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Submission + - Laptops in the classroom don't increase grades (

blitzkrieg3 writes: Classrooms all around the country are being fitted with one to one laptop programs, networking hardware, digital projectors, and other technology in order to stay competitive in the 21st century. Kyrene school district spent $3 million modernizing their classrooms. The problem? The increase in spending doesn't lead to an increase in test scores. Policy makers calling for high tech classrooms, including former execs from HP, Apple, and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, want to increase technology investment despite the results. Others are not so sure, or think it is an outright waste of money.

Submission + - New XO Laptop for Teenagers in Paraguay (

blitzkrieg3 writes: Plan Ceibal is providing 90,000 laptops for Paraguayan High School students to use. The XO-HS will provide 2x the processing power, 4x the memory, and 4x the persistent storage (flash). Though based on the currently shipping XO 1.5, it will have a larger keyboard, and will dual boot Gnome along with the more educational focused Sugar. Unfortunately there are no pictures. The BBC has a more thorough writeup.

Submission + - Wikileaks video depects 2 journalists killed ( 1

Anonymous writes: The video that was getting wikileaks into trouble with the US State department and CIA has finally been released. The video shows a helicopter pilot misidentify a camera as a rocket propelled grenade, and then open fire on a group of Iraqi civilians and 2 Reuters journalists. The pilot then requests and receives permission to open fire on a van picking up one of the wounded journalists. In the van were two young children, who were also seriously wounded.

Submission + - iPad and the Cloud Increase Your Carbon Footprint (

blitzkrieg3 writes: A common advatage advantage cited for cloud computing is energy savings, through the use of technologies like geothermal energy, sea water cooling, virtualization, and smart stretch clusters. Then why is Greenpeace, on the eve of the iPad release, worried about energy consumption in the cloud? They report that datacenters will account for 1,963 billion kilowatt hours of electricity in 2020, a 3 fold increase. And a lot of this energy will come from coal, such as the new datacenter Facebook is building in Prineville, Oregon.

Submission + - Microsoft’s Creative Destruction ( 1

blitzkrieg3 writes: Dick Brass, a former Microsoft Vice President, penned a scathing critique of the corporate culture at Microsoft in a New York Times Op-Ed today. Internal power struggles kept technologies like ClearType and the Windows tablet from becoming revolutionary products. He writes:

Internal competition is common at great companies. It can be wisely encouraged to force ideas to compete. The problem comes when the competition becomes uncontrolled and destructive. At Microsoft, it has created a dysfunctional corporate culture in which the big established groups are allowed to prey upon emerging teams, belittle their efforts, compete unfairly against them for resources, and over time hector them out of existence.


Websites Still Failing Basic Privacy Practices 205

DigitAl56K writes "Large companies still can't seem to get the basics of privacy and security on the Web pulled together. Today I went to enter a competition from Duracell to win a Nintendo Wii by filling out an online form. It requires entering your full name, address, and date of birth, and then proceeds to submit it via an unencrypted HTTP POST. The ultimate irony is the message at the bottom of the page that reads: 'Trust is a cornerstone of our corporate mission, and the success of our business depends on it. P&G is committed to maintaining your trust by protecting personal information we collect.' Which websites have you found to be lacking in their basic privacy practices?"

"Love your country but never trust its government." -- from a hand-painted road sign in central Pennsylvania