Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re: Running your own server (Score 1) 435

by bromoseltzer (#45295133) Attached to: The Case Against Gmail
There are at least 2 issues with cloud mail like gmail -- having GBs of mail archive sitting there (the static problem) and you have email coming & going over SMTP (dynamic). Got to deal with both. Unfortunately, you probably do need a first class (authenticated) SMTP relay for reliable outgoing mail. Tanstaafl!

Comment: Running your own server (Score 2) 435

by bromoseltzer (#45285249) Attached to: The Case Against Gmail
I just replaced my Google Mail account with a Raspberry Pi running Postfix and Dovecot. It does the job, if you don't get more than a few messages per minute. My motivation is to reduce my Internet Data Footprint -- the amount of stuff that is available to Google, NSA, et al to paw through. It uses trivial power, so there's no issue running 24/7. (If you're thinking about this, I'd recommend the BeagleBone Black - a lot faster for $10 more.)

The worst downside (besides having to set up and manage the thing) is spam control. Gmail is excellent at this, and Postfix/Amavis/Spamassassin only catches a fraction of the incoming bad stuff. There are cloud services for spam filtering, but they seem expensive for a single user.

Comment: Re:I always thought... (Score 1) 246

by bromoseltzer (#43941121) Attached to: One Year After World IPv6 Launch — Are We There Yet?

I prefer this visualisation;

I wanted to make a cool graphic to show the relative sizes of the IPv4 and IPv6 address spaces. You know, where I’d show the IPv6 address space as a big box and the IPv4 address space as a tiny one. The problem is that the IPv6 address space is so much larger than the IPv4 space that there is no way to show it to scale! To make this diagram to scale, imagine the IPv4 address space is the 1.6-inch square above. In that case, the IPv6 address space would be represented by a square the size of the solar system.

I think this is why logarithms were invented.

Comment: Re:Economic Stimulus (Score 1) 327

by bromoseltzer (#42229573) Attached to: Nationwide Google Fiber Deployment Would Cost $140 Billion

There's no bad way to spend $140 B (or more).

Blowing up children in Yemen would stand out as a bad way to spend that kind of money. vs. being put to productive use in the US economy.

As economic stimulus goes, I think I'd rather have bridges that don't fall down and railways that work than 1 Gbps to my home.

If the USG weren't trying to take defacto control of the majority of the Middle East, you could have both.

Quite so. Of course, end-of-war savings (peace dividends) rarely seem to materialize. Still, spending is good for the economy -- even if you only pay people to dig holes in the ground and fill them up. Of course it's still better if they fix bridges and highways and avoid shooting people.

Comment: Economic Stimulus (Score 1) 327

by bromoseltzer (#42227643) Attached to: Nationwide Google Fiber Deployment Would Cost $140 Billion

Yes, but the Iraq war benefits the bankers, globalists, and components of the military-industrial-media complex. Nationwide gigabit fiber would chiefly benefit the citizenry and small businesses. So, the Legislators simply can't vote for such a thing!

There's no bad way to spend $140 B (or more). A lot goes into the pockets of workers who dig trenches and string fiber. (We really need those jobs.) Some goes to electronics manufacturers, but it all stimulates the economy -- and serves somebody's interests. The problem is if AT&T, Verizon, et. al. are locked out, especially if it's a government investment.

As economic stimulus goes, I think I'd rather have bridges that don't fall down and railways that work than 1 Gbps to my home. A mere 100 Mbs should keep me happy for the next 5 years, I'm thinking. I making do with 18 at the moment.

New systems generate new problems.

Working...