Follow Slashdot stories on Twitter

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Slashdot videos: Now with more Slashdot!

  • View

  • Discuss

  • Share

We've improved Slashdot's video section; now you can view our video interviews, product close-ups and site visits with all the usual Slashdot options to comment, share, etc. No more walled garden! It's a work in progress -- we hope you'll check it out (Learn more about the recent updates).

×

Comment: Re:Good read (Score 1) 71

by bouldin (#49124563) Attached to: Facebook AI Director Discusses Deep Learning, Hype, and the Singularity

I enjoyed what this guy had to say, too, but I was curious about what he is going to do for facebook. For that matter, what AI can do for facebook. The closest I could find was this:

Facebook can potentially show each person on Facebook about 2,000 items per day: posts, pictures, videos, etc. But no one has time for this. Hence Facebook has to automatically select 100 to 150 items that users want to see -- or need to see.

I thought the whole point of facebook was to keep up with your friends. *shrug*

Comment: looking for what? from where? (Score 1) 68

Here's part of the problem:

The six universities involved are Norwich University in Vermont (the oldest military college in the United States), the University of Washington, George Mason University, the University of Texas at San Antonio, Drexel University and the University of Colorado.

The only one of these universities with a respectably ranked CS program is U of Washington.

Comment: Re:Thought process (Score 1) 227

What part of that privacy notice bothers you?

Google requires you to have a Google account, but it explicitly says that data such as URLs you've visited or communication content will NOT be associated with your google account. There is no mention of targeting ads to your browsed websites or deep packet inspection or anything like that.

I'm not saying Google is a saint or anything, but that privacy policy looks about as good as you can expect from a private company operating in the US.

Comment: Re:What a data scientist is (Score 1) 94

by bouldin (#49046683) Attached to: What Does It Mean To Be a Data Scientist?

Just think - telecoms are accumulating petabytes of data from call setup and cellular handoffs EVERY FEW MONTHS. And this data can be cross referenced with subscriber data and sliced and diced in almost infinitely many different ways. If you're the one reciting stats like that with wide open eyes, you're a Data Scientist. If you just shrug and say, "Yeah. So?" like everyone else, you're not.

I agree, and playing with that kind of data actually sounds fun.

The big question is, though, what can you do with that information? You could study commute patterns (interesting to a scientist but low-value to a telecom, and more easily found with GPS tracking on a sample, anyway) or you can use this for capacity planning (but the statistics are so trivial you don't really need a data scientist).

I think people (especially marketers) tend to have inflated expectations of what you can actually accomplish with data science.

For example, despite all facebook's claims to having a treasure trove of profile data, their ad placement does not seem to be any better than google's keyword-driven ad placement.

Comment: Re:What do you mean, modern? (Score 1) 716

by bouldin (#49034813) Attached to: Is Modern Linux Becoming Too Complex?

Understood. My point was that these distros do not have a clear focus, purpose, or identity.

From http://www.itworld.com/article/2856604/with-unity-8-ubuntu-will-bring-pure-linux-experience-to-mobile-devices.html

It is evolving from a server/desktop OS to one that will run the same codebase across devices such as TVs, desktops, tablets and smartphones.

I think part of the problem we are seeing is that distros are trying to handle the server, desktop, and mobile markets with one codebase, and, as a result, they are not great at any one them.

Comment: Re:What do you mean, modern? (Score 1) 716

by bouldin (#49029459) Attached to: Is Modern Linux Becoming Too Complex?

I like CentOS too, but CentOS 7 will have systemd for reasons I don't understand.

Here is a page with systemd advantages for CentOS (https://linuxacademy.com/blog/linux/centos-7-take-the-plunge-into-systemd/), and I don't need any of this:

Read Ahead

Socket Based Activation of Service

Device Based Activation of Service (i.e. USB)

System Snapshotting (Virtualization, ZFS, or otherwise

SELinux Full Integration (Kernel level, not service level)

Device Dependency Configuration (udev rules)

Service Respawn without Connectivity Drop

Service SSL Cert/LUKS Password Handling (including Console, wall and Gnome Agents)

Interactive Bootup (Dependency Based with Confirmation of Service Start)

Reliable Termination of User Sessions During Shutown

Earlier BOOT Logging

Comment: Re:What do you mean, modern? (Score 5, Insightful) 716

by bouldin (#49028575) Attached to: Is Modern Linux Becoming Too Complex?

