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Comment: Further context needed here. (Score 0) 606

by awjr (#41583613) Attached to: UK Man Arrested For Offensive Joke Posted On Facebook

It appears he didn't post it to his status, but found the support group on Facebook set up to help those people affected by her murder and posted it there to antagonize them.

So it's not so much that he posted the joke (which has been on sickipedia for at least 3-4 days), but that he went out of his way to upset a load of people deliberately.

Comment: Here's my fix (Score 4, Interesting) 102

by awjr (#41198621) Attached to: BBC Keeps Android Flash Alive In the UK

It's a pain but you can get around it. You need to use the xscope browser and the flash apk. Works a treat on BBC and Channel 4 OD . Video I made about how to do it on a Nexus here. Should work with other 4.1 devices.

Personally this really sucks. The internet is playing catch-up to a forced move away from a technology. It's not that the device cannot run flash, just made it slightly annoying. Google's decision not to put it into Chrome is annoying at most :(

Comment: /. could try harder... (Score 3, Informative) 169

by awjr (#40589667) Attached to: Samsung Blames Galaxy SIII Burn On "External Energy Source"

You really really need to investigate further before posting these stories. Samsung didn't "blame" it on external sources which implies "it wasn't really us, honest, seriously". The guy that posted the initial fire report had a friend 'drop' the phone into water then attempt to dry it out using a microwave.

"Galaxy SIII burn caused by microwaving wet phone" is what it should be.

Comment: Patents for different sectors (Score 1) 372

by awjr (#40563253) Attached to: Apple-Motorola Judge Questions Need For Software Patents

If you RTFA, you'll realise this is not just about software patents. He's going so far as to suggest that patents are suitable for certain industries (e.g. Pharmaceuticals) where the investment to create the products is immense. Software is one of those industries where patents hold back innovation. Software is more about execution.

Comment: Corporate greed drives your laws in America (Score 5, Interesting) 515

by awjr (#40085023) Attached to: FCC Boss Backs Metering the Internet

You have a very weird system over there. In the UK, one company, BT had a monopoly on the telephone system. This was recognised and legislation was put in place that the last 'mile' of the connection could be used by any company offering services many years ago allowing me to choose from multiple ISPs as long as there was space in the junction box for the hardware. Now there is concern that BT again may be able to monopolise the next 'evolution' as we move towards fibre to house, so there are calls to prevent this from happening.

In the US there seems to be a focus on the government doing what is good for corporate greed and not what is good for society. :(

Comment: Re:Honestly I think you might have this all wrong. (Score 1) 582

by awjr (#39171991) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Dealing With University Firewalls?

I do find that the idea that giving unlimited internet access to a bunch of hormonally challenged students to be a one-way ticket to malware hell. It would be remiss of the IT department not to operate a white listing approach to their internet with a process in place for having a site added to the list.

Comment: Honestly I think you might have this all wrong.... (Score 3, Informative) 582

by awjr (#39170417) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Dealing With University Firewalls?

If you can go to your course lecturers and justify why you need access to Hackaday to complete your course, I am sure your lecturers have a process to unblock the sites.

In the meantime there are 1000s of other students trying to use campus PCs without needing to find them screwed over by the previous user. What you *might* be able to persuade the University to do is to provide an unrestricted wi-fi point on campus for personal use.

Comment: Re:But everybody does it! (Score 1) 744

by awjr (#38865137) Attached to: Some Critics Suggest Apple Boycott Over Chinese Working Conditions

Please please please listen to the American life pod cast on this. Foxconn *know* when Apple are about to make inspections. In fact there are companies in China specifically in the business of getting companies through these inspections.

The point is more, that Apple is making an obscene amount of money ($400k per employee) and can do so much more to improve the life of Apple "manufacturing force".

Comment: But everybody does it! (Score 1) 744

by awjr (#38864531) Attached to: Some Critics Suggest Apple Boycott Over Chinese Working Conditions

To quote:
"Apple is not alone among electronic companies employing Foxconn and other such plants."

However, Apple (and to a lesser extent other electronic companies) can insist on certain standards. I believe that Apple looks at the cost model (wages, part costs etc) and then dictates how much profit companies like Foxconn can make per assembly. If Apple insisted on a certain standard of welfare and provided money into their costing specifically for this ( I believe HP do this), then this issue would go away.

What has surprised me is that Apple have not set up their own manufacturing bases in China/Brazil. Then it dawned on me. If Apple partner with Foxconn et al, then they are able to blame their partners, even though Apple are intrinsically involved in dictating precisely what these partners are allowed to charge Apple for producing their products.

Comment: US needs to look East (Score 1) 433

by awjr (#38806171) Attached to: AT&T Caps Netflix Streaming Costs At $68K/Yr

In the UK, one company is offering a tariff plan with unlimited data (including tethering) for about $40 per month. They have been cleaning up. (In my case I think I've hit 5GB download today, but I am running a number of software updates.)

Another company is offering an unlimited data plan for about $15, but you are not allowed to tether (which I find key).

Seriously you need to get some decent competition over there.

Comment: Cross-Platform 'Native' Development can work (Score 1) 197

by awjr (#38759010) Attached to: The Headaches of Cross-Platform Mobile Development

I'm not particularly interested in native development, maybe I should be, but I've looked at a number of technologies, initially Flex with deploy via Air, then Phonegap and finally settling on Appcelerator.

Particularly for slower Android phones, Phonegap HTML5 apps really suck with many reviews having the classic "really like the app, but it was just too slow to be use-able". This is a killer and this issue will go away in the first world, but will never go away in the developing markets, just look at Aakash.

So at the moment, if you are careful with your component solution, Appcelerator offers (IMHO) the 'best' cross-platform native compile solution (it even has a webKit plugin so you can deliver HTML5 apps) for iOS/Android. Blackberry is in beta and I have no idea when WP7 will be supported.

One downside....you need to buy a Mac.

Comment: Had an interview with puzzles (Score 1) 672

by awjr (#38610106) Attached to: Are Brain Teasers Good Hiring Criteria?

They knew I didn't have the precise skill set they were looking for and I was brutally honest about it in the interview.

However the puzzles were fun, or I thought so, but I did my thinking aloud. I realised they probably wanted to know how I 'thought'.

One puzzle was; you had 9 balls, one lighter than the others, a set of balance scales. Using two measurements find the lightest ball.

I got offered the job. I did have to keep a lot of thoughts to myself though ;)

+ - Ask Slashdot: Which mobile app platform agnostic s

Submitted by awjr
awjr (1248008) writes "It's a choice I have been considering for some time, and I think it has come down to either Appcelerator or Phonegap. There are advantages in both but mostly I feel I am sacrificing performance over re-usability (as well as cost as Appcelerator realistically can only be developed on a Mac). I'm also not sure if I am being too narrow in my list of candidates. Your thoughts would be greatly appreciated!"

Comment: Working from home makes you smelly (Score 2) 275

by awjr (#38205340) Attached to: Does Telecommuting Make You Invisible?

Routine hygiene goes completely out the door as does the need to wear clothes.

True Story: Office cabin in the garden; hot summers day; house on the market. Sitting naked working away, the real estate agent turns up with a bunch of people looking to buy the house. After that I always kept an emergency pair of shorts in the cabin. :)

"Irrationality is the square root of all evil" -- Douglas Hofstadter

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