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+ - 5 year old passed Microsoft Certified Professional

Submitted by EzInKy
EzInKy writes: The BBC has this heartwarming story about a five year old British boy who is the youngest Microsoft Certified Professional.

He told the BBC he found the exam difficult but enjoyable, and hopes to set up a UK-based tech hub one day.

"There were multiple choice questions, drag and drop questions, hotspot questions and scenario-based questions," he told the BBC Asian Network.

"The hardest challenge was explaining the language of the test to a five-year-old. But he seemed to pick it up and has a very good memory," explained Ayan's father Asim.

Ayan says he hopes to launch a UK-based IT hub similar to America's Silicon Valley one day, which he intends to call E-Valley.

Comment: Re:Scripting language du jour (Score 1) 547

by biodata (#48104077) Attached to: Goodbye, World? 5 Languages That Might Not Be Long For This World
The more I see of python the less I like it. Every time I try to install some python package there is some incompatibility with the system python, or some wierdness in compiling the underlying libraries, and I have to maintain several versions of the language. For some reason it doesn't seem to be backward-compatible, which leads me to question the sanity of whoever decided to make it that way. It is way worse than perl that at least 'just works' a lot more of the time. Maybe it's just me?
Perl

Goodbye, World? 5 Languages That Might Not Be Long For This World 547

Posted by timothy
from the glib-claims-are-easy-to-make dept.
Nerval's Lobster writes As developers embrace new programming languages, older languages can go one of two ways: stay in use, despite fading popularity, or die out completely. So which programming languages are slated for history's dustbin of dead tech? Perl is an excellent candidate, especially considering how work on Perl6, framed as a complete revamp of the language, began work in 2000 and is still inching along in development. Ruby, Visual Basic.NET, and Object Pascal also top this list, despite their onetime popularity. Whether the result of development snafus or the industry simply veering in a direction that makes a particular language increasingly obsolete, time comes for all platforms at one point or another. Which programming languages do you think will do the way of the dinosaurs in coming years? With COBOL still around, it's hard to take too seriously the claim that Perl or Ruby is about to die. A prediction market for this kind of thing might yield a far different list.

We don't know one millionth of one percent about anything.

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