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Comment: Privacy Concerns? (Score 2) 261

by brentonboy (#47768399) Attached to: DoT Proposes Mandating Vehicle-To-Vehicle Communications

> transmission of a vehicle's location, which comes with privacy concerns.

We already had this debate when they mandated installing lights on vehicles, which also transmits the location of a vehicle and raised privacy concerns. In the end, the ability to not crash into invisible cars beat out the privacy concerns, IIRC.

Comment: Sharing with other people is not the problem (Score 1) 117

by brentonboy (#47713499) Attached to: 51% of Computer Users Share Passwords

People are good at evaluating the risks of sharing personal info with other people.

The real problem is people sharing the same password between multiple sites. People are really bad at evaluating the risks of any given website being hacked and thus making all other sites that use that password hacked as well.

The best thing we can do for security is encourage to write their site-unique passwords on sticky notes and post them clearly and legibly on their monitors. We'd go from millions of people being compromised every day by malicious hackers with a means of really messing you up, to one or two being hacked a day by someone's brother wanting to pull a prank.

Once people make 10 unique passwords, they'll switch to a password manager. But even if they don't, you're safer printing your username and password on a t-shirt than you are re-using the same password on both google.com and adobe.com.

Comment: Re:The govenment should just double spending. (Score 2) 767

by brentonboy (#45157151) Attached to: Shutdown Cost the US Economy $24 Billion

In other words, when it says it "cost the economy $24 Billion," what it really means is that the US government spent $24 billion less than it would have otherwise.

If that really was the problem, it could be fixed with a bill to buy $24 billion worth of paperclips.

Am I the only one who thinks we're approaching this backwards?

Comment: Re:The plaintext passwords isn't the issue (Score 1) 482

by brentonboy (#44502159) Attached to: Chrome's Insane Password Security Strategy

Why not just use KeePass or LastPass? Occam's Razor suggests it. In other words, why reinvent a wheel that has already been invented?

I do. It's a huge pain. It would be "simpler" to have it built-in to my browser. But there must be a reason Google hasn't done it. (Other than "LastPass already exists".)

Comment: The plaintext passwords isn't the issue (Score 2) 482

by brentonboy (#44501101) Attached to: Chrome's Insane Password Security Strategy

Sure, it's shocking for someone who thought their passwords were safe in Chrome to realize that they're visible with four clicks. But the real issue is that Chrome passwords aren't really stored safely. If you get a virus on your system, it has full access to the passwords.

Honest question: why doesn't Chrome implement something similar to KeePass or LastPass? Is there some technical reason? Is it astoundingly difficult? Does it not actually provide additional security against malware?

Comment: Re:Has nothing to do with evolution (Score 1) 121

I think there's a difference between breeding and evolution. Breeding plays with existing traits and amplifies/changes them. Evolution actually creates something new. You can't "breed" a dog to have wings or gills or anything that the ancestor wolves didn't have. But you can play with size and hair length and things like that.

Comment: What did that one computer spit out it's CD tray? (Score 1) 341

by brentonboy (#41757021) Attached to: Boeing's CHAMP Missile Uses Radio Waves To Remotely Disable PCs

In the video when the microwaves hit, one of the computers ejects it's CD tray and something falls out. What was it? What could cause that to happen? Did something trigger the eject functionality, or was it caused by overheating pieces inside somehow?

Comment: Re:Standard practice? (Score 1) 192

by brentonboy (#40262619) Attached to: LinkedIn Password Leak: Salt Their Hide

I never give security questions the kind of thing they ask for. If they want my mother's maiden name, they might get "Cheverolet Caprice" (a car I have never owned), or the name of the neighbors's dog that I hate. I really doubt that they are going to check to see if I gave a valid name.

Actually, I do this too. But I'm betting a lot of LinkedIn users don't.

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