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Slashdot's Disagree Mail 426 Screenshot-sm

Posted by samzenpus
from the unsubscribe-me dept.
Everyone likes to belong to something. Whether it be for fun, a sense of belonging, or a need for attention, a group gives you a feeling of solidarity. Surrounding yourself with people that share common goals and ideas can be comforting. Sometimes however, you realize that you hate the people you've surrounded yourself with. Your religion doesn't allow you to read anything that has profanity or you've subscribed to Slashdot thinking you could learn more about hockey. This week's collection is composed of people who don't want to play, read, or be associated with us anymore. Read below to find out how bad they want out.
Government

+ - Federal Bureau without Internet access since 2001-> 1

Submitted by
Paul Flannery
Paul Flannery writes "The federal Bureau of Indian Affairs has been without Internet access since 2001 thanks to a ruling in a civil trial. This is very important for the Commonwealth for the Massachusetts as the bureau can rule if the Mashpee Wampanoag tribe can open a casino and circumvent the commonwealth. "It impacts our job," said Bureau spokesman Gary Garrison. "When we put out a news release we have to spend an hour and a half at a fax machine faxing to our list.""
Link to Original Source
Security

+ - Breaking the Law with WHOIS data->

Submitted by daviddcawley
daviddcawley (1194623) writes "Spam fighter David Ritz investigated a suspected spammer by using typical tools. He was sued by this person and the judge's finding documents are available here. I'm shocked by the decision but I guess it comes down to a lack of understanding of the interweb and it's complex network of pipes"
Link to Original Source
The Courts

+ - EFF: Lawyer Trademarks "Cyberlaw" ->

Submitted by
BigTimOBrien
BigTimOBrien writes "Corynne McSherry writes: "Eric Menhart may call himself a cyberlawyer, but we think he has a lot of learn about cyberlaw — and common sense. Menhart is the author of a blog about cyberlaw issues called, logically if not innovatively, "Cyberlawg." (As he says in the top right corner, "Cyberlawg = Cyberlaw + blog.") And he is "principal attorney" in a firm called "CyberLaw P.C." OK, OK, we get it, he practices technology law. Based on this, he's applied for a trademark on the use of the term "cyberlaw" in connection with the practice of, um, cyberlaw. That's like a soda company claiming a trademark in the use of the word soda in connection with the sale of soda. Or an apple farmer claiming a trademark in the use of the term apple in connection with the sale of apples. Or ... well, you get the picture.""
Link to Original Source
The Courts

SPAM: Judge On CIA Video Tapes: "It Boggles The Mind" 5

Journal by Jeremiah Cornelius

The Federal Judge who ordered the CIA to maintain all evidence related to investigations of "harsh interrogations" committed by the Agency, voiced his skepticism about the destruction of videotapes, during a hearing over a freedom of information request involving the tapes. "I'm asked to believe that actual motion pictures, videotapes, of the relationship between interrogators and priso

Education

+ - Student's Expulsion Over Facebook Photo Reversed 1

Submitted by mykevelli
mykevelli (1222406) writes "Following up Friday's article about a student being expelled for writing a 'threatening' photo description on Facebook, it seems once the pressure of a lawsuit backed by FIRE (Foundation for Individual Rights in Education) came against the Board of Regents, they have backed down. Barnes claims that proper disciplinary processes were not followed for his expulsion and is also asking reimbursement for expenses associated with moving to another university and enrolling there for one semester. Yesterday, the Board of Regents reversed the expulsion of Hayden Barnes. It is unknown at this time whether or not Barnes plans to re-enroll and continue at VSU."
Security

+ - Computerized Lip Reading-> 1

Submitted by
Iddo Genuth
Iddo Genuth writes "Researchers at the University of East Anglia (UEA) in the UK are developing a computerized lip-reading system, which they say may be used to fight crime. Lip-reading is a notoriously difficult skill to master — human lip reading is often unreliable, even when it's performed by trained lip readers. The British scientists expect to complete developing a prototype of a lip reading software within the next two years with the ultimate goal of automatically converting lip-motion videos into text."
Link to Original Source
Power

California Utilities to Control Thermostats? 503

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the bet-those-will-never-get-tampered-with dept.
TeraBill writes "It seems that the California Energy Commission is looking to give utilities in the state the power to control the thermostats in private homes via a radio signal. The idea is that during times of significant energy crunch, the utilities could force thermostats to higher temperatures rather than having to implement a rolling blackout. The thermostats have been around for a while and new ones were on display at the CES show in Vegas this week. While I can see the argument for it, we just had a kid take over a tram system with a remote control, so how long before our thermostat gets hacked by the neighbors. And I'd almost rather have the power drop than have someone significantly raise the temperature in my home if I had a computer running there. (UPS and a graceful shutdown versus cooking something.)"
Bug

Data Loss Bug In OS X 10.5 Leopard 603

Posted by kdawson
from the first-do-no-harm dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Leopard's Finder has a glaring bug in its directory-moving code, leading to horrendous data loss if a destination volume disappears while a move operation is in progress. This author first came across it when Samba crashed while he was moving a directory from his desktop over to a Samba mount on his FreeBSD server."

10th Annual RoboCup 104

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the i-bet-a-robot-wins dept.
Aryabhata writes "As soccer fever continues the 10th RoboCup also got to a start. 400 teams fight it out in 11 different leagues including onces designed for humanoid to four legged robots. "The organizers of the tournament hope that in 2050 the winners of the RoboCup will be able to beat the human World Cup champions".
Beyond the novelty value, the cup enables 2,500 experts in artificial intelligence and robot engineering to meet and test their latest ideas. The championships is followed by a 2 day conference where the teams can dissect their play and work."

Critical Security Hole Found in Diebold Machines 306

Posted by Zonk
from the want-my-money-back dept.
ckswift writes "From security expert Bruce Schneier's blog, a major security hole has been found in Diebold voting machines." From the article: "The hole is considered more worrisome than most security problems discovered on modern voting machines, such as weak encryption, easily pickable locks and use of the same, weak password nationwide. Armed with a little basic knowledge of Diebold voting systems and a standard component available at any computer store, someone with a minute or two of access to a Diebold touch screen could load virtually any software into the machine and disable it, redistribute votes or alter its performance in myriad ways."

Memory Manufacturers Could be Cheating 223

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the please-don't-look-at-the-man-behind-the-curtain dept.
Mark Brown writes "Tom's Hardware is live-testing DDR2 memory products in order to determine whether memory manufacturers submit cherry-picked products for reviews. 'GeIL DDR2-667 that was claimed to be purchased performed worse than the review samples they got: 471 MHz for the review samples vs. 421 MHz for the retail memory.'"

Sandals and Ponytails Behind Slow Linux Adoption 948

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the shave-and-a-haircut dept.
Eric Giguere writes "CNet is reporting that according to former Massachusetts CIO Peter Quinn 'the lax dress code of the open-source community is one of the reasons behind the software's slow uptake in commercial environments.' In particular, Quinn blames the 'sandal and ponytail set' for sluggish adoption of Linux by businesses and governments." From the article: "Quinn, who faced plenty of scrutiny over his support of the OpenDocument standards-based office document format, said proponents of open source in government faced formidable opposition from vested interests if they went public."

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