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Comment: Re:Here's Two suggestions (Score 1) 123

And yet another suggestion - somewhat natural chelating agents, specifically Itaconix DSP 2K polymers (http://www.itaconix.com/products.html) Admitadly, you'd need several boatloads, but the general concept should be to latch on to the contaminants chemically, and then weigh the complex down to the point that they quickly precipitate out. Covering the sediment with inert material would probably be a good idea also.

Comment: Re:Laser cutter suggested (Score 1) 49

by bobzchemist (#42310289) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Setting Up a Summer Camp Tech Center?
I totally agree with the laser cutter, but also get at least two 3d-printers (in case one breaks). You are really trying to serve two populations - the camper with a casual interest who needs to have a project able to be completed in an afternoon (or he loses interest, thus the quick laser cutter), and the camper who's interested enough to complete a longer-term project, who would be interested in the slower 3d printer. MAKE magazine is currently running a special issue specifically on 3d printers, I suggest you pick it up - and there are many open-source templates that can be easily downloaded and used as-is. I was a counselor at a similar camp (Buck's Rock) so I'm making suggestions based on my experiences there - if they don't apply to you, sorry... I think there's definitely a place for technology as a part of art. From what I can see of your website briefly, you're not integrating it all that well. (Not that I'm surprised, and you shouldn't be discouraged, it's hard to do, and many traditional artist are resisting it strongly) Digital art can be incorporated into many media - painting, ceramics, and print-making through image transfer, screen-printing, or by itself with giclee printing. The laser cutter and 3d printer let you take that into the realm of sculpture, but you may not need separate classes - some of the artists working with you now should be quite able to do this. Digital painting is a separate skillset, though - you may need to bring in a specialist, as well as equipment (wacom tablets, etc,) For counselors/instructors, I'd suggest talking to MIT or Cornell for some bright undergrads - I don't think 3d printing has made it's way into art schools yet. makerspaces are another good place to look.

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