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Comment: Statistics, statistics... (Score 5, Interesting) 234 234

This is probably because people with bad hearts, etc., do not drink coffee, hence only people who are healthier drink coffee when they are old. Isn't it amazing that they would have a reduced death rate. Imagine what the relative death rate would be for old people who skydive, compared to those who don't?

Comment: Re:Oh dear (Score 1) 498 498

1. He wasn't writing this, he was describing it on Donahue, during an interview. It is too long ago for me to recall if he was hawking a book, but I don't believe that he was. 2. There are a gazillion items surrounding us today that would have elicited a similar "fecal" remark 100 years ago, let alone 100,000 years ago. Just as a "for instance", contemplate strands of nanotubes, metallically sealed, perhaps in a honeycomb structure, perhaps bonded through a metallic core. Even if the strength of each strand was slight, imagine 10^15 strands. Might be quite strong, lightweight, and thin? But I suppose a bigger issue is that we cannot fly about as UFOs are described. But what about in 500 years? 10,000? 100,000?

Comment: Re:This has happened many times since the late 60s (Score 1) 498 498

As for reliability, the missile silo guys are vetted more than just about anyone in the country. Too many reliable individuals have seen UFOs for there not to be something going on. Donahue had a retired Major on the program in about 1979-1980 who described picking up dead bodies of small, alien looking individuals at Rosswell. He also described picking up a piece of metal, thin as aluminum foil, but he couldn't dent it with a sledgehammer.
Government

EU Patent Examiners Warn Parliament Will Have "No Power" 99 99

zoobab writes "The Staff Union of the European Patent Organisation sent a letter to the President of the European Parliament, warning that after the EU accedes to the European Patent Convention, there is a risk that the European Parliament would be 'circumvented' as a legislator. The European Patent Organisation is in no way a model of democracy: national patent offices are in power, there is no parliament involved in the decision-making process, and diplomatic conferences are held behind closed doors. There are plans to create a central patent court in Europe, which would operate in a democratic vacuum, not counterbalanced by any legislative assembly, in particular not the European Parliament. Such a central patent court could also validate software patents via caselaw (as the German Supreme Court recently did with the Microsoft FAT patent). And Microsoft, IBM, and SAP are lobbying in Brussels not to reopen consideration of the software patent directive."
PlayStation (Games)

Sony Makes It Hard To Develop For the PS3 On Purpose 616 616

adeelarshad82 writes "CNet reports on a bizarre comment from Sony's Computer Entertainment CEO in response to complaints from developers on how hard it is to develop games for the Playstation 3. 'We don't provide the "easy to program for" console that (developers) want, because "easy to program for" means that anybody will be able to take advantage of pretty much what the hardware can do, so then the question is, what do you do for the rest of the nine-and-a-half years?' Given that games heavily drive console sales, and the fact that the PS3 is already 8 million units behind the Xbox 360, I think making a developer's job harder is the last thing Sony needs."

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