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+ - The Beatles, Bob Dylan and the 50-Year Copyright Itch

Submitted by HughPickens.com
HughPickens.com (3830033) writes "Victoria Shannon writes in the NYT that fifty years ago was a good year for music with the Beatles appearing on Billboard’s charts for the first time, the Rolling Stones releasing their first album, the Supremes with five No. 1 hits and Simon and Garfunkel releasing their debut album. The 50-year milestone is significant, because music published within the first half-century of its recording gets another 20 years of copyright protection under changes in European law. So every year since 2012, studios go through their tape vaults to find unpublished music to get it on the market before the deadline. The first year, Motown released a series of albums packed with outtakes by some of its major acts, and Sony released a limited-edition collection of 1962 outtakes by Bob Dylan, with the surprisingly frank title, “The Copyright Extension Collection, Vol. I.” In 2013, Sony released a second Dylan set, devoted to previously unreleased 1963 recordings. Similar recordings by the Beatles and the Beach Boys followed. This year, Sony is releasing a limited-edition nine-LP set of 1964 recordings by Dylan, including a 46-second try at “Mr. Tambourine Man,” which he would not complete until 1965. The Beach Boys released two copyright-extension sets of outtakes last week. And while there's no official word on a Beatles release, last year around this time, “The Beatles Bootleg Recordings 1963” turned up unannounced on iTunes."

+ - Day One Review: Elite Dangerous->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "I’ve spent the last few weeks with Elite: Dangerous (since Gamma 1.0 was released to us Kickstarters), and about four problem-free hours tonight, on launch day (and I’ll be coming back here periodically as time passes and the game grows). Probably about an hour of all of that time was spent just scrolling through the key bindings, and subsequently pressing keys on my keyboard that I rarely, if ever touch. Yes, after 30 years Elite is back, and it’s already eating my life."
Link to Original Source

+ - Lockheed Martin's 100 MW Compact Fusion Nuclear Reactor->

Submitted by Roger Pink
Roger Pink (3858149) writes "When I first heard the announcement regarding Lockheed Martin's plan to produce a compact fusion reactor (CFR) in five years, I was pretty skeptical. Then a lot of skeptical articles were written and I felt my first instinct was validated. The only problem is I think I was wrong. Having researched this story for an article I've written, I'm pretty much convinced this is actually happening.

This isn't cold fusion. Back in the late eighties a couple chemists thought they had fusion and rushed to publish out of fear of having the credit stolen. It was a complete failure of the scientific process and it set fusion back two decades. This time is different. The project leader has over a decade of experience studying and modeling fusion. The institution has a history of novel technologies and absolutely no reason to risk their credibility.

In short, it really seams like it's more likely there will be a CFR in the next ten years then not. Here's an article for a little background why:

http://insights.globalspec.com..."

Link to Original Source

+ - Critical Git security vulnerability announced

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Github has announced a security vulnerability and has encourage users to update their Git clients as soon as possible. The blog post reads in part: "A critical Git security vulnerability has been announced today, affecting all versions of the official Git client and all related software that interacts with Git repositories, including GitHub for Windows and GitHub for Mac. Because this is a client-side only vulnerability, github.com and GitHub Enterprise are not directly affected. The vulnerability concerns Git and Git-compatible clients that access Git repositories in a case-insensitive or case-normalizing filesystem. An attacker can craft a malicious Git tree that will cause Git to overwrite its own .git/config file when cloning or checking out a repository, leading to arbitrary command execution in the client machine. Git clients running on OS X (HFS+) or any version of Microsoft Windows (NTFS, FAT) are exploitable through this vulnerability. Linux clients are not affected if they run in a case-sensitive filesystem....Updated versions of GitHub for Windows and GitHub for Mac are available for immediate download, and both contain the security fix on the Desktop application itself and on the bundled version of the Git command-line client.""

Comment: Re:Nobody else seems to want it (Score 1) 727

by blane.bramble (#47718689) Attached to: Linus Torvalds: 'I Still Want the Desktop'

Sounds more like your game needed drivers - if DOS needed them, then you would expect them to be provided with the hardware, you would install them, and then your applications would use them through the OS API. The fact that you had to configure games specifically for your hardware means they were not "DOS drivers" but "game drivers".

Comment: Re:Public Lending Right (Score 1) 165

by blane.bramble (#47669407) Attached to: Why the Public Library Beats Amazon

Yes, the library buys the book, but that doesn't benefit the author much - one book will be borrowed by many people, none of whom now have to buy the book, so this is a net loss for the author. Public Lending Right compensates for this loss by making a small payment (fractions of a penny I believe in most cases) for each time a book is borrowed. This is totaled up and then paid to the authors (presumably once such payments have exceeded a certain threshold).

Comment: Re:So CentOS will be out in 2016? (Score 4, Informative) 231

by blane.bramble (#47206035) Attached to: Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Released

You are missing the whole point - the idea is that throughout the 7.x release the glibc (/ other software) version will not change, so in 10 years time your *current* software investment will still work, rather than being force to upgrade. Stability means not changing what is deployed *now* in the future. For many deployments this is crucial. If you do not need this form of long-term software stack stability, then, yes, RedHat is not for you - however there is no point criticising RedHat for a policy that is deliberately enforced for a good reason.

"Any excuse will serve a tyrant." -- Aesop

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