me. I'm on the computer so much because I'm using it as a tool to, say, communicate with other people. Or consume information. Or compete with people online. Etc.

I wish you humans would leave me alone.

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