This.

I would personally like to see three flavors of Linux:

Server - lean, NO systemd or plug-and-play crap, focus on security

Desktop - includes whatever bells and whistles people need for a modern, useable desktop; focus on productivity

Mobile - similar to desktop, but with a focus on low power consumption and small screens

I don't need a tablet GUI on my desktop, and I don't need hotplug support for webcams and printers on my server.

Comment: Re:KNOW what "fastflux" is? (Score 1) 467

by bouldin (#48901031) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Best Anti-Virus Software In 2015? Free Or Paid?

NO, by the time those blogs post a domain name, it is not being used anymore. The malware will generate another domain name based on the date/time, and you will not have that domain name in your blacklist.

See subject: I'm protected if an entry's blocked in hosts, period. Yes, I have any DGA generated hostnames. I get them from my sources in the security community I noted.

Do you understand what words mean? I've walked you through it, but you still don't understand the difference between DGAs and Fast Flux. I even gave you a link to an opendns blog that explains what DGAs are. I guess you will never get it.

LMAO - listen you little ARROGANT NOBODY: Has your work EVER been a FINALIST @ Microsoft TechEd, 2 yrs. in a ROW, in its HARDEST CATEGORY? Mine has. It also went into commercially sold ware to this day because of it. * How about you? You pick on my shareware here, where's YOURS that does a BETTER JOB?? It's not. APK P.S.=> Unbelievable - I've been writing code professionally AND SECURING PC's before you were out of diapers I'd strongly wager!

Uh, no, you have never written any commercially sold code.

I've developed security products for actual security companies, and work as a security engineer. Where do you "work," your mom's basement?

Arrogant and stupid are a bad combination.

Comment: Re:I still get them added as blocked (Score 1) 467

by bouldin (#48898125) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Best Anti-Virus Software In 2015? Free Or Paid?

* See Gar Warner's blog (has many DGA botnets' C&C + payload servers listed). Thus - I don't *HAVE* to predict them in hosts: I simply block them as they are added. If they last longer than 1 second, I get them added as blocked by 12 reputable sources in the security community OR from security blog articles (like Mr. Warner I mentioned). It works simply because DGA uses hostnames.

NO, by the time those blogs post a domain name, it is not being used anymore. The malware will generate another domain name based on the date/time, and you will not have that domain name in your blacklist.

You still don't get it, so I guess I'm giving up. This is like explaining Calculus to a housecat.

P.S.=> No matter what you say, as long as I get entries for ANY KIND of threat online as blocked entered in hosts (and I do by the truckloads every hour here due to my program being automated to pickup that data), they cannot harm me

This is not true! Malware has so many ways it can circumvent a hosts file. A hosts file is great for blocking ad domains, but it does NOT provide strong security.

Here are just some of the ways malware can completely bypass your hosts file:

  • It can hardcode a C&C IP address, like the Sony Pictures malware did
  • It can hardcode IP addresses for a peer-to-peer network, like the new Zeus variants do
  • It can just send the UDP port 53 packets to resolve DNS itself, bypassing the system calls that would check the hosts file
  • It can disable checking of the hosts file
  • I could keep going. There are a LOT of ways to bypass the OS hosts file.

Comment: Re:You fail again... apk (Score 1) 467

by bouldin (#48896691) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Best Anti-Virus Software In 2015? Free Or Paid?

The odds of me hitting a domain that lasts 1 second? Near zero.

Nobody said DGAs use domains that last 1 second. I said 1 hour. Some malware might use domains that last 24 hours. But, the point is that the domain name calculated by the malware changes faster than you can update your blacklist.

Again, clue: Hosts block a domain name, no matter what, I can't be harmed by it

I say again, by the time you know the domain name, it is no longer being used. Your hosts file program does not magically predict domain names.

He: Let's end it all, bequeathin' our brains to science. She: What?!? Science got enough trouble with their OWN brains. -- Walt Kelly

Working...