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Comment: Re:money is not the way (Score 3, Interesting) 497

by bfizzle (#26773563) Attached to: How Do I Start a University Transition To Open Source?

I've seen this happen as well too.

I seriously doubt the OP will be able to justify the move the OSS. Your Microsoft rep will drop the cost of all your software purchases with a Campus Agreement to below what it would cost your university to use OSS.

OSS isn't free. There is the costs of training and implementation... and finding well qualified employees to run your systems will not be easy on a education budget. Don't forget support costs!!!

I'd highly recommend calling your Microsoft rep and start negotiating. I doubt you'll be able to justify OSS to management. What you will be able to do is get a campus agreement and provide software to your whole campus community and pick up premier support for your sysads for close to what you are already paying.

I will warn you that you are moving into Microsoft's subscription model doing this, but you will win concessions by doing this.

Comment: Re:The thing is... (Score 1) 570

by bfizzle (#26747567) Attached to: The Case For Supporting and Using Mono

Gee thank you for the informative post. I'm sure Java has ways to compile to native machine code and other tricks to optimize run times...

But the nice part about .NET is optimization is built into the system. No need to be a guru, your hello world application will be compiled to native code. Not to say your crappy code is optimized... but that is a completely different story.

Comment: Re:about time.. (Score 2, Interesting) 221

by bfizzle (#25483047) Attached to: Microsoft Working For Samba Interoperability

Does it not seem odd to you that the only competitor for Windows file sharing recommended here is a open source clone of the same technology they are trying to replace?

There is a reason why Windows servers are so popular and it is no one makes directory services, file sharing, group policy, and email/calendaring as easy as Microsoft. Microsoft has been so successful at creating these services and making them simple to administer that most open source projects try to emulate/replicate/duplicate what already has been done.

So stay up on your soap box saying how much better the open source version is...

Mars

+ - More Martian Water Evidence

Submitted by tubapro12
tubapro12 (896596) writes "NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter has detected light-toned bedrock on Mars occurring in an alternating pattern with darker bedrock within a rift valley. Researchers at the University of Arizona point to this as a product of a liquid, probably water, passing through the rocks.

"On Earth, bleaching of rock surrounding a fracture is a clear indication of chemical interactions between fluids circulating within the fracture and the host rock," Okubo and co-author Alfred S. McEwen reported in the paper. The researchers also said that layered outcrops can indicate cycles with materials deposited by regular episodes of water, wind or volcanic activity.
"
Science

Scientists Dubious of Quantum Computing Claims 107

Posted by Zonk
from the little-salt-with-your-quantum dept.
Dollaz wrote with a link to the International Business Times, which questions the authenticity of D-Wave's Quantum computing. We discussed the 'Sudoku playing' computer yesterday, but scientists in the field have expressed a lot of distrust of the company's findings. The machine was not available for inspection during or after the demo, and even if the technology was working as intended there is some doubt that it can be scaled. The article points out that "notwithstanding lofty claims in the company's press release about creating the world's first commercial quantum computer, D-Wave Chief Executive Herb Martin emphasized that the machine is not a true quantum computer and is instead a kind of special-purpose machine that uses some quantum mechanics to solve problems." Good to see people in the field questioning 'breakthroughs'.
Security

+ - Wanted: 160 Missing FBI Laptops

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "The FBI had at least 160 laptops lost or stolen over the past four years, including 10 that contained highly sensitive classified information and at least one that held "personal identifying information" on FBI personnel, according to a report released today by a Justice Department oversight arm. The report found that 51 of the laptops reported lost or stolen may have contained classified data, but that FBI didn't have enough information to say conclusively. The Washington Post notes that only one of the cases documented in the report indicated that the data contained on the lost laptop was protected with encryption technology."

The meta-Turing test counts a thing as intelligent if it seeks to devise and apply Turing tests to objects of its own creation. -- Lew Mammel, Jr.

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