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Comment: Re:Go North, Young Man (Score 0) 198

by bastion_xx (#43765679) Attached to: Data Center Managers Weary of Whittling Cooling Costs

MIA to SEF is around 50ms on a good day. MPLS providers will set their SLA around that value, so it's a pretty good bet the Internet as a whole will have some induces latency. Don't forget all the regeneration of signal and hops along that airmles route.

Ask the high frequency traders, ad providers, or other brokers how important latency is and you'll get a different story. There's a good reason people colocate at 111 8th or other downtown locations in Manhattan then across the river in Secaucus NJ. Data centers are always going to be a) close to the companies that house CPE there; b) close to others they wish to communicate with (NYSE, NASDAQ, CME) and then close to the carrier hotels (1 Wilsire, 56 Marietta, etc), and backed up by SLA driven networks, not just Network Service Provider connections.

PUE is more achievable in homogeneous DC's that Google, Facebook or Apple run. It's harder to get a PUE under 1.8 when in a heterogeneous data centers. It's hard to convey to customers that their per-kWH cost isn't just a markup on the utility power, but everything else that goes along with cooling, maintainability, and DC operations.

Comment: Re:Try it, you'll like it (Score 1) 398

by bastion_xx (#42577397) Attached to: Touchscreen Laptops, Whether You Like Them Or Not

I was looking for your comment before adding it myself. Totally agree that for desktops and laptops, DO.. NOT... TOUCH... MY... SCREEN... I've had other engineers poking the hell out of a Visio diagram on the screen and sales execs tapping various Powerpoint slides. Initially I'll make a comment such as "it's not a touch screen" or "do you happen to have a microfiber cloth?". Now if I see anyone starting to move toward the screen I'll place my hand between theirs and nicely ask them not to touch the screen.

Ironically, on my smartphone or iPad, fingerprints, smudges and such don't bug me at all. You can leave a salsa and chocolate trail and it's no big deal.

So I think if the laptop was used for standard productivity, no touchy my screeny. I'd like to try a hybrid for a bit (Windows 8) and see if that changes my mind.

Comment: Re:Should've learned the lessons (Score 1) 162

by bastion_xx (#41852427) Attached to: NYC Data Center Needs Focus On Fuel

And colo providers get driven down on cost as customers forget the previous catastrophic event. Every dollar spent enhancing a data center is passed along to the customer in some fashion. When your per-cab or per-foot pricing is higher than the competition--even if you can demonstrate more resiliency--it is a harder sell.

You can talk flood plains, gen sets, fuel locations and delivery schedules, CRAH and chiller redundancy, etc. As long as the SSAE16 or SOC 2 is current and there are no lingering memories of an "event" at the facility, it's going to come down to price. It's hard to help customers understand the basic capabilities of colo, let alone pricing differences. It mostly seems to come down to perception of the facility -- and price.

I would propose customers that have stringent RPO/RTO's investigate true geographic diversity. Not just for separation of footprints, but also to be disaster-diverse. Hurricane, tornado, power brown outs, earthquakes, etc.

Comment: Re:Data centers look archaic to me now (Score 1) 21

by bastion_xx (#41776141) Attached to: Open Compute Hardware Adapted For Colo Centers

What's remarkable is the PUE factors Google, Facebook and Apple can get in their data centers. I stil think these are due to the homogenous nature of the equipment the place there, and the fact they don't have to worry about the multi-tenancy of commercial data centers. Middle of nowhere locations where things such as venting from the hot aisle are possible. In NYC, the 111 8th Avenue data centers are a good example of the constraints put on the various operators. Hopefully Google can help remediate that.

In regards to power and cooling, I still have a lot to learn about the tradeoffs in ease of use versus PUE. Good thread.

Comment: Regional Winners -- Say What? (Score 1) 168

by bastion_xx (#41520077) Attached to: The Fastest ISPs In the US

The regional stats aren't correct. In looking at the regional winner for Georgia, I see it's Verizon FiOS. That would be news to VzT (Verizon Telecom) since they have zero presence in Georgia (AT&T, formerly BellSouth territory). People in AL, TN, SC and NC would also agree. My guess is that the numbers for Tampa (LEC is VzT) destroyed the performance for the rest of the ISP's checked in the other states.

