Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:Wait, what? (Score 2) 303

by berj (#48170201) Attached to: OS X 10.10 Yosemite Review

The purpose of a computer -- as opposed to some other tool -- is that it has the flexibility (by being programmed) to do many different things, including things conceived of by nobody but the user. A computer that can't be programmed is fundamentally not fit for purpose. Apple is selling devices that they have intentionally broken.

So that's the *purpose* of every single computer you own? Bully for you. That is not the purpose of every single computer *I* own. And I guarantee you it's not the purpose of every single computer most people own. What's more your statement is false on its face. iPads, etc *can* be programmed -- by anyone with the skill and tools to do so. You just need specific hardware and software and services in order to do so. Just because you're not willing to tool up for the task doesn't make it Apple's problem. It's your problem and nobody else's. I'm sure there are many tasks I can't make my iPad do even with all the effort and knowledge in the world.. but hey.. I can't make my car fly like and aeroplane either. That's life.

Comment: Fine on iPhone 5 and iPad Air (Score 4, Informative) 504

by berj (#47959795) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Is iOS 8 a Pig?

I've got it on an iPhone 5 and an iPad Air and both work very smoothly. Haven't had any OS crashes or glitches (a couple apps are a bit more crashy but I hope an update from them will fix that) and speed and battery life don't seem to have had any reduction.

So far the things that make iOS 8 really attractive (handoff, continuity, new document picker) are waiting for either Yosemite or updated apps so I wait patiently but am satisfied with the upgrade as far as it goes

Comment: Re:App permissions (Score 1) 333

by berj (#46338557) Attached to: How Mobile Apps Are Reinventing the Worst of the Software Industry

There's nothing to understand or care about.. If an app wants access to my contacts it needs to ask me. If I say no then it doesn't get access. If I say yes.. it does. The answer from the first request is remembered. If I want/need to change my answer I can go into settings and do so. But by default an application exists in a state of "can't access anything until the user approves".

I'm not sure how much easier it could possibly get for a user.

My main complaint is that there aren't enough categories. At the very least I want the ability to say which apps can and cannot access the network (both wifi and cellular.. preferably with separate permissions).

Comment: Re:Still like to have more then 1 port in side the (Score 2, Insightful) 234

by berj (#45831803) Attached to: Apple's New Mac Pro Gets High Repairability Score

Why is it a joke? The 256GB is perfect for my needs. We only put the OS and applications and various caches on the local drive of any of our machines (Linux or Mac OS). The rest (about 200-ish terabytes) is network attached.

I think your definition of "pro" is different from mine.

Comment: Loving not having cable. (Score 1) 261

by berj (#45704319) Attached to: Streaming and Cord-Cutting Take a Toll On the Pay-TV Industry

I don't remember the last time I actually had cable service. Maybe 10 years ago. Back then I rented a lot of DVDs and went out to movies. I'm quite happy these days to watch what's available on netflix and iTunes. I love not having to put up with commercials and for the most part I can watch what I want when I want and even where I want. I haven't done the math but given the number of shows I watch in a year I can't see my investment in iTunes content and my netflix membership adding up to anything close to a year of cable bills. Even if it did the convenience factor is more than enough to make up for it.

Comment: Re:Yep (Score 1) 488

by berj (#44922563) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Is iOS 7 Slow?

With the exception of mail I *was* using third party apps (google maps, iCab mobile and corus radio in this particular instance)

None of the tasks I was doing had anything to do with "background notifications". Radio and nav were running properly in the background.

It is wrong always, everywhere and for everyone to believe anything upon insufficient evidence. - W. K. Clifford, British philosopher, circa 1876

Working...