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Comment: Re:Educational environment (Score 1) 434

by bbk (#32303400) Attached to: Most Useful OS For High-School Science Education?

FYI, Apple's netboot environment coupled with something like DeployStudio is far easier than trying to get PXE booting set up - it's pretty much plug and play with an OS X server.

While your application availability probably dictates what platforms you can use, don't write off Apple because their deployment strategy is different.

Comment: OS X Server + method of your choice (Score 4, Informative) 460

by bbk (#29498453) Attached to: Large-Scale Mac Deployment?

Apple has a robust remote installation suite with OS X Server, which is darn cheap compared to most other commercial offerings.

10.6 includes a first party version of NetRestore (full system image deployment, similar to Ghost or Flash Archive on Solaris), but most people deploying across a large number of systems should roll their own images with packaged based tools like DeployStudio or InstaDMG:

http://www.deploystudio.com/
http://code.google.com/p/instadmg/

Some other good sites for finding info:
  http://www.afp548.com/
  http://www.macenterprise.org/

Power

Three Mile Island Memories 309

Posted by Soulskill
from the if-it-ain't-broke,-send-it-through-congress dept.
theodp writes "Thirty years after the partial nuclear core meltdown at Three Mile Island, Robert Cringely describes the terrible TMI user interface, blaming a confluence of bad design decisions — some made by Congress — for making the accident vastly worse. While computers could be used to monitor the reactor, US law prohibited using computers to directly control nuclear power plants — men would do that. So, when the (one) computer noticed a problem, it would set off audible and visual alarms, and send a problem description to a line printer. Simple, except the computer noticed 700 things wrong in the first few minutes of the TMI accident, causing the one audible alarm to ring continuously until it was shut off as useless. The one visual alarm blinked for days, indicating nothing useful. And the print queue was quickly flooded with 700 error reports followed by thousands of updates and corrections, making it almost instantly hours behind. The operators had to guess at what the problem was."

Google's Amazing Browser Experiments 234

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the yeah-its-that-kind-of-day dept.
Barence writes "On the day that Microsoft launches Internet Explorer 8, Google has unveiled a new site that showcases the Javascript performance of its Chrome browser. Called Chrome Experiments, the site includes 19 extraordinary animated games and widgets that push the browser to its limits. One experiment, called Browser Ball allows you to 'throw' a bouncing ball from one browser window to the next. Google Gravity, on the other hand, collapses the normal Google homepage into a pile at the bottom of the screen. However, you can still enter search terms into the box and watch the results drop from the top of the browser window."
Math

March 14th Officially Becomes National Pi Day 321

Posted by Soulskill
from the pi-in-the-sky-legislation dept.
whitefox writes "The scoop from CNet is that 'The US House of Representatives on Wednesday approved a resolution introduced two days earlier that designates March 14, 2009 (3/14, get it?) as National Pi Day. It urges schools to take the opportunity to teach their students about Pi and "engage them about the study of mathematics."' The resolution is available online. I doubt it'll ever become a national holiday, but the Pi string in the article is pretty cool in a nerdy sort of way."

"I got everybody to pay up front...then I blew up their planet." "Now why didn't I think of that?" -- Post Bros. Comics

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