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Comment: Compromise? (Score 1) 243

by Ben Blais (#47918645) Attached to: AT&T Proposes Net Neutrality Compromise
This proposed "compromise" does not actually strike some middle ground, it just changes who pays for the prioritization. Who's to say that ISPs won't slow the "regular lanes" down so much that customers will be forced to buy bandwidth for specific websites. This also allows for abuse such as slowing all websites down to the slowest speed possible (dropping 99.99% of the packets) and saying "we're not blocking it see we're letting one packet through" them. Additionally, this wold allow them to artificially block websites, again, claiming they are still allowing a connection to them because they are not dropping the 0.001% of packets sent and not allow a higher tier connection speed, something that could easily happen with comcast, as they sell television content just like netflix.

Comment: Innovation (Score 4, Insightful) 225

by Ben Blais (#46468563) Attached to: Silicon Valley's Youth Problem
The fact that you compare working for and established company to "curing cancer" and going to work for a start-up as "developing a sexting app" shows little knowledge of what start-up and established companies are actually doing. The fact of the matter is, working for a larger established company usually consists of maintaining or making trivial enhancements to existing software with the occasional new product being developed. Working for a start-up, however, usually includes a rampant amount of innovation simply because start-ups don't have much money to advertise their new products. The result result of this is they have a need to develop more interesting and innovative products in order to be able to compete with established companies. Another thing worth mentioning is the diversity that start-ups usually have, need I remind you that Tesla motors was a start-up, and many of the technologies, including some which show promise of curing cancer, were also developed at start-ups.

I cannot conceive that anybody will require multiplications at the rate of 40,000 or even 4,000 per hour ... -- F. H. Wales (1936)

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