Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Iphone

Adobe Stops Development For iPhone 497

Posted by timothy
from the flash-in-the-pad dept.
adeelarshad82 writes "Adobe's principal product manager Mike Chambers announced that Adobe is no longer investing in iPhone-based Flash development. The move comes after Apple put out a new draft of its iPhone developer program license, which banned private APIs and required apps to be written in Objective-C, C, C++, or JavaScript as executed by the iPhone OS WebKit engine. According to Chambers, Adobe will still provide the ability to target the iPhone and iPad in Flash CS5, but the company is not currently planning any additional investments in that feature." Daring Fireball points out approvingly Apple's rebuttal to the claim that Flash is an open format, however convenient it might be for iPad owners. Related: The new app policy seems to be inconsistently enforced. Reader wilsonthecat writes "Novell have released a new press release in response to Apple's announcement that none-C/C++/Objective-C based iPhone application development breaks their SDK terms. The press release names several apps that have made it past app review process since the new Apple SDK agreement."

Comment: RequestPolicy (Score 1) 223

by avicarmi (#31361864) Attached to: Window Pain

http://www.requestpolicy.com/

RequestPolicy is an extension for Mozilla browsers that improves the privacy and security of your browsing by giving you control over when cross-site requests are allowed by webpages you visit. It is the first comprehensive client-side protection against CSRF attacks and the first tool to enable the use of modern browsers without cross-site information leakage.

not just displays, as the original post was suggesting, but also allows to you block (or unblock) cross site requests.

Comment: Re:Underclocking (Score 1) 697

by avicarmi (#29868833) Attached to: Low-Power Home Linux Server?

latest Mac Mini Server ($999 with the server software, 2.53GHz, Core 2 Duo, 4GB RAM, 1TB disk, but no optical) draws 14W at idle according to apple it even lower processor's speed between keystrokes...

http://www.apple.com/macmini/environment.html

Efficient power supply.

Mac mini includes a highly efficient power supply that reduces the amount of power wasted when bringing electricity from the wall to your computer. Lower power consumption reduces energy bills and lessens the environmental impact of greenhouse gas emissions from power plants.
Advanced power management.

Unlike a lot of Windows-based PC systems, Mac mini uses energy-efficient hardware components that work hand in hand with the operating system to conserve power. Mac OS X spins down hard drives and activates sleep mode. And it balances tasks across both central processors and graphics processors. Mac OS X never misses a power-saving opportunity, no matter how small. It even regulates the processor between keystrokes, reducing power between the letters you type. That’s just one of many ways Apple manages small amounts of power that add up to big savings.

Mac mini is a great example of Apple’s energy-efficient design philosophy. It uses less than 14 watts of power when idle — that’s something no other desktop computer can do.

The Courts

Swedish ISP Deletes Customer ID Info 177

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the putting-tread-on-the-slippery-slope dept.
NewYorkCountryLawyer writes "A Swedish internet service provider, Bahnhof, has begun deleting customer identification information in order to prevent it from being used as evidence against its customers under Sweden's new legislation against copyright infringement via peer-to-peer file sharing. According to this report on 'The Local,' it is entirely legal for it to do so. The company's CEO, Jon Karlung, is identified as 'a vociferous opponent of the measures that came into force on April 1st,' and is quoted saying that he is determined to protect the company's clients, and that 'It's about the freedom to choose, and the law makes it possible to retain details. We're not acting in breach of IPRED; we're following the law and choosing to destroy the details.'"
Wireless Networking

+ - Should I send my kids to school with tinfoil hats? 2

Submitted by
concerned parent
concerned parent writes "The kids school installed wireless network in all classrooms, and they are very proud of it.

I could not find any conclusive research on the net, and trying to contact the school to ask them if they did any research on the effects of wifi on young brains went unanswered.

I might be a bit paranoid, but my daughter was diagnosed with leukemia two years ago (she is doing very well, and is going back to school), so just to be on the safe side, should I line my kids hats with tinfoil?"

Are we running light with overbyte?

Working...