Slashdot is powered by your submissions, so send in your scoop

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Submission + - SPAM: Unemployment Extension – Some basic Informat

patitani writes: In our world, the number of people is increasing from day to day and the number of works or jobs for people is also increasing; however the density of people who have the jobs and people who have no jobs varies from regions to regions. The factors of the increasing of the unemployment rate are partly due to the country economy, population and the political situation. As we all know that employment is refer to people who have the jobs and unemployment is about people who have no jobs.
Link to Original Source
Patents

Submission + - Samsung court win against Apple in Netherlands (techworld.com.au)

angry tapir writes: "The Court of Appeal in The Hague has ruled that the Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 is sufficiently different from Apple's European design patent that the tablet can remain on sale in the Netherlands. One of Apple's core legal claims against Samsung is that its rival copied the design of Apple's products. Apple has argued that it's no coincidence that Samsung's latest products look a lot like the iPhone and iPad, from the shape of the hardware to the user interface and even the packaging."
Software

Submission + - Adobe Download Manager Installing Without Consent

adeelarshad82 writes: Not all is worth cheering about as Adobe turns 20. Researcher Aviv Raff has found a problem in ADM (Adobe Download Manager) and the method through which it is delivered from adobe.com. The net effect of the problem is that a user can be tricked into downloading and installing software using ADM without actual consent. Tonight Adobe acknowledged the report and said they were working on the issue with Raff and NOS Microsystems, the company that wrote ADM.
Security

Submission + - Wife Exposes chief spy's personal life on Facebook (dailymail.co.uk)

Dr_Ken writes: "From a news story in the (U.K.) Daily Mail: "The new head of MI6 has been left exposed by a major personal security breach after his wife published intimate photographs and family details on the Facebook website. Sir John Sawers is due to take over as chief of the Secret Intelligence Service in November, putting him in charge of all Britain's spying operations abroad. But his wife's entries on the social networking site have exposed potentially compromising details about where they live and work, who their friends are and where they spend their holidays.""
Security

Submission + - iPhone SMS Vulnerability Gives Hackers Root Access (infoworld.com)

snydeq writes: "Pwn2Own winner Charlie Miller has revealed an SMS vulnerability that could provide hackers with root access to the iPhone. Malicious code sent by SMS to run on the phone could include commands to monitor location using GPS, turn on the phone's microphone to eavesdrop on conversations, or make the phone join a DDoS attack or botnet, Miller said. Miller did not provide detailed description of the SMS vulnerability, citing an agreement with Apple, which is working to fix the vulnerability in advance of Black Hat, where Miller plans to discuss the attack in greater detail. 'SMS is a great vector to attack the iPhone,' Miller said, as SMS can send binary code that the iPhone processes without user interaction. Sequences can be sent to the phone as multiple messages that are automatically reassembled, thereby surpassing individual SMS message limits of 140 bytes."
Java

Submission + - Oracle, Do The Right Thing, Set Java Free (openenterprisenews.com)

AlexGr writes: "To nearly everyone's surprise, the Department of Justice's Antitrust Division has thrown a last-minute banana peel in front of Larry Ellison's bid to buy Sun and Java. In Open Enterprise News, Jeff Gould contends that the Java community has a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to wrest some concessions from the new owner of Java before the deal is set in stone. http://openenterprisenews.com/analysis/oracle-do-the-right-thing-set-java-free.html"
Security

New Click-Fraud Attack Is Stealthiest Yet 99

An anonymous reader sends news from The Washington Post's Security Fix blog of a new Trojan horse program that takes click fraud to the next level. The Trojan, dubbed FFsearcher by SecureWorks, was among the pieces of malware installed by sites hacked with the Nine-Ball mass compromise, which attacked some 40,000 Web sites this month. The Trojan takes advantage of Google's "AdSense for Search" API, which allows Web sites to embed Google search results alongside the usual Google AdSense ads. (SecureWorks' writeup indicates that Yahoo search is targeted too, but the researchers saw no evidence if the malware redirecting Yahoo searches.) While most search hijackers give themselves away on the victim's machine by redirecting the browser through some no-name search engine, FFsearcher "...converts every search a victim makes through Google.com, so that each query is invisibly redirected through the attackers' own Web sites, via Google's Custom Search API. Meanwhile, the Trojan manipulates the victim's PC and browser so that the victim never actually sees the attacker-controlled Web site that is hijacking the search, but instead sees the search results as though they were returned directly from Google.com (and with Google.com in the victim browser's address bar, not the address of the attacker controlled site). Adding to the stealth is the fact that search results themselves aren't altered by the attackers, who are merely going after the referral payments should victims click on any of the displayed ads. What's more, the attackers aren't diverting clicks or ad revenue away from advertisers or publishers, as in traditional click fraud: They are simply forcing Google to pay commissions that it wouldn't otherwise have to pay." If FFSearcher were the only piece of malware on the machine, it would have a better chance of staying under the radar.
Windows

One Year Later, "Dead" XP Still Going Strong 538

snydeq writes "Microsoft pulled the plug on Windows XP a year ago today, no longer selling new copies in most venues. Yet according to a report from InfoWorld, various downgrade paths to XP are keeping the operating system very much alive, particularly among businesses. In fact, despite Microsoft trumpeting Vista as the most successful version of Windows ever sold, more than half of business PCs have subsequently downgraded Vista-based machines to XP, according to data provided by community-based performance-monitoring network of PCs. Microsoft recently planned to further limit the ability to downgrade to XP now that Windows 7 is in the pipeline, but backlash against the licensing scheme prompted the company to change course, extending downgrade rights on new PCs from April 2010 to April 2011."

Slashdot Top Deals

Doubt is not a pleasant condition, but certainty is absurd. - Voltaire

Working...