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Comment: Re:NO gig-e low # ports and pci bus for most of th (Score 1) 344

by bjelkeman (#31974574) Attached to: Open Source Router To Replace WRT54GL?

I have fibre to my house connected to the 2 Gbit ring that my local government owns (i.e. I am a co-owner of this). I subscribe to a 100 mpbs service on my fibre and when I connect a laptop directly to the fibre hub I get over 85-90 mbps download speed. I am not sure why I didn't get full upload speed during these tests, but it doesn't bother me too much.

Now I am connected through a Buffalo Technology WHR-HP-G54 WIFI router, running Tomato Firmware so the actual throughput in the Buffalo is never more than about 40 mbps. But even when my s/w development team is here in the house, all 12 of them, nobody ever complains over bandwidth. (But we don't run torrrents all of us normally.)

Here is a link to an online test result: http://www.speedtest.net/result/264255518.png

I live in a suburb of Stockholm, Sweden. Our local government has built the local fibre infrastructure and I can subscribe to 100 mbps IP services from four different ISPs for about US$33/month.

Comment: Re:Missing Option (Score 1) 256

by bjelkeman (#31530356) Attached to: I've originated Q Wikipedia articles, where Q =

Yes indeed.

We did the same. Launched our own wiki. As we were uncertain if we could keep our content "relevant" enough for Wikipedia editors.
Not original research, but with the support of an editor on staff.

By water and IT geeks for better living for the other half of the world population.
http://www.akvopedia.org/

Technology

Using EMP To Punch Holes In Steel 165

Posted by timothy
from the you'll-need-some-big-batteries dept.
angrytuna writes "The Economist is running a story about a group of researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Machine Tools and Forming Technology in Chemnitz, Germany, who've found a way to use an EMP device to shape and punch holes through steel. The process enjoys advantages over both lasers, which take more time to bore the hole (0.2 vs. 1.4 seconds), and by metal presses, which can leave burrs that must be removed by hand."
Earth

+ - Solving the Energy Crisis by Tripling Electricity-> 2

Submitted by DeviceGuru
DeviceGuru (1136715) writes "Sounds crazy, but as with all of University of Cambridge Prof. David J. C. MacKay's thinking, there's logic to back it up, along with a welcome dollop of British wit. His new book, "Sustainable Energy Without the Hot Air" (available free online and in hard copy and released under a Creative Commons license), is a roadmap for kicking our fossil fuel habit. Along the way, MacKay demolishes "codswallop" arguments on both sides of the debate, and explains why tripling electricity demand is the solution. In MacKay's holistic approach, transportation and space heating move from fossil fuels to renewable electricity. The beauty of consuming very large amounts of extra electricity for transport and heating is that these two forms of demand are "easily-switch-off-and-on-able," MacKay says. A smart grid that controls vehicle charging and pumping into heat-stores matches demand to renewables' fluctuating supply, overcoming one of their biggest drawbacks. A recent review in Science magazine (PDF download) calls the book "a must-read analysis" and "found MacKay's book by turns exhilarating and terrifying.""
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Everquest 1 Secret Cat Room (Score 1) 261

by bjelkeman (#28301465) Attached to: Videogame Places You're Not Supposed To Go

Swimming across Lake Rathe I used to occasionally fall through the cracks between the water texture tiles. Disturbing when it happened as the perspective changed abruptly and unexpectedly. Normally you would fall for some time and then end up zoning to a safe spot close to South Karana zone line.

Patents

+ - Orphan 70-Year-Old Plane Data = 'Trade Secrets'?

Submitted by Anonymous Flyboy Coward
Anonymous Flyboy Coward (666) writes "The Experimental Aircraft Association is taking on the Federal Aviation Administration, which has denied a FOIA request for access to construction data to the owner of 70+ year old antique Fairchild F45 aircraft. The FAA sided with a company that was formed in 1990 (and which didn't even know the airplane type existed until the FAA's inquiry) that claims it "owns" the design and manufacturing data to the aircraft, calling the data a "trade secret". The company failed to register with the FAA (as required by law) yet the FAA is standing by it's assertion that they "own" this data, which was turned over to the public domain in the 1950s. Many vintage aircraft owners face a Catch-22 situation: they are required by law to perform maintenance to the manufacturer's specs, but much of this data is unavailable because the FAA refuses to release it without the data's owner's permission... even if there is no such owner. The decision in this case will likely have wide-ranging implications on FOIA requests, as well as affect whether historical antique aircraft will remain flyable or lost forever to a pointless bureaucratic death. The full story is available here."
Software

+ - RIAA's "Expert" Witness Testimony Now Onl

Submitted by
NewYorkCountryLawyer
NewYorkCountryLawyer writes "The online community now has an opportunity to see the fruits of its labor. Back in December, the Slashdot ("What Questions Would You Ask an RIAA "Expert"?") and Groklaw ("Another Lawyer Would Like to Pick Your Brain, Please") communities were asked for their input on possible questions to pose to the RIAA's "expert", Dr. Doug Jacobson of Iowa State University, who was scheduled to be deposed in February in UMG v. Lindor, for the first time in any RIAA case. Ms. Lindor's lawyers were flooded with about 1400 responses. The deposition of Dr. Jacobson went forward on February 23, 2007, and the transcript is now available online (pdf). For those who would like an ASCII text version they can cut and paste, go here. Ray Beckerman, one of Ms. Lindor's attorneys, had this comment: "We are deeply grateful to the community for reviewing our request, for giving us thoughts and ideas, and for reviewing other readers' responses. Now I ask the tech community to review this all-important transcript, and bear witness to the shoddy "investigation" and 'junk science' upon which the RIAA has based its litigation war against the people. The computer scientists among you will be astounded that the RIAA has been permitted to burden our court system with cases based upon such arrant and careless nonsense.""
United States

+ - Growth of e-waste may lead to national 'e-fee'

Submitted by
jcatcw
jcatcw writes "A bill in Congress would add a recycling charge to the cost of laptop PCs, computer monitors, televisions and some other electronic devices, according to a story at Computerworld. The effort to control what's called e-waste could lead to a national "e-fee" that would be paid just like a sales tax. Nationwide the cost could amount to $300 million per year. Already, California, Washington, Maryland and Maine have approved electronics recycling laws, and another 21 states plus Puerto Rico, are considering them."

There is nothing so easy but that it becomes difficult when you do it reluctantly. -- Publius Terentius Afer (Terence)

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