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Comment: Re:Did author read any details of the App store? (Score 4, Informative) 580

by aukset (#33991704) Attached to: Beware the Garden of Steven

What you might have missed or are ignoring is that apt allows you to specify the location of ANY and MULTIPLE repositories, so its possible for an individual developer to host their own repository for their own stuff that users can acquire and update their software from, without having to touch the official central repositories.

Comment: Re:Yes, but is it dishwasher safe? (Score 1) 174

by aukset (#33920926) Attached to: Tablets Are Game-Changers For Special Needs Kids

Unfortunately for these families, the industry knows exactly who their customers are. Even if they are not targeting the medical device market (huge payouts from insurance companies), they are well aware that people who love their children will come up with the cash somehow. The price point is just about right: same a family with "normal" kids might spend on a console and a couple games and entertainment system to babysit for them.

Iphone

Consumer Reports Can't Recommend iPhone 4 507

Posted by kdawson
from the waiting-for-four-dot-one dept.
jbezorg was one among many readers to send word that Consumer Reports has concluded that they cannot recommend the iPhone 4. (They still enthusiastically recommend the 3G S.) "It's official. Consumer Reports' engineers have just completed testing the iPhone 4, and have confirmed that there is a problem with its reception. When your finger or hand touches a spot on the phone's lower left side — an easy thing, especially for lefties — the signal can significantly degrade enough to cause you to lose your connection altogether if you're in an area with a weak signal. Due to this problem, we can't recommend the iPhone 4. ... Our findings call into question the recent claim by Apple that the iPhone 4's signal-strength issues were largely an optical illusion caused by faulty software that 'mistakenly displays 2 more bars than it should for a given signal strength.'" The comments on the article don't display any of the vitriol the Apple faithful have been known to unleash upon anyone daring to question the Cupertino way. Perhaps they are moderated.
Idle

Growing A House From Meat 133

Posted by samzenpus
from the delicious-future dept.
baosol writes "From the boundary-pushing team of archi-visionaries who brought us the fabulous Fab Tree Hab comes a new (and somewhat disgusting) way to grow a structure — using animal flesh! The In Vitro Meat Habitat is a futuristic concept home composed of meat cells grown in a lab. The creator of the concept, Mitchell Joachim, is a futurist with a twist– he says he is actually developing the concept in a lab."

Comment: Re:I reject the notion that man isn't a cosmic ent (Score 1) 91

by aukset (#32140178) Attached to: New Evidence Presented For Ancient Fossils In Mars Rocks

..and I reject the notion that my urinating on your doorstep is in any way unnatural.

Its called having respect for something that isn't yours. Get some, and stop whining that other people might actually hold you accountable for the consequences of your actions, since you are apparently too selfish or short-sighted to consider them on your own.

Comment: Scanning, Defensive driving and CEVO (Score 3, Insightful) 166

by aukset (#31962574) Attached to: EyeDriver Lets Drivers Steer Car With Their Eyes

Advanced driving courses always teach scanning techniques for driving that include looking not only where you are going, but constantly scanning for pedestrians on either side of the road, cars that may or may not see you about to turn in front of you, cars in your left and right side mirrors, and cars in your rear view mirror. They also teach to always have an escape route: if the unexpected happens, always have a place you can steer to to avoid a hazard without crashing into another car or a pedestrian. You can't do these things if you always have to look only where you want the car to go. Peripheral vision is not acute enough to pick up, for example, the shadow of a person's feet beneath a huge SUV parked on the side of a road, where that person may suddenly step out in front of you without looking since the SUV is blocking both your and their line of sight. Unless entirely autonomous, the vehicle's control surfaces HAVE to be independent of eye movement, because situational awareness depends on it (even in some cases the ability to turn your head to check a blind spot, or to see if your kid in the back seat isn't choking on his or her toys).

