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Comment Re:The best summation I've seen (Score 1) 99

They know, but the people paying their bills don't care, so the "don't care" trickles down through the ad networks.

Brand X wants an in your face ad. Ad company Y can persuade brand X with common sense, but then Brand X isn't filled with marketers full of common sense, just avarice. So Ad company Y sells Brand X's "vision" of an ad because Ad Company Y's employees need to eat.

The only way to fix this is to do a eugenics program on marketers.


Comment Re:Pseudonyms have a cost to social networks (Score 1) 231

>And they aren't obligated to provide you with anything.

And I'm not obligated to give them anything either.

>you have no rights to anything they provide.

They put it up for free use. I'm going to use it. If they want to make money legitimately, they can paywall it. They don't arrest the people who walk the shopping mall every day for exercise and don't buy anything.

You really are some sort of fascist.


Comment Re:Pseudonyms have a cost to social networks (Score 1) 231

What a load of corporatist bullshit.

>alias users are misfits or troublemakers

No. Fucking NO.

You have the right to call yourself whatever you want in real life so long as you are not trying to defraud anyone while doing this. That this right supposedly suddenly doesn't exist because a corporation demands it is insane.

This does not make you a misfit. It does not make you a troublemaker.

Aliases have a history going back decades online and thousands of years offline. This sudden "hurr, you must use your real name" in a contract-of-adhesion is such bullshit.

You may believe that corporations have special rights to deny you your rights, but I don't, and neither do a lot of other sane individuals.

If Facebook's share price loses a few pennies because people like me use aliases, it's not my problem. They can find another business model.


Comment Re: Not wasted (Score 1) 177

I think you are confusing image capture resolution with image display resolution.

It doesn't matter what image image capture resolution you have if your display resolution is orders of magnitude less.

So no, I'm not confusing the two.

>I said 7 years ago

'Splain to me how RI Hospital had access to Retina display resolution. Give three examples.

I'm pretty sure it is you who are confused.


Comment Re:Does the submitter know .... (Score 1) 28

The Isle of Man TT is a thing of fucking beauty.

There is nothing else like it anywhere. Oh yes, there are moto races that are longer and "less boring" to the NASCAR crowd, but if you pay attention for even 5 minutes to this race, you will be hooked like I was.

It is motorcycle erotica. Not porn, erotica.

And they've started racing electric bikes a couple of years ago.


Comment Re: Not wasted (Score 2) 177

>It's probably industrial

Or medical.

X-rays are sent 'round the hospital not on film these days, but as files. 7-8 years ago XGA flat panels and similar were pretty standard at RI Hospital. The thing is, when you have a fracture that is the head of your radius pushed into your radius, it's very difficult to see the actual break with that fuzzy resolution (because it looks normal). After going home with some Oxycontin (urgh, never again) I had to take the actual films to my orthopedist who put them on a wall mounted light-table and then it was plain to see. Even my untrained eye caught it.

If it was an 8k display at RI Hospital, they would have seen it.

(there is nothing you can really do for that kind of fracture anyway except to use a sling when the pain gets irritating - if a doctor puts a cast on you in the ER, go to your ortho and have it cut off the next couple of days, or else you're looking at surgery on your elbow later (my ortho told me this and he was right)).


Comment Re:Where do I sign up ... (Score 1) 79

I would rather have something that auto-updates for me.

If this was merely a worm (it's not malware) that did a one-time-patch and went on its way, that isn't as useful as something that keeps itself updated and fetches useful router kernel patch upgrades by itself on a regular basis.

I already do this in my desktop Linux systems. Why can't I have it in my DSL modem/router? (yes, DSL. Fairpoint sucks.)


Comment Re:This author clearly is a Google marketroid (Score 1) 145

[Calibre is a] Windows ebook viewer.

No, Calibre is a cross platform viewer.

Welcome to fizsh, the friendly interactive zshell
Type man fizsh for instructions on how to use fizsh
bmo@ubuntu ~> apt-cache search calibre
calibre - e-book converter and library management
calibre-bin - e-book converter and library management
bmo@ubuntu ~> uname -a
Linux ubuntu 3.13.0-65-lowlatency #105-Ubuntu SMP PREEMPT Mon Sep 21 20:49:52 UTC 2015 x86_64 x86_64 x86_64 GNU/Linux
bmo@ubuntu ~>

Fuck you.


Comment Re:This author clearly is a Google marketroid (Score 1) 145

It's not that the device won't recognize imported .epub files at all, just that the default kindle app doesn't handle them well.

If I used my file system navigator of choice, ES File Manager, to navigate to the folder on the SD card and tapped on one of the e-book files, it would load just fine via the Kindle app. But it wouldnâ(TM)t be added to my library, and the Kindle app wouldnâ(TM)t remember my place in it for the next time I opened it again.

So it does actually see them, in spite of what the headline here says.


I was able to use Calibre to copy all my e-book files across, [to the sd card from a different device]

I looked for EPUB readers in the Appstore but didnâ(TM)t see any app names I recognized and didnâ(TM)t feel like trying out any of the ones I didnâ(TM)t. Maybe Iâ(TM)ll check into that some other time.

So let me get this straight...

He used Calibre to copy the files over, something he clearly installed himself earlier on another device. The new device clearly sees the files on the SD card. But he can't be arsed to put Calibre on the fucking new device because he's lazy?

I don't care. This guy is either trolling for clicks or he's a Google marketer. Considering the bashing he does earlier in the article for the fact that it's not fucking tied to Google by default (a feature if you ask me), it's the latter.


P.S. It's 2015. Can we have unicode here, PLEASE!?

No, I'm not fixing pastes anymore. Deal with it.

Comment This author clearly is a Google marketroid (Score 1) 145

In paragraph after paragraph he complains that the phone isn't integrated with Google's cloud. So what?

>but I have to log in manually every time to each Google service.

No you don't. Use a password manager. Duh. Keepass runs on Android.

>he doesn't see any epub readers in the appstore that he finds familiar

>used Calibre to put epub books on the sd card

Whiskey Tango Foxtrot?

Calibre runs on Android!

Lots has changed in calibre-land in the last year and a half.A beefed up e-book viewer. Support for Android phones and tablets. A new modern look for the calibre user interface. A portable version of calibre that you can carry around on a USB stick.

Fuck this guy.

It's a fucking 50 dollar computer. Remember OLPC and the effort to spread computers far and wide for the goal of 100 bux each? So it has some compromises because it's a 50 dollar computer. So did OLPC.


Comment Re:Spread To Sub Thermal (Score 1, Informative) 142

GPS has been de-fuzzed for the civilian side since the Clinton administration, because differential GPS made it TOAB useless.

During fuzzed NAVSTAR GPS:

Sit on known point. Calculate the vector of the fuzz. Use this vector for the rest of your survey. Get same results as Military. EVERYBODY did this.

Because it was that easy to beat.

After GPS fuzzing: Use GPS as designed, which makes it actually more useful for commerce. Instead of a toy for the military and land surveyors, it became useful enough for airlines and other transport.

The accuracy you get with GPS is dependent on your antenna and electronics and how many satellites it can see. That's it.

Last I checked the Russians have launched GLONASS and current phones /also/ use GLONASS along with NAVSTAR GPS for navigation, and other competing systems are in the works for China, India, Japan, and Europe at last check.

So even if they bring back fuzzing to NAVSTAR GPS, there are going to be enough systems in orbit to make it more than obsolete.

Which is a good thing. There shouldn't be one country in control of navigation.


Retirement means that when someone says "Have a nice day", you actually have a shot at it.