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Comment: Re:And yet, no one understands Git. (Score 1) 203

by brantondaveperson (#49425515) Attached to: 10 Years of Git: An Interview With Linus Torvalds

But multiple checkouts just to avoid branching is not a good way to use Git, not a good argument against it.

Sorry, I forgot to address this. I'm not suggesting multiple checkouts to avoid branching, I'm suggesting multiple checkouts when working on multiple branches to avoid rebuilding when you switch from one to another.

Comment: Re:And yet, no one understands Git. (Score 1) 203

by brantondaveperson (#49425427) Attached to: 10 Years of Git: An Interview With Linus Torvalds

branching and merging are monolithic tasks that are very cumbersome

Rubbish. In SVN you can branch, and switch your working copy to the branch in a single command-line call. With the advantage that the branch exists in the central server (yes, this is an advantage) right away so other people you work with can work on it too.

it's highly encouraged and the process is almost trivial by comparison.

The cost of branching is not related to how easy the tool makes it to create a branch. Contrary to common belief, it's equally easy in both SVN and git to create a branch. The cost of branching is equal to the cost of merging those branches together. Git is no magic bullet here, if you have 'n' branches, then the cost of merging is O(n^2-n).

Comment: Re:Why? (Score 2) 279

But putting fileservers on read-only in case he does damage? That just tells me that you have no concept of data resiliency anyway.

If I was working out my last couple of weeks, and IT put their fileservers on read-only for me just in case I decided to act like a dick, I would be deeply offended. And I would walk out of the building and not return.

Comment: Re:Arduino? Good riddance! (Score 1) 92

by brantondaveperson (#49367863) Attached to: Arduino Dispute Reaches Out To Distributors

Yes of course they do.

The Arduino tools are appalling, literally the worst development environment I have ever used. And I've written code in emacs. I do appreciate that many of the competing products are a little bit too complicated, but that Arduino thing is a shocker. Surely there's a middle ground somewhere?

The forums are... well.. not very helpful.

To be fair though, the library support that ships inside that dreadful "IDE" is quite good.

Comment: Re:Without the software, Arduino is not interestin (Score 2) 92

by brantondaveperson (#49367855) Attached to: Arduino Dispute Reaches Out To Distributors

. But you can type in the few line example C program, and flash your first blinking LED program in a matter of minutes.

You could do that with all the other ones too. TI's Launchpad, Freescale's KINETIS board, STM have their discovery boards. They all let you blink some LEDs in a matter of minutes - and the Arduino ones are the most expensive. I rather suspect that most people don't do much more than blink some LEDs anyway, since doing anything much more complicated than that with the Arduino "IDE" is an extremely painful exercise indeed.

Comment: Re:a reversal to the open cockpit doors of the pas (Score 1) 447

A locked and reinforced cockpit door prevented hijackers from gaining entry to a Chinese flight a few years back [wikipedia.org].

It sounds to me, from reading about the incident, that the locked door was less important than the fact that you can't intimidate a planeful of people by threatening them with death aboard a plane anymore. The passengers and crew jumped the hijackers, and that was the end of that. A regular old door that could be opened from the outside with a code would have worked out just the same.

Technology is dominated by those who manage what they do not understand.

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