Comment: Re:Really annoying (Score 1) 984

by aukset (#31641472) Attached to: Ubuntu Will Switch To Base-10 File Size Units In Future Release

Re-read his post. He didn't say he can't change, he said (and you quoted) he does not WANT to change. Now I suggest you get off his lawn before he comes after you with his cane yelling things about punch card dimensions being measured in base 10 so everything else should be.

Its an entirely emotional reaction that old people seem to have a lot in regards to change.

Bye bye karma...

Comment: Re:Something doesn't add up here. (Score 1) 69

by aukset (#31576616) Attached to: RNA-Loaded Nanoparticles Fight Cancer

There are two parts to this:

1) Get the RNA into the cell in the first place. Anything you want to get into a cell has to pass through the cell membrane, and if the molecule is any larger than H2O, the only way to do that is with a transport mechanism you would find within the cell membrane. In this case, the transferrin receptor that transports Fe from the bloodstream to the interior of the cell.

2) Cause the transcription interference in the DNA itself, as described by the GP. At this point, the transferrin receptor is no longer at issue. While normal cells will definitely uptake the RNA, the idea is that normal cells won't be affected by it because it is designed to interfere only with RRM2, a cancerous mutation.

Comment: Re:More like a flaw in statistics (Score 1) 437

by aukset (#31565750) Attached to: Flaw In Emergency Response System May Have Killed Hundreds

Care to explain how reducing call priority can reduce call volume? Here's a clue: It doesn't, every call gets an ambulance no matter the priority. The only difference is in the TARGET "out of chute time" (how long before the call is dispatched) and TARGET response time (how long until the ambulance arrives on scene).

Comment: Re:Oh, won't you think of the children? (Score 1) 234

by aukset (#31266576) Attached to: Utah Considers Warrantless Internet Subpoenas

If you worked with the police on a day to day basis you would actually find that MOST cops are good, and that even most examples of bad cops are good people making bad decisions. It only takes one rotten fruit to spoil the bunch, and this old adage could not be truer about our collective opinions on law enforcement.

Comment: Re:Causation (Score 1) 210

by aukset (#31215528) Attached to: Math Anxiety Affects Skills As Basic As Counting

You are correct to state that this study does not prove causation, but you have to also take into consideration that this study does not exist in isolation. There is plenty of evidence to support the idea that anxiety about a task leads to a decreased aptitude at performing that task. Causation can be implied, but it can also be the case that there is causation in both directions: feedback that an individual is a poor performer at math reinforces the anxiety, which in turn causes the poor performance, resulting in additional feedback that the individual is a poor performer at math, increasing anxiety further.

Comment: Re:Braking deceleration (Score 1) 311

by aukset (#30875640) Attached to: Skydiver To Break Sound Barrier During Free-Fall

All high altitude jumps involve multiple stages of parachutes that gradually reduce the speed of the fall and provide some stability to the fall to prevent the object (aka human being) from spinning out of control. No doubt the same approach will be taken here. A small chute can be deployed initially to provide a gradual increase in drag as the atmosphere thickens, and once at a low enough altitude, deploy a larger chute to slow the decent to a survivable velocity.

Comment: Re:Before deployment (Score 3, Informative) 471

by aukset (#30866364) Attached to: Electromagnetic Pulse Gun To Help In Police Chases

Its called an ECG or EKG and it involves 3 to 4 stickers placed on the limbs, attached to wires that lead to a monitor, that measure the positive electical potential of the heart as it depolarizes to cause myocardial contraction. Pacemakers have a very distrinct "rhythm" on a heart monitor that is recognizable compared to any other heart rhythm. What it would look like in the case of an EMP disruption of pacemaker activity will depend on the reason for the insertion of the pacemaker.Most likely you would get a junctional or ventricular rhythm (bradycardic QRS with disassociated P waves at 20-60 QRS per minute). Except in the case of extremely fit athletes, a ventricular rate of less than 60 is very bad news for circulatory perfusion.

Machines certainly can solve problems, store information, correlate, and play games -- but not with pleasure. -- Leo Rosten

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