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Comment: Re:The U. S. of A. does not operate in this mode (Score 1) 803

by bhiestand (#46780799) Attached to: Study Finds US Is an Oligarchy, Not a Democracy

I agree. I haven't looked up the numbers, but my memory tells me there was a slight majority in favor of OIF.

My point was "US Congress approved" and "US public backed" are entirely unrelated statements. So if you meant to use the former as evidence of the latter, in comments on THIS article, that's relevant (and a bit amusing). If not, I suspect you're right on both counts.

Comment: Re:Are you kidding (Score 1) 803

by bhiestand (#46780595) Attached to: Study Finds US Is an Oligarchy, Not a Democracy

The pro life argument is generally not that the woman should be punished, but that abortion is the taking of a life and therefore murder. The vast majority of the pro life movement is not okay with murder (that's exactly what they are fighting against!)

And yet I am quite confident the vast majority of "pro-life"ers:
- support the death penalty
- oppose food stamps
- have not adopted

The old line about only being pro-life until the baby is born still rings true.

Comment: Re:The U. S. of A. does not operate in this mode (Score 1) 803

by bhiestand (#46780517) Attached to: Study Finds US Is an Oligarchy, Not a Democracy

That is a load of bull. The US Congress approved...military action to remove Saddam from power. The US public backed both actions at the time.

I'm not sure if you meant those as related statements, but it's worth pointing out that TFA essentially says "Congress is rarely affected by public opinion".

Comment: Re:Tracking` (Score 1) 233

by bhiestand (#46681729) Attached to: Most Expensive Aviation Search: $53 Million To Find Flight MH370

My estimate of the data costs was from an interview with the man who created this proposed enhanced black box. I think he knows more than either of us what the data requirements of his device are.

He may be a great engineer, but if he's seriously proposing a system that will cost $20/passenger/flight, he's a fool. At that price, it had better guarantee incident-free flight.

Comment: Re:correlation does not prove causation (Score 1) 137

by bhiestand (#46677575) Attached to: Study: Exposure To Morning Sunlight Helps Managing Weight

I'm fat and I get up at 6:00 and am generally at work before the sun comes up. It must be because I'm lazy, and not because I commute and work stupid hours.

Well, you are too lazy to change your sig :). It's not an XP world anymore! Hell, it's even been looking a bit like a Mac world for the last few years.

Comment: Re:Lies (Score 1) 544

by bhiestand (#46661891) Attached to: 60 Minutes Dubbed Engines Noise Over Tesla Model S

I was in the audience for a sitcom episode where the actors just couldn't get their lines straight. Watching them mess up horribly for multiple takes wasn't as bad as it sounded. The actors made fun of themselves/each other, made other jokes, and generally just made it all amusing. When they finally got it, it was somehow quite funny.

Of course, they could always move laughs around with a little editing.

Comment: Re:No (Score 1) 824

by bhiestand (#46643233) Attached to: Some Mozilla Employees Demand New CEO Step Down

Did you have direct authority over people who would have reason to believe that those donations indicated your personal prejudice against them?

At some, I had direct authority over people. And those progressive organizations were in pretty strong legal+ethical conflict with the organizations I have worked for.

Some of the people I directly supervised were extremely conservative... they would likely [wrongly] consider my funding of Prop 8 opposition a direct attack on their religious freedom. I know my moral stance is the right one, but I am glad we had a culture of "what you do in your off hours is fine as long as you don't involve our organization"

Comment: Re:Tarzan need antecedent (Score 1) 824

by bhiestand (#46611227) Attached to: Some Mozilla Employees Demand New CEO Step Down

If I work 9-5, and at 5:01 start telling customers that my CEO should be fired because he's a pinko commie, I would expect to be told to find a new job

I also feel management should be fired if they attempt to fire employees for political activities during their off hours.

Telling people that your CEO should be fired because he's a pink commie after 5:01 is political activities during their off hours.

It's also a political activity, yes, but I think it goes well beyond that. I can't find the right words at the moment, but I'm sure you can see the difference. If the CEO was also the mayor, an employee running a campaign to defeat him in the election would be fine. The employee running a campaign to turn public support against the CEO in an effort to get him fired/pressured to step down? Not okay.

Comment: Re:No (Score 1) 824

by bhiestand (#46604587) Attached to: Some Mozilla Employees Demand New CEO Step Down

My boss? A mere difference of opinion is fine as long as we can be adult about it. If he has publicly called for me and people like me to be stripped of rights and made second class citizens AND put his personal money into helping to make that happen, anyone with half a brain should be able to figure out that there's a high potential for a problem there.

Maybe I'm missing something, but my understanding is that he did not publicly call for anything. He privately donated money to campaigns (which I despise), but TFA and this thread make no mention of any other activity.

I have worked for extremely conservative organizations while donating to the ACLU, FSF, Planned Parenthood, Courage Campaign, and many others. Should they have had the right to fire me if those donations became public knowledge?

Comment: Re:Tarzan need antecedent (Score 1) 824

by bhiestand (#46604259) Attached to: Some Mozilla Employees Demand New CEO Step Down

Only with the fact that he was objecting -- publicly -- ABOUT his boss's politics, whatever they happen to be.

You seem to think you are the feudal lord rather than one signatory to a contract. Does the contract you signed with your employee say that he doesn't have the right to discuss your politics?

Really? I think you're misrepresenting the GP.

And yes, if an employee of mine made public comments about not wanting me as CEO because of my politics, I would show him the door in an instant.

While I wouldn't agree with instant/automatic firing, this is about bringing politics to your workplace. And that's fair. If I work 9-5, and at 5:01 start telling customers that my CEO should be fired because he's a pinko commie, I would expect to be told to find a new job. Employees publicly calling for their CEO's resignation because of their [legal] political activities are childish at best.

For the record, I also feel management should be fired if they attempt to fire employees for political activities during their off hours.

Comment: Re:You Will Be Surprised (Score 1) 870

by bhiestand (#46589115) Attached to: Job Automation and the Minimum Wage Debate

The consequence of this is that everyone who derives their income from labor rather than return on capital is screwed. There are only two choices: invest enough to become financially independent (and hope that you can do it before you lose your career to automation), or hope that society sees fit to redistribute wealth so that those without control of capital don't starve.

The catch-22 is that the people whose occupations are most in danger from automation are also those with the lowest capacity for investing...

I've reached the same conclusions, but it is worth noting a few points that should alter the outcome:

  • the whole system is unsustainable without a sufficient wealth base to sustain consumption
  • those who control capital do not yet fully control the state
  • serious alternatives (e.g. minimum income) have been proposed to deal with these issues while allowing markets to continue functioning

I find it extremely likely that those in power will ultimately realize that they are better off when the needs of all are met, enabling a compromise wherein some form of minimum income/welfare ensures comfort for all. The transition could be smooth, or it could be bloody, but I don't see how it's avoidable in the long-run.

Historically, this is the progression we have observed in the welfare state.

Comment: Re:Correct me if I'm wrong... (Score 1) 298

by bhiestand (#46576487) Attached to: Iran Builds Mock-up of Nimitz-Class Aircraft Carrier

Given the current state of the world, can you really foresee no possible scenarios where dogfighting might be necessary?

So the military is to not just face any likely threat, but every possible threat, no matter how unlikely. The military is already about the same as the rest of the world combined. How much more do you think we need?

I can't tell if you're trolling or just... nevermind.

Clearly that is not what I believe. And I am quite sure you know that.

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