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Comment: Re:Design (Score 1) 314

by bobbonomo (#27542591) Attached to: COBOL Turning 50, Still Important

Partly true. The Y2K think was to save 2 bytes. I remember a similar problem at the time and saying "2 bytes! are you kidding?" The response was "the app has x number of clients and x number of fields. This will save 2 disk spindles". The wise-ass kid (me) turned around, removed foot from mouth, and solved the problem. Oh and it was COBOL.

Spindles were 100MB to 200MB, big like dishwashers, and cost a gazillion plus your next new born.

Comment: Re:Run to my openWRT router and look for.. what? (Score 1) 272

by bobbonomo (#27307201) Attached to: Botnet Worm Targets DSL Modems and Routers

A Linux based router with public/private keys would do the trick. Well I guess 'till someone breaks that too. DD-WRT has this ability but, when you do turn it on, it does not disable the user/password thing (last time I looked). A -p or something on the sshd command needs to be added.

Comment: My Generation (Score 1) 278

by bobbonomo (#27140679) Attached to: South Korea Joins the "Three Strikes" Ranks

I did not read this whole thread because there is too much... and this is like arguing religion or politics. Here are my comments anywho.

I take you back about 50 years when mimeograph machine started to make copies and then to photocopiers. I wonder where the photocopy industry (Xerox) would be if we had been this stiff about copyrights in those days. OK so "we" passed "fair usage laws". End of problem.

Do we realise how many times copyright laws are broken in offices today throughout the world? Look around the office. How many photocopies of everthing are there around? Magazines, newspapers, printed copies of web sites. Photocopies of this and that at school. We do this without even thinking. I remember when we made a "Xerox" of something instead of a copy. Technically they are all copyright violations. Oh yeah... "fair usage". Right!

OK so "you" need to invent "fair usage" again.

I do understand the need for copyright as in "I take IP of someone else and sell it for profit" as though it were mine.

To use the analogy above, if I share an electronic copy of a tune with a friend, I am simply making a photocopy of the New York Times front page and giving it to someone so they can read it. Yes, I did deprive the artist of 1 sell but I also did it to the New York Times. No one makes a fuss about the latter not even NYT.

Isn't P2P like photocopying. Bet ya the RIAAAAAAA have copies of things. How many A's in that?

Three strikes? Who's on first?

Music

At Atlantic Records, Digital Sales Surpass CDs 273

Posted by kdawson
from the trading-analog-dollars-for-digital-pennies dept.
The NYTimes reports that Atlantic is the first major label to report getting a majority of its revenue from digital sales, not CDs. Analysts say that Atlantic is out in front — the industry as a whole isn't expected to hit the 50% mark until 2011. By 2013, music industry revenues will be 37% down from their 1999 levels (when Napster arrived on the scene), according to Forrester. "'It's not at all clear that digital economics can make up for the drop in physical,' said John Rose, a former executive at EMI ... Instead, the music industry is now hoping to find growth from a variety of other revenue streams it has not always had access to, like concert ticket sales and merchandise from artist tours. ... In virtually all... corners of the media world, executives are fighting to hold onto as much of their old business as possible while transitioning to digital — a difficult process that NBC Universal's chief executive ... has described as 'trading analog dollars for digital pennies.'"
Databases

Searching DNA For Relatives Raises Concerns 199

Posted by kdawson
from the database-creep dept.
An anonymous reader calls our attention to California's familial searching policy, which looks for genetic ties between culprits and kin. The technique has come to the fore in the last few years, after a Colorado prosecutor pushed the FBI to relax its rules on cross-state searches. "Los Angeles Police Department investigators want to search the state's DNA database again — not for exact matches but for any profiles similar enough to belong to a parent or sibling. The hope is that one of those family members might lead detectives to the killer. This strategy, pioneered in Britain, is poised to become an important crime-fighting tool in the United States. The Los Angeles case will mark the first major use of California's newly approved familial searching policy, the most far-reaching in the nation."
Image

Researchers Claim To Be Able To Determine Political Leaning By How Messy You Are 592

Posted by samzenpus
from the dirty-liberal dept.
According to a study to be published in The Journal of Political Psychology, you can tell someone's political affiliation by looking at the condition of their offices and bedrooms. Conservatives tend to be neat and liberals love a mess. Researchers found that the bedrooms and offices of liberals tend to be colorful and full of books about travel, ethnicity, feminism and music, along with music CDs covering folk, classic and modern rock, as well as art supplies, movie tickets and travel memorabilia. Their conservative contemporaries, on the other hand, tend to surround themselves with calendars, postage stamps, laundry baskets, irons and sewing materials. Their bedrooms and offices are well lit and decorated with sports paraphernalia and flags — especially American ones. Sam Gosling, an associate professor of psychology at the University of Texas at Austin, says these room cues are "behavioral residue." The findings are just the latest in a series of recent attempts to unearth politics in personality, the brain and DNA. I, for one, support a woman's right to clean.
Science

Wearable Motion Capture 91

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the all-your-motion-are-belong-to-us dept.
AnonymousHack writes "Swiss and MIT researchers have developed a wearable kit that will capture your every move for mapping onto a virtual character. It's almost as accurate as the camera-based motion capture used in studios to develop games. The team have recorded people's movements in completely new locations — like driving a car — previously out of reach. There is even a video of it in action."
The Internet

+ - Child pornography's 'other victims'

Submitted by
netbuzz
netbuzz writes "Standing falsely accused of any crime — especially one as stigmatizing as possession of child pornography — is one of those frightening prospects we'd all rather not contemplate. That gets more difficult, however, as examples keep piling up. The latest case involves a British investigation that tied some 7,000 credit-card holders to distributors of child pornography. It's now believed that at least several hundred of those accounts were stolen and that the account holders were falsely accused.

http://www.networkworld.com/community/?q=node/1503 5"

C for yourself.

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