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Comment: Re:Can it run apps from the Google app store? (Score 1) 106

by PitaBred (#49746887) Attached to: Asus ZenFone 2 Performance Sneak Peek With Intel Z3580 Inside

ARM v4, v5, v6, v7, v8... ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A... ) all have different extension sets, as well as x86 having it's subset of extensions, and various devices adding on different other devices and such. It's a pretty big set, and there's no end in sight. It's better to let a compiler inquire what extensions a device supports instead of trying to compile for the upteen various current and future OS/architecture combinations, or they can just leave the device to decide what's best for itself.

Comment: Re:Can it run apps from the Google app store? (Score 1) 106

by PitaBred (#49745187) Attached to: Asus ZenFone 2 Performance Sneak Peek With Intel Z3580 Inside

Not all ARMs are the same. Overall yes, but each version of the processor has it's own various extended instruction sets and such. So Google could compile it for every possible chip and instruction combination, or just farm that job out to the phones themselves to make the best decision locally.

Comment: Re:Can it run apps from the Google app store? (Score 1) 106

by PitaBred (#49745081) Attached to: Asus ZenFone 2 Performance Sneak Peek With Intel Z3580 Inside

But this article and the original comment are about the ZenFone 2, which is specifically running Lollipop. So it has the ART runtime, and JIT is not happening on it, and the OP was asking about things being compiled for this non-ARM architecture.

Notwithstanding all that, I have a Dell Venue 7 that's also got an x86 chip in it, it gets very reasonable battery life, and performs perfectly fine. I don't think I've found a single app that hasn't worked with it, either, including many games and such. I've got a Zenfone 2 on order to replace my aging HTC One M7, I'm reasonably certain that it'll behave quite well.

Comment: Re:Nope... (Score 1) 284

by PitaBred (#49722231) Attached to: The Auto Industry May Mimic the 1980s PC Industry

And yet newer cars with all their complexity are both more powerful and more efficient. The 1960's Mustangs had a base 3.3L engine that put out 120HP. The 2013 Corolla has a 1.8L engine that puts out 132HP. Or if you talk upgrades, the 4.7L big-ass engine put out 271HP. The current 5.0L Mustang engine can put out 435HP. And all of the new engines get better mileage.

Comment: Re:So, we're going to get Toyota clones? (Score 1) 284

by PitaBred (#49721937) Attached to: The Auto Industry May Mimic the 1980s PC Industry

Your Arduino isn't keeping tabs on battery condition and charge, road conditions, climate control, entertainment system, etc. Even a non-electric vehicle has hundreds of thousands of lines of code with all the ECU's and such that communicate error conditions in various components.

Comment: Re:Oh please (Score 1) 284

by PitaBred (#49721915) Attached to: The Auto Industry May Mimic the 1980s PC Industry

You can't do that already? I mean, it may take some knowledge and elbow grease, or paying someone else to do it, but it's very easy to replace most vehicle's infotainment systems, and even preserve the existing capabilities while extending them. $400 or so later and my 2005 Yukon now has a touch-screen with a backup camera, and it still uses the steering wheel controls that were stock with the car.

Comment: Re:Men's Rights morons (Score 1) 773

Still, when you look at some proxy variables for discrimination, such as imprisonment, homelessness, victimization rates in violence, suicide rates and average lifespan it's quite interesting how most groups suffering discrimination are overrepresented in those negative outcomes. Except when it comes to women vs. men, when apparently women are so discriminated against, yet somehow seem to avoid actually suffering from the worst outcomes that usually follow such discrimination.

But well, hey, they're not as well represented on corporate boards, which most men are.

Comment: Re:So like Japan? (Score 3, Insightful) 950

Smaller families, more invested in each child, less social interaction because of the child-abducting boogeymen (even though they are statistically insignificant and getting more so with each year). We've got a generation of kids that are growing up inside and not learning how to interact with people in non-sterile environments. When forced to deal with people that they can't just hit block on or ignore, they freeze up. Socialization is very much downplayed in our current culture, and it's apparently sorely needed by many.

Don't take this as me saying they have to like everyone they meet. But you do have to learn some basic "get along with each other" skills that I'm finding many kids lack any more.

Comment: Re:Compares well (Score 2) 408

No-fault is about taking money away from lawyers, who used to litigate each and every auto accident as a lawsuit in court before the insurers would pay. Eventually the insurers decided that they spent more on lawyers than accident payments, and they had no reason to do so.

If you want to go back to the way things were, you are welcome to spend lots of time and money in court for trivial things, and see how you like it. I will provide you with expert witness testimony for $7.50/minute plus expenses. The lawyers charge more.

In general your insurer can figure out for themselves if you were at fault or not, and AAA insurance usually tells me when they think I was, or wasn't, when they set rates.

Comment: Re:More than $100 (Score 1) 515

If we don't have more than two children per couple, the human race would've died out a long time ago.

I think the proper way to state that is "If we didn't in the past", not "If we don't". If we were to have 2 children per couple (approximately, the real value is enough children to replace each individual but not more) from this day on, it would not be necessary to adjust the number upward to avoid a population bottleneck for tens of thousands of years.

In the sciences, we are now uniquely priviledged to sit side by side with the giants on whose shoulders we stand. -- Gerald Holton

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