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Submission + - The Mac at 30: Original Reviews of Early Mac Models

snydeq writes: 30 years ago today Apple debuted the Macintosh, an iconic computer that among other things cost Steve Jobs his job. InfoWorld offers a retrospective of all the original reviews of the early Macintosh models, including the Macintosh ('will be compared to other machines not only in terms of its features but also in the light of the lavish claims and promises made by Apple co-founder Steven Jobs'), the Mac SE ('contains some radical changes, including room for a second internal drive and even a fan'), the Mac IIx ('a chorus of yawns'), and the Mac Portable ('you may develop a bad case of the wannas for this lovable [16-lb.] luggable'). Plus insights on the Macintosh II's prospects from Bill Gates: 'If you look at a product like Mac Word III on that full-page display, it's pretty awesome. ... But the corporate buyer is never going to be a strong point for Apple.'

Submission + - Wayland 1.4 Released - Touch, Sub-Surface Protocol, Crop/Scale Support (

An anonymous reader writes: Version 1.4 of the Wayland protocol and Weston reference compositor have been released. The Wayland/Weston 1,4 release delivers on many features and includes promoting the sub-surface protocol to official Wayland, improved touch screen support, a crop/scale protocol within Weston, securtity improvements, and random other fixes.
United Kingdom

Submission + - Pirate Party - Why Loz is standing in Manchester (

Ajehals writes: "Loz Kaye of the Pirate Party appeals to voters to overcome understandable cynicism and go for the opportunities on their own doorsteps:

During this year’s local elections, there was one thing I heard time and again from people I spoke to, whether on the doorstep, in their flats or on the street:

I don’t vote, because it doesn’t change anything.

It’s this sense of powerlessness over the forces that shape our lives and the space around us that is so worrying in Manchester and the UK today."


Submission + - Dead Trigger Goes free on iOS as well. What is to blame this time? (

hypnosec writes: Dead Trigger, first-person shooter game for mobiles developed by Madfinger Games, has gone free on iOS as well after it was made free on Android Play Store for reasons of rampant piracy on Android. Madfinger Games CEO Marek Rabas might not have the same reasons to blame when it comes to iDevices. iOS piracy rates are not high as compared to Android and when it comes to putting down piracy in numbers of iOS devices, it is just about 1 per cent of all iDevices out there. The CEO said, “the number of pirates on iOS is comparable with the amount of jailbroken devices." Rabas has spoken out through an article on GameZebo and points out to quite a few things about game developers, freemium models and piracy. Rabas says that in the past developers were more into developing games than being worried about piracy and how to defend against such a menace.

Submission + - Secret Nato docs leave phone hacking for dead (

mask.of.sanity writes: Hackers claim to have found sensitive Nato documents contained in a massive email haul stolen from British tabloid The Sun.

Leaders of the Anonymous activist movement are crawling through 4Gb of emails stolen from the newspaper, and say the phone hacking scandal embroiling News International, publisher of The Sun "isn't s**t" compared to what has already been uncovered.


Submission + - Peter Adekeye Freed, Judge Outraged at Cisco's (

puppetman writes: Ars Technica has an article relating the recent release of Peter Adekeye, a former Cisco employee who was arrested in Canada on trumped-up charges that appear to have been fabricated by Cisco. Slashdot covered the story back in April, 2011, during which time Mr Adekeye was still being detained.
In the ruling, the judge squashed the US extradition request, rebuked both the Canadian and American authorities for "an appalling abuse of process", and goes as far as to say that the criminal proceeding was launched on behalf of Cisco, to mirror the civil proceedings that Mr Adekeye had launched against the powerful Cisco. The full judgement, which is quite readable and damning, can be found here.


Submission + - Fines Levied by French Piracy Watchdog: € Zer (

pbahra writes: "Earlier this week, France’s anti-internet piracy police, Hadopi, presented the fruits of nine months of scanning the Web for intellectual property thieves. That works out at 470,000 first warnings, no fines, and not one Internet connection cut off. Some copyright holders, whose industry associations pay to harvest the IP addresses of alleged miscreants, are wondering whether they are getting any bang for their buck.

When it was launched in 2010, Hadopi was viewed as the big stick the music industry would use to beat French Internet pirates into submission. Now Hadopi is putting pressure on the music industry to offer up a correspondingly juicy carrot: cheap and easy to use Web sites where songs can be downloaded legally."

Open Source

Submission + - SPDX sets new standard for SW license info xchange (

StoneLion writes: Get ready for SPDX! The first version of Software Package Data Exchange (SPDX) project is set for release next month. It promises a standard format for license and copyright information that can be included with a project's code. If it catches on, it solves an annoying problem for developers who'd rather code than track licensing legalities.

Radioactive cats have 18 half-lives.