I would love to see a similar test performed, at a higher level of quality, for ISP providers in data centers.

Comment: Re:verizon (Score 1) 195

by bastion_xx (#40731101) Attached to: If You Lived In Riga, You Wouldn't Bother To Cut the Cord

FiOS (Verizon) or uVerse (AT&T) are wireline products. If you look at wireline growth in the 2-4% year over year versus wireless in 20%+ range, there isn't a big incentive for the telco's to invest in wireline upgrades. Look at FiOS - there are no new markets or expansions that Verizon wishes to do. Why? Because the capital invested in a wireline plant doesn't have nearly the same return on capital invested that upgrading a market to LTE does.

Granted wireless is saturated on the voice call component, but data is still a growing market. Ever wonder why the new share plans give you unlimited minutes and SMS? That's a gimmie compared to the hope you'll consume data (and pay for it).

The new cabal is the broadband providers such as Comcast/Charter/Cox looking to enhance and augment the Ethernet data markets while the telcos focus on wireless. Hence the recent purchase by Verizon for frequencies while promoting the cable consortium. I still think you'll see any carrier with wireless sell off their wireline business as focus on "mobility".

Comment: Re:TFA doesn't say how much FB invested (Score 1) 94

Most of the newer submarine cable systems have large amounts of participants in the consortium. It's not uncommon for Verizon, AT&T, Sprint, Global Crossing, Tata, BT, and others to be involved in these systems. My guess is that FB wants more control over the capacity of the system or to ensure capacity ends up where they need it, say China. Interesting landing points for China too.

This is strange though. You'd think FB would rather invest in the data centers near big pipes instead investing in transit itself. Maybe they just want to circuits installed in a more timely manner--I'm looking at you Big Red.

+ - How do I convince them Virtual is NOT best?

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "I work as 3rd line support for an application vendor, from time to time we get some really out-there issues reported by our customers. Usually it's data, or user error, but from time to time its a performance issue with our 'legacy' code.

Our internal IT dept are racing to do an entire VMware infrastructure. I realise the benefits from a 'Production' point of view, but I don't need all those benefits. I NEED to replicate the deployment of our software in the same environment many of our customers still run it. On 'old' physical kit.

The IT team claim they can dial down the VM server to behave the same as a physical host would, but our first pass of testing showed faster performance on the VM (by several orders of magnitute!). But they claim they can dial it down even further...To match the results of our physical server.

I say thats 'not fair' as the architecture between a current generation server hosting a VM is so vastly different to a 5 year old phyiscal host that it becomes a nonsense.

They wont hear it.. What's the killer arguement that I can use to convince them?"
NASA

+ - Interview: Why Hubble broke and how it was fixed->

Submitted by
angry tapir
angry tapir writes "I recently had the opportunity to sit down Charles (Charlie) Pellerin, who was NASA's director of astrophysics when the Hubble Space Telescope launched with its seemingly fatally flawed optical system. Pellerin went on to head up the servicing mission that finally fixed the telescope and for that was awarded NASA's highest honour, a Distinguished Service Medal. Since Hubble he has done a lot of thinking about the problems that led up to the error and how organisations can best avoid making similar mistakes."
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Don't send it (Score 1) 570

by bastion_xx (#38412230) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Most Efficient, Worthwhile Charity?
Economically it may be more efficient to donate money, but the personal effort and involvement goes a long way. And, you can do both. A local food pantry we assist has seen a 600% increase since late 2008. Besides time and personal donations bought at Wal-Mart or Target, the donations are used by the pantry to buy in bulk things such as masa harina, sugar and such, and then packaged for individual families. Tis the season to be giving....

Comment: Re:Check out religious charities (Score 1) 570

by bastion_xx (#38412200) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Most Efficient, Worthwhile Charity?
They seem to help too (World Vision that is). In Haiti, besides UN and Catholic Relief Services (CRS) vehicles, World Vision is predominant, even in the Central Plateau. Doing the research on local, regional and global agencies goes a long way. Even if you focus on one particular area (Haiti, local homeless, your neighbors, etc.), giving a small portion to other groups is helpful.

Everything that can be invented has been invented. -- Charles Duell, Director of U.S. Patent Office, 1899

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