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Comment: Re:AI is always "right around the corner". (Score 2) 556

"that can recognize your commands and search the internet for what you requested"

Unless you talk a little bit too fast, or don't have an American accent.

"or translate your statement into any of a dozen foreign languages"

Generally very badly, with no understanding of what you said and therefore isn't going to replace human translators anytime soon.

"has a camera that can recognize faces,"

Which is also quite a stretch, given how often it 'recognises' patches of lichen on a wall as a face.

"can connect to expert systems that can, for instance, diagnose diseases better than all but the very best doctors"

Really? First I've heard of this one. Citation needed I think.

"Oh, and your cellphone can also beat any grandmaster in the world at chess."

As above. And anyway, if the grandmaster followed the same instructions as the computer, it would win right back. Does that mean anything though?

Comment: Re:See even Microsoft thinks MacBook Airs rule! (Score 1) 365

PC's don't come with Adobe CC out of the box either, so it's no comparison. iPhoto blows the socks off any photo editing / management app that you can get for free for Windows. By miles. Quite apart from the fact that normal people can use it, it actually manages to organise your photo library in a sensible way without requiring you to dick around with folders.

Whether or not Lightroom is better or worse than Aperture is a matter of opinion. I've used both, and rather prefer Aperture, but Lightroom does have more features. Aperture's organisation of photos is far superior - but it depends on how you like to look after your photo library.

And of course, Photoshop is available for both Mac and Windows, so there's no argument there either.

Comment: Re:This act is highly illegal (Score 1) 322

by brantondaveperson (#47149727) Attached to: Registry Hack Enables Continued Updates For Windows XP

Ha - awesome. You insulted me. Good job.

So the thing is this - the ease with which it's possible to fake your system's credentials to receive support for which you haven't paid is irrelevant. It simply doesn't matter how easy it is - the only thing that matters is whether or not you do it knowingly. If you, with intent and planning, put that number 9 into a registry key with the aim of extending the support beyond its legitimate date, then yes you have committed a crime (*)

Why is this not obvious?

* Now, to be clear, I don't know if it's a crime or just a civil matter or whatever - and it's highly unlikely that you will be pursued for committing this heinous act - but the point I'm trying to make is that intent is the issue, not that it being easy to do makes it ok.

Comment: Re:As Jim Morrison said... (Score 1) 1198

by brantondaveperson (#47124565) Attached to: Misogyny, Entitlement, and Nerds

Most women I've met fall under one of two categories,

Seriously? Most women you've met fall under two categories? For real? And let me guess, do those categories happen to be slut and not-slut? Let's read on...

... already taken ... or boyfriend hopping ...

Well I'll be. How about that. Your attitude to women is quite frankly pretty shocking, except of course it isn't because I hear it all the time. Listen carefully. Women do not fall into 'one of two categories'. Not even most women. There is no 'they'. I mean, are you trolling or something? Do you really believe this shit? How old are you?

Comment: Re:This act is highly illegal (Score 2) 322

by brantondaveperson (#47096101) Attached to: Registry Hack Enables Continued Updates For Windows XP

Why do slashdotters find these issues so hard to understand. The law is all about intent. If you intend to access services to which you are not entitled, the ease with which you do so is entirely irrelevant to the discussion of whether or not your actions are legal.

You can type in eighteen "plain text" keystrokes (whatever that means - aren't all keystrokes plain text? Anyway) and log into the Attorney General's gmail account. Well, if you knew the password you could. But the action is trivially simple. And that doesn't matter. And why would it? Would you want the law to be based on how difficult an action is to undertake? It's pretty easy to pull a trigger you know...

Comment: Re:This act is highly illegal (Score 1) 322

by brantondaveperson (#47096083) Attached to: Registry Hack Enables Continued Updates For Windows XP

OH come on - just because something is easy to do automatically makes it legal. Is that your argument?

If you're not authorized to receive upgrades and/or support, and you knowingly misrepresent your system in some way in order get those upgrades and/or support. Well of course that's illegal.

If they're so special and secret, they shouldn't be something you can update.

Do you really believe that? If your life is so special and precious, it shouldn't be something I can so trivially extinguish with this here handgun.
Oops - And I told myself I wasn't going to use analogies, which inevitably end up driving the conversation in the direction of whether or not the analogy holds.
Sigh.

Comment: Re:Article is about computers OUTSIDE the classroo (Score 1) 310

Plus, the general comment seems to be that the children are used to getting their own way, and have become used to immediate gratification of their wishes. Doesn't sound like it's got a whole lot to do with computers to me. It's certainly easier to leave pre-school kids in front of iPads that it would have been to leave them in front of the TV - they have more fun with the iPad than the TV. But it doesn't change the fact that this is simply bad parenting, and not a problem with technology per se.

"Engineering without management is art." -- Jeff Johnson

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