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Comment: Re:~50% have no degree... (Score 4, Insightful) 171

by blazer1024 (#47522799) Attached to: For Half, Degrees In Computing, Math, Or Stats Lead To Other Jobs

I used to be a programmer with no degree. I'd like to think I was pretty darn good at it... I knew several languages (C, C++, Python, Perl, Java, and several more) that I had taught myself. I did this for about 9 years, before I finally got a degree in CS, and then got a Master's in CS shortly afterward.

One thing this did for me is open up my mind quite a bit. I'm still a good programmer, but I now know programming isn't it. There's a lot more that goes on when it comes to developing good software, and though I could code up some pretty good stuff really quickly, now my code is better, more thought out, and most importantly, I am much more likely to ask the question "Is this really the problem we're trying to solve?" leading to actually useful code instead of neat stuff it turned out really wasn't what was needed.

In addition, I'm better at interacting with people. I used to have the attitude "This makes no sense to me, therefore it's stupid" and now I realize that maybe I don't have all of the information, there's something I don't know (this is key!) which would help me understand and realize my position isn't exactly right, and so I don't just get mad and storm off anymore when things don't make sense.

Getting a degree made me a more well rounded person... I found a love for history, music and literature that I didn't quite have before. I can have conversations that don't just involve the latest tech and video games. (though I still love talking about that stuff)

I guess my point is... a degree doesn't make a great programmer, but a degree can help make a better person (which is the whole point really... it's not to "learn a trade", it's to expand your horizons and explore the world and become a critical thinker) and so given the situation, I would likely lean toward hiring a great programmer with a degree over a great programmer without one.

Comment: SC2 (Score 1) 121

by blazer1024 (#44369915) Attached to: Atari Facing $291 Million Debt Claim From... Atari

Someone already rebooted Star Control II. It was called Mass Effect. :)

I'm kidding, but seriously, go play Mass Effect 1 and compare it to SC2. There are a LOT of similarities there.

For starters, check this out:

http://aliens.wikia.com/wiki/Ur-Quan_Kzer-Za
http://masseffect.wikia.com/wiki/Thorian

Heck, the thorian's mind controlled minions are even referred to as "thralls"

Comment: Re:McDonald's undercuts parental authority? (Score 1) 145

by blazer1024 (#32690638) Attached to: McDonalds Facing Lawsuit For Happy Meal Toys

Yeah, exactly.

There's this little thing that parents seem to forget these days called "saying no".

When my daughter would ask to go to McDonald's, I would say no. She may have thrown a fit the first few times, but I didn't let it get to me. Eventually, she stopped asking.

I see so many parents say something like "Well I don't think that's a good idea..." the kids then throw a fit and they give in to avoid the screaming. All this does is teaches them that screaming gets them what they want. It's bad for you and them in the long run.

Say no when you mean no, let them have their fits but NEVER give in. In the long run, they'll give up on the fits, and you'll both be happier.

Google File System Evolves, Hadoop To Follow 53

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the i-wanna-be-like-mike dept.
Christophe Bisciglia, Google's former infrastructure guru and current member of the Cloudera start-up team, has commented on Google's latest iteration on their GFS file system and deemed its features well within the evolutionary capabilities of open-source competitor Hadoop. "Details on Google's GFS2 are slim. After all, it's Google. But based on what he's read, Bisciglia calls the update 'the next logical iteration' of the original GFS, and he sees Hadoop eventually following in the (rather sketchy) footsteps left by his former employer. 'A lot of the things Google is talking about are very logical directions for Hadoop to go,' Bisciglia tells The Reg. 'One of the things I've been very happy to see repeatedly demonstrated is that Hadoop has been able to implement [new Google GFS and MapReduce] features in approximately the same order. This shows that the fundamentals of Hadoop are solid, that the fundamentals are based on the same principles that allowed Google's systems to scale over the years.'"
Space

Strange New Objects Seen In Saturn's Rings 113

Posted by Soulskill
from the cue-monolith-jokes dept.
Every 15 Earth years, Saturn has its equinox — the time during which its rotational axis is perpendicular to the rays from the sun, so that the sun is always directly "overhead" of Saturn's equator. This is significant because Saturn's rings orbit over the equator, so during the equinox, light from the sun hits them edge-on. This means that any objects wider than the rings, or orbiting above or below them, cast long shadows and are much easier to see. For the first time, we're able to get detailed images of these objects, thanks to Cassini. A moonlet, perhaps 1,300 feet in diameter, has been discovered in the B-ring, and the Bad Astronomy blog points out another object that seems to be bursting through the F-ring. Quoting: "The upward-angled structure is definitely real, as witnessed by the shadow it's casting on the ring material to the lower left. And what's with the bright patch right where this object seems to have slammed into the rings? Did it shatter millions of icy particles, revealing their shinier interior material, making them brighter? Clearly, something awesome and amazing happened here.

Comment: Re:Page 1: Find the programming language in Window (Score 3, Interesting) 111

by blazer1024 (#28090359) Attached to: Epic's Sweeney On the PC Shareware Revolution

It's not like it's that hard to *get* a programming language for Windows, though.

Just download a copy of Visual [C++|C#|VB] and you can do all kinds of fun stuff.

Windows doesn't have a programming language at boot because it's an OS for the masses, and the masses would get confused by a "READY." prompt.

You see but you do not observe. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, in "The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes"

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