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Submission + - PS3 Owner Refunded for Missing OtherOS (

Toxicgonzo writes: Amazon has given a PS3 owner a 20% refund for removal of the PS3's OtherOS feature. The owner cited European law Directive 1999/44/EC — which states that goods must:
        * comply with the description given by the seller and posses the same qualities and characteristics as other similar goods
        * be fit for the purpose which the consumer requires them and which was made known to the seller at the time of purchase

How many other European PS3 owners will follow suit? If Amazon foots the bill to Sony, how will Sony respond?

Submission + - Inkjet-like device prints cells on burns (

TigerWolf2 writes: Inspired by a standard office inkjet printer, U.S. researchers have rigged up a device that can spray skin cells directly onto burn victims, quickly protecting and healing their wounds as an alternative to skin grafts.

Tests on mice showed the spray system, called bioprinting, could heal wounds quickly and safely, the researchers reported at the Translational Regenerative Medicine Forumb.


Submission + - Former Astronaut Dr. Ed Mitchel claims ET's exist. ( 1

numbski writes: "As improbable and difficult to believe, Dr. Edgar Mitchell, the 6th man to walk on the moon, and holds the record for the longest moon walk has gone the UK radio show Kerrang and stated publically that aliens do exist, and that several contacts have been made. A former member of MOD, Nick Pope corroborates the story. Dr. Mitchell even states during the interview, without question, that this is not a hoax. Difficult to believe, and based on the contents of his Wikipedia Entry, it seems that he has gone from 90% certainty to complete certainty, and that he claims to have previously been cured of cancer by a distance healer. I could not help but think that this was at least worthy of discussion, as this isn't a redneck in a corn field. This is a man with a doctorate from MIT."

Submission + - Why Email Should Not Be Used For Collaboration (

Surinder Kahai writes: "Email tends to be misused because of its accessibility and convenience. People end up using it in situations where alternatives would be more suitable. While email can be great for communication, it is not a good tool for collaboration. Going forward, research shows that emergent collaboration is going to be a significant way for organizations to communicate. Emergent collaboration is organic and takes place naturally — we see this type of collaboration in MMORPGs like World of Warcraft. Another example would be the story about the emergence of collaboration among individuals after a systems administrator at a university discovered a hacker attack on his university's server and traced it to rsync, a synchronization tool for Unix/Linux machines. A resolution was reached very quickly without any rules or protocols in place. Requirements for emergent collaboration are important as they will provide software developers with certain standards that they can use to create tools to harness the power of emergent collaboration."
Operating Systems

Submission + - Ext2 On Microsofts Singularity OS (

mortalic writes: "Abstract: Singularity is a new operating system produced by Microsoft Research. The design of Singularity is a marked departure from current commodity operating systems such as Windows or Linux. This paper presents and implementation of the Linux ext2 file system for use on Singularity. This project allows the design of Singularity to be evaluated. The development and testing described in this paper show that the Singularity design goals of high dependability and good enough performance are largely met. The protection provided by the micro kernel design prevented the Singularity kernel from crashing in the face of errors in the ext2 code. Performance testing showed that while not as fast as ext2 on Linux performance is not prohibitively low and the overhead of garbage collection is minimal. — Then there is my personal favorite line in the paper: Performance is a secondary goal only to the extent that it must be good enough to make the system practically usable. Despite the de-emphasis of performance, Microsoft has published micro-benchmarks showing that the Singularity design results in improved performance of many basic operating system operations such as a kernel API call, thread yield or starting a process."
The Courts

Submission + - BitTorrent Users Seek Compensation from Comcast

An anonymous reader writes: TorrentFreak reports that Comcast is facing a nationwide class action lawsuit (doc) for cutting off the BitTorrent traffic of their subscribers. The lawsuit, initiated by network expert Robb Topolski, aims to stop the misleading advertising used by Comcast, and to compensate BitTorrent users for the disruption to their service.
Linux Business

