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Comment: Re:Put some content in your damn game (Score 1) 109

by bluefoxlucid (#49833929) Attached to: Valve Introduces Steam Refunds In Advance of Summer Sale

I happen to recognize and model physics quite well, up to and including real-world newtonian physics. From time to time, I'll spend nearly an hour examining things in my head that didn't work the way I expected, because my brain is better at emulating physics than I am at understanding it.

I do recognize that others aren't quite as good at video games like Sonic and Metroid, though. I pick up on everything from AI behavior to dynamic movement pretty damn fast.

Comment: Re:Put some content in your damn game (Score 1) 109

by bluefoxlucid (#49833899) Attached to: Valve Introduces Steam Refunds In Advance of Summer Sale

That's a dumb argument. I asked you why you would spend $50 for shit like Angry Birds, as the context of the initial comment was:

Put more than 2 hours of content in your game. Your game sucks. Sell your game for $2 and lobby Skype to not refund games costing less than $2 or something.

I suggested a low price for low-content games, and you come back talking about

So, because you prefer an epic gaming experience, all other gaming forms should be ignored?

Would you pay $50 for shit like Angry Birds?

Angry Birds *is* 1/10 the price of what I said. Would you pay $50 for it?

No?

Then maybe these fly-by-night, valueless, contentless game providers should sell their games for $5 and not $50, instead of expecting us to pay $50 for shit like Angry Birds.

Your entire line of argument has been stupidity, up to and including ignoring a propositional question ("Would you pay $50 for shit like Angry Birds?") and instead treating it as a declaration ("Angry Birds is like $50, why would you pay that much for something with so little content?").

Comment: Re:Structured transactions are illegal (Score 2) 373

by bluefoxlucid (#49831623) Attached to: Why Is It a Crime For Dennis Hastert To Evade Government Scrutiny?

They are not law enforcement officers; they are peace officers. The courts are law enforcement. Police are to keep the peace and order of society, not to be lawyers and judges. Stop encouraging them to be judge, jury, and executioner in matters of legality; they are judge, jury, and executioner in matters of immediate danger to the public, which is why traffic cops arrest you for going 90mph past a middle school when children are trying to walk home.

Comment: Re:Why is this on Slashdot? (Score 1) 373

by bluefoxlucid (#49831567) Attached to: Why Is It a Crime For Dennis Hastert To Evade Government Scrutiny?
What's wrong with political powers supporting NAMBLA or NAMBLA-like activities? If we, as a society, decide that is not such behavior as we want in society, we can simply disempower those political powers by voting for someone else. Bush and McCain were seen as war mongers trying to destroy Social Security, so Obama was voted in with his grand welfare plan and large statements about reducing military activity. If the Democrats openly supported a sweeping Age of Consent of eleven years, would we not vote away from a Democrat-controlled congress? If not, then the issue is utterly unimportant.

Comment: Put some content in your damn game (Score 4, Interesting) 109

by bluefoxlucid (#49830801) Attached to: Valve Introduces Steam Refunds In Advance of Summer Sale

Developers of smaller games are afraid people will buy, finish, refund? Put more than 2 hours of content in your game. Your game sucks. Sell your game for $2 and lobby Skype to not refund games costing less than $2 or something.

I spent $50 for a game that took 80 hours to complete the first time and can be completed in 6 by a highly-skilled player skipping all the dialogue after months of practice. A highly-knowledgeable player can do it in like 20. A casual player can do it in probably 30 in a rush, and often may take 40 hours to figure it all out blind. This is the story of almost every fucking game I've bought--not just JRPGs, but Ocarina of Time, Metroid Prime, Crash fucking Bandacoot, Unepic, etc. Metroid Fusion stood out to me when I beat it 4 hours after opening it--I was disappointed. Nibelumbra took 2 hours to beat, and cost $7; but then it gets out of the narrative-slash-tutorial and dumps an obscenely difficult second quest on you.

If your game is shorter than 2 hours, it shouldn't cost enough to be worth refunding.

Comment: Re:Everyone is ignoring the most important number! (Score 1) 226

What you have there is two unqualified applicants and nobody to hire yet. If this becomes routine (for example, if the government stopped funding college and concentrated on K-12), businesses would have to hire the unqualified applicants and take up their education and training, or else collapse with no engineer capable of doing their jobs.

Comment: Re:Everyone is ignoring the most important number! (Score 1) 226

Percentage of qualified applicants, you mean. Unqualified gits apply for entitled employment all the time. "I took computers in high school but I think I'd be a good fit for your 8-year-experience BA certified Oracle database engineer position because Oracle runs on Linux and I tinker with MySQL!"

Comment: Re:Does this mean... (Score 1) 144

16 is legal here, and is the driver's license age. If she can drive, you can bang her. If she drives to your house, show you a license that says she's 18, and you bang her, and she's like 15 but looks like some fucking amazon, you have a pretty good case in court.

Comment: Re:Abbott is a moron (Score 1) 306

I didn't say to teach people project management in class, although I could do that too--not that it'd be a good idea.

The absolute core of project management is the hierarchical decomposition of things into smaller, complete things. A WBS breaks down the single deliverable of a finished product into all of its parts, assembled to produce exactly 100% of the project, and each of which is further broken down in the exact same way until something recognizable and fully-understood is produced. Risk breakdown structures categorize and expand upon risks--technical, political, external, cost risks, and so forth.

Most people do not have this particular skill; most engineers come up with a short list of things which need doing, breaking problems down into an abstract pile of things. The skill of hierarchical decomposition is one that everyone should learn as a method for analysis of absolutely anything. You should use other methods in tandem, and can use their output to build a more complete hierarchy; but hierarchical decomposition is the only top-down method to break a single problem into its component parts. The rest are all bottom-up.

Comment: Re:Abbott is a moron (Score 1) 306

Learning how to decompose large problems into smaller ones that can be solved individually is also really valuable.

I have told a lot of people that a short study of project management--just a crash course from a book--would be valuable because of the context for hierarchical decomposition. Project Managers break down projects. A project's scope is broken down into a work breakdown structure (WBS) by listing the project as the top node (whole), and then breaking it into its deliverable parts--including project management, testing, and so forth, as well as solid deliverables--and then further breaking those down, until you have fully-identifiable work packages. Risks are broken down the same way in a Risk Breakdown Structure.

I encourage you to watch this ten-minute video, which explains a WBS in a way I find accurate, concise, and easily-understood. It's very approachable, in plain English language. You'll undoubtedly see that this is an excellent approach to absolutely anything you want to do; it seems obvious but, as you say, it's not a natural skill.

Comment: Re: Save in conversion, pay for copper (Score 1) 589

by bluefoxlucid (#49798419) Attached to: How Tesla Batteries Will Force Home Wiring To Go Low Voltage
Steam irons use a heated water reservoir to store steam. US irons use a hot plate through which cold water is injected. A steam iron can produce a constant stream of steam for a good half-hour, and doesn't cool when steaming... except in the US, where it can produce steam for about 10 seconds, then needs 10 more minutes to heat back up.

Neutrinos are into physicists.

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