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Comment: Re:A lawyer's perspective (Score 1) 183

by bobaferret (#49111459) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: How Can Technology Improve the Judicial System?

As a coder in illinois who's currently trying to implement/ implemented a PACER like system for 70 of the 102 counties. Cost is really not a problem. Who pays the cost is, and most attorneys at this time are not big fans of tech. We're starting to get some success in the state, but it's slow coming. We have better luck with out of county Attorneys than local ones, since they can't just walk across the street to file something. In the last 5 years, a large number of our courts have started scanning everything, and in the last year or so, we've had a good amount of success at getting them to put all of the documents online. Currently it's only the attorneys of record who can see those documents though due to IL supreme court rules.

Your calendar thing cracks me up though, we implemented and ical feed for all of our courts 10+ years ago. This is per attorney or judge, or police officer btw.
Of the 70 counties where this is available, we have 1 user of it..... out of 74692 attorneys. I keep hoping that the younger generation of attorneys, and their secretaries) coming into office in the last few years will have higher technical expectations than the old farts who are leaving, but only time will tell.

I guess my point is that the tech is there, the courts have put it into place and paid for it, but the attorneys just don't have the desire to use it, much less share the cost.

Comment: Re:Blade servers blow (Score 1) 56

by bobaferret (#48168571) Attached to: Making Best Use of Data Center Space: Density Vs. Isolation

We're actually moving away from blade servers to standalone servers. You can get so many cores on a chip now that each set of 8 blades can be replaced by 1 2U server. Each server has a number of raided 2.5" drives that we use with glusterfs for redundancy between servers which we then re-export over Fiber channel so that we can get rid of our dedicated FC arrays, yet continue to use the FC infrastructure we have in place.

Comment: Re:Answer: You can't. Even wired (Score 1) 279

I have fiber in my house as well; not Google, but got an opportunity and took it. It's a new house and we ran cat 5e everywhere. Maybe some day I'll regret not running cat 6, but I doubt it. I just recently put the ends on the cables, and stopped using wireless for everything. It's made a huge difference, and well worth it. It's not uncommon for 5 people to be streaming something different at the same time, and the wireless just couldn't handle it. Depending, you might be able to replace all of you phone lines with ethernet. You can always use an RJ11 in an RJ45 jack and just decide at the patch panel what it's going to be, phone or ethernet. If this isn't a new house, chances are you have a bunch of unused phone jacks just taking up wall space. And depending, you might just be able to pull the ethernet using the old phone line.

good luck

Comment: Re:Bottom line: is Systemd popular with Linux user (Score 1) 774

by bobaferret (#48093845) Attached to: Systemd Adding Its Own Console To Linux Systems

I haven't seen a lot of pressure yet. With RHEL6 the urge to switch came on fast. Esp with regards to virtualization and what not. I haven't gotten the sense that RHEL7 has a whole lot of "must have now" tech in it, as opposed to the amount of systemd fear it has. Based on some quick googling, systemd can be configured to send your log files over syslog so that takes care of most of my corporate compliance concerns. I don't think the systemd folks have done a good jobs educating people on how it can fit into existing workflows. Esp. against all of the noise out there. I don't really know if it's even possible to fit it in with everything. But I guess we'll find out. I currently have no opinion, I see some benefits as well as some drawbacks.

Comment: Re:Slashdot Response (Score 1) 774

by bobaferret (#48093625) Attached to: Systemd Adding Its Own Console To Linux Systems

I guess that's sort of my issue as well. Why isn't systemd modular. If They want to fix all of the problems that's great. But isn't there a way we can just use the pieces we want. I get that they've effectively made a standard API for all of the init processes to talk to each other and start up and all of that magic stuff. Terminals, Security, logins et all. There's a big mess there. No one will deny that. But it would have been nice if they'd actually defined a formal API for all of this, that we could do things differently if needed. Personally, I'm gonna stick to my RHEL6x servers till I get a good sense of the fallout from all of this. I wouldn't be surprised if someone forks RHEL6 or Debian at this point just keep systemd out of the way.

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