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Comment: Re:Streinsad Effect? (Score 1) 131

by bruno.fatia (#41472865) Attached to: Google Brazil Exec "Detained" For Refusing YouTube Takedown Order

The US law does apply to Gasprom in US territory. And they either (a) comply with local laws or (b) are denied the right to act inside the United States. What you are implying is simply stupid, which is regulating the market with fixed prices. In this case we are not talking about the sale of a product but the streaming of a video which the court ruled infringes election laws thereby threatens the sovernity of a country. We really shouldn't let private companies interfere with elections because that just empowers the top 1%ers who control those companies. I still think that we should not regulate the internet as a one-sided single nation desicion but if anything we should not interfere with the government of any democratic country and influence people that way. That makes it easy for them to push a political agenda of some sort, for example, Copyright enforcement.

I'm pretty sure you will still disagree with my point of view but please at least make examples that make sense.

Comment: Re:Streinsad Effect? (Score 3, Insightful) 131

by bruno.fatia (#41470591) Attached to: Google Brazil Exec "Detained" For Refusing YouTube Takedown Order

That's not how you do business and this is not a reason for not operating in some country. They earn money in Brazil and they would just lose that revenue by skipping a large economy just because of some silly youtube video. Having a local office helps you receive payments and is a major deal breaker expecially when dealing with corporate customers.

If, during american elections, people posted videos saying Obama is a rapist and favors abortion I'm sure it would be removed.

Comment: Re:The Internet Needs to be Policed (Score 4, Interesting) 67

by bruno.fatia (#40957175) Attached to: Australian Gov't Drops Plan To Snoop On Internet Use — For Now

I had already moderated on this topic but after reading this post I felt like whoever mod parent down was -1, Disagree.

I understand OP point of view but with something as global as the Internet why should one government or another regulate it?
Either give it to the UN or better, don't regulate it at all. Why should US cops snoop on data that comes from say, Latin America to Canada?
I think that from now on we should be standardizing encryption because the overhead it causes IS worth it.

Comment: Re:ask a mechanic (Score 1) 672

by bruno.fatia (#39143029) Attached to: Have Bad Cars Gone Extinct?

Well you get what you pay for. The build quality of a Lamborguini is different of Audi which itself is different from Volkswagen (They are all part of the Porsche Holding).
But I should say the same powertrain used in Audi is used in most of the VW family (the TFSI gasoline direct injection engine with S Tronic/DSG - Audi/Volkswagen branding, they are the same gearbox and they're fantastic)... I know you might be used to larger V8/V6 engines (common in the US, not so common in the rest of the world where fuel is expensive) but these engines have nice milage and very decent power, and as you said, they are very fun :)

Comment: Re:I'll just be right here... (Score 2) 151

by bruno.fatia (#38670598) Attached to: India Mobile Handset Backdoor Memo Probably a Fake

It is also unclear how Symantec's source code ended up with the Lords of Dharmaraja, whose public face goes by the name Yamatough on a Twitter feed.
Yamatough, whose profile picture shows a Tibetan painting of Dharmaraja, the Hindu god of death and justice, follows many members of the "Anonymous" hacking collective, and Symantec attributes the hack to that group.

I never knew you could follow someone Anonymous.

"It's curtains for you, Mighty Mouse! This gun is so futuristic that even *I* don't know how it works!" -- from Ralph Bakshi's Mighty Mouse

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