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Submission + - Google's Bosworth: Why AJAX Failed, Then Succeeded

An anonymous reader writes: eWEEK has a story on a talk from former-Microsoft developer Adam Bosworth (now VP for Google) entitled "Physics, Speed and Psychology: What Works and What Doesn't in Software, and Why." Bosworth depicts issues with processing, broadband, natural language, human behavior, and dishes on Microsoft. From the article:
"'Back in '96-'97, me and a group of people... helped build stuff that these days is called AJAX,' Bosworth said. 'We sat down and took a hard look at what was going to happen with the Internet and we concluded, in the face of unyielding opposition and animosity from virtually every senior person at Microsoft, that the thick client was on its way out and it was going to be replaced by browser-based apps. Saying this at Microsoft back in '96 was roughly equivalent to wandering around in a fire wearing matches,' he said. 'But we concluded we should go and build this thing. And we put all this stuff together so people could build thin-client applications.'...
Drawing on the lessons he learned from the initial failure of AJAX, Bosworth admonished developers to think about user activity. 'Ask what the frequency is,' he said. 'Unless an app is used over and over each day, make it simple, even if more clicks [or] pages are required.' Also, 'Ask how long it takes to execute a requested task,' he said. 'If it takes more than 2 seconds, consider not providing the task or splitting it up into small, user-controlled tasks.' Moreover, 'sites where people don't go a lot don't need AJAX-style UIs [user interfaces],' Bosworth said. 'If we started building AJAX for AJAX's sake we wouldn't be doing our customers any favors.'"

Submission + - Getting a grip on Google code

netbuzz writes: "Niall Kennedy reports on his blog that Guido van Rossum, author of the Python programming language, has begun showing off his first project since joining Google last year.

"Mondrian is a Web-based code-review system built on top of a Perforce and BigTable backend with a Python-powered front-end," Kennedy writes. "Mondrian is a pretty impressive system and is currently in use across Google."

Kennedy's description of Google's current code-review system sure makes it sound like it was in need of an upgrade.

"The Mondrian tool creates a much better workflow by creating task-specific dashboards, in-line commenting, well-tracked statistics, and more," he writes. "The application is built on top of Python open source libraries such as the Django framework, mail service, and the wsgiref Web server software." google-mondrian.html"

Submission + - Fiorina Gets the Last Laugh

4foot10 writes: "For all the turmoil roiling Hewlett-Packard's Palo Alto campus of late, the third quarter has become a cause for celebration as the PC maker edged out rival Dell for the top spot in worldwide PC shipments, according to market-share analyst firm iSuppli and reported by And the feat was likely more satisfying to someone who no longer works there."

Numeric stability is probably not all that important when you're guessing.