Submission + - Ubuntu hyper-active at OSCON (

ruphus13 writes: Ubuntu and Canonical have been very active at OSCON this year. They showcased a new distro. From the article, "Ubuntu Netbook Remix, a complete distribution designed to run on Atom-based Netbook PCs. The main difference that sets it apart from it's big brother Hardy Heron is the Ubuntu Mobile Edition (UME) Launcher, a user interface created specifically for use on the teensy screens and keyboards of today's popular ultra-portable computers." Canonical, the company behind Ubuntu, also announced Version 2.0 of Launchpad, their code-hosting platform. Enhancements include "a planned API that'll allow third-party applications to authenticate, query and modify data in the massive Launchpad database, without a user needing to manually access the system via a browser". Mark Shuttleworth went on to state that Linux market share will grow when it has better eye-candy than Apple, so we can expect slicker UIs for Desktop Linux!
Data Storage

Submission + - Sun, IBM both launched "the first" 1TB tap

Aditi.Tuteja writes: "Both SUN and IBM have claimed to have developed "the first one terabyte storage tape drive," Sun last monday released the new StorageTek T10000B Fibre Channel tape drive and IBM on Tuesday itself followed up by claiming to release the "world's first" 1TB tape drive with the System Storage TS1130. But who really did it first? Both of their tape drives have similar features and price ranges."

Submission + - Aspect Oriented Programming (

justaguy516 writes: "Recently, I was asked to attend a session on aspect oriented programming, which is being rolled out in our organization. I was pretty aghast; we are creating a way to bypass the (imho) the only useful feature of OO. In my mind it is a complete recipe for disaster. We are a software services organization (focussing on the communications domain) and mostly C/C++/embedded in nature, and reliability is a very important aspect; 99.99% availability is a standard requirement. Anybody has any stories/experience to share in this?"

Submission + - NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander Continues Tests with Ra (

Rob writes: "TUCSON, Ariz. — The team operating NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander plans to tell the lander today to do a second, larger test of using a motorized rasp to produce and gather shavings of frozen ground. The planned test is a preparation for putting a similar sample into one of Phoenix's laboratory ovens in coming days. The instrument with the oven, the Thermal and Evolved- Gas Analyzer (TEGA), will be used to check whether the hard layer exposed in a shallow trench is indeed rich in water ice, as scientists expect, and to identify some other ingredients in the frozen soil."

Submission + - How to encourage a young teen to learn programming 2

Anonymous Hacker writes: I'm in a bit of a bind. My young teenage son is starting to get curious about computers, and in particular, programming. Now, I'm a long time kernel hacker, (Linux, BSD and UNIX). I have no trouble handling some of the more obscure things in the kernel. But teaching is not something that I'm good at, by any means. Heck, I can't even write useful documentation for non-techies.

So my question is: what's the best way to encourage his curiousity and enable him to learn?

Now I know there are folks out there with far better experience in this area than myself. And I'd really appreciate any wisdom you can offer. I'd also be especially interested in what younger people think, in particular those who are in College, or High School, now.

I've shown my son some of the basics of the shell, the filesystem, and even how to do a "Hello World" program in C. Yet I have to wonder if this is the really the right approach? This was great when I was first learning things. And it still is for kernel hacking, and other things. Yet I'm concerned whether this will bore him, now that there's so much more available, and where much of this world is oriented towards a point-n-click.

So, what do you think? What's the best way to for a young teen to get started in exploring this wonderful world of computers and learning how to program? In a *NIX environment only, please. I don't, and won't, run Windows.

Submission + - How to get an International Rate?

Eddie Ayling writes: "I'm a senior software engineer. I happen to live in a 3rd world country that is about to go down like the Titanic. For someone that has not had the privilege of living through this experience, this is not the equivalent of a recession in a civilized country. Here is a link with background information if anyone is interested. Last time this happened I was able to get an H1B Visa after working without pay for three months and proving I was worth the hassle. I'm sorry to say I can't do that again as this time around I have a family to maintain. Has anyone in my situation secured a job with an "international" rate/wage, either working at a distance or under contract? I have found a few obstacles along the way. I general employers tend to think that 20 bucks an hour is a fortune in my country. This is clearly not the case. I'll be grateful for any ideas, information or experiences you might be able to provide."

Submission + - Network card crashes Dublin air traffic control (

schliz writes: A faulty network card shut down Dublin airport after air traffic control (ATC) was unable to track the location of incoming planes. The airport was shut on Wednesday after ATC periodically lost plane tracking for up to ten minutes at a time. Flights had to be rerouted across Europe, causing massive delays.

Numeric stability is probably not all that important when you're guessing.