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Comment: Give them the numbers. (Score 3, Insightful) 192

Hi there, in the month of April, this is what we saw:

1. 248,000,000 spam killed at our outer gateway that never made it to employee inboxes.

2. Major security announcements verified in April: Heartbleed, we use our scanning tools and have verified that we have no exposure to this issue.

3. No down time in messaging, payroll/HR/Finance systems.

4. Moved 250 separate pieces of code into production across various systems.

5. Completed IT installation at new facility X.

6. Etc.

Give them numbers that don't mean a lot, but show that stuff is happening.

Comment: I have a number of them. (Score 2) 114

by attemptedgoalie (#46493505) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Best Management Interface On an IT Appliance?

NetApp

- Command Line in cDOT is pretty useful, I script a ton of things due to this.
- OnCommand System Manager has problems, it even lost functionality in the move from the non clustered OnTap to clustered OnTap. (easy to fix on their end, just a lack of attention to detail) But when you have 30+ filers across a dozen sites, it's all well organized. I'd like to see better performance, but it does 90% of what I need.
- The old FilerView worked for a small shop, but having all filers in the same interface is mandatory when you have as many as we do.

Isilon
- The web interface is pretty in OneFS7, but working with fileshares is kind of icky. When you have something that scales to 20-40PB, you'll have a few fileshares. And every time I have to work with one, it's not a great experience.

Violin
- My old 3000 series had an excellent interface, but it's limited since it's straight SAN, no CIFS/NFS. But fully HTML5, fully rearrangeable.
- The 6000 series interface is supposed to be a tremendous upgrade. I have one in a box waiting for me to get to our DR site to light it up, so hopefully soon I'll know more. But this has been my favorite interface so far.

Nimble
- I don't use this one weekly, a different admin works on it, but it seems pretty straight forward.

DataDomain
- Same as above. It works. Nothing to write home about.

FusionIO
- Big whoop. We're actually going to put Pernix in front of our FusionIO cards and stop using their interface as Pernix has so much better functionality and integration with vCenter.

PureStorage
- I don't own this, we are about to do a POC. But it seems pretty nice from the sales pitch/demos.

If you want to see a decent layout, NetApp's onCommand System Manager does a good job.

If you want to see excellent non-Adobe flash functionality, Violin.

Hope that's useful.

Comment: Because he's in Omaha. (Score 1) 390

by attemptedgoalie (#46422597) Attached to: Bitcoin Inventor Satoshi Nakamoto Outed By Newsweek

There's like 40 people there, so who's going to jump him?

OK, seriously though, he's loved in Nebraska. I love Cherry Coke. It's my only vice. I've lived in a lot of places, but never could get Cherry Coke in a soda fountain/McDonald's/whatever.

While in Omaha/Lincoln, I was able to get it everywhere. Because Warren might drive through.

Comment: How soon before your video is used to locate me? (Score 1) 921

by attemptedgoalie (#46359415) Attached to: Woman Attacked In San Francisco Bar For Wearing Google Glass

How soon before your video capture of me is online, and can be found via an image search?

I may not have the expectation of privacy from these things and other cameras, but surveillance cameras aren't posting their content online. These things (Glass/Cellcams) are designed for that.

In the past somebody could say they thought they saw me somewhere. Proper authorities could take that info and request surveillance from the site.

Now, somebody doesn't care about who they're recording, and I'm in the background. Now I'm tagged forever in that geolocation at that time. I'm not cool with that. In the past that was info down the memory hole. Now it's there forever, and I have no control over it.

Comment: We shouldn't waste our topsoil and water for cars. (Score 1) 314

by attemptedgoalie (#45718211) Attached to: Lawmakers Out To Kill the Corn-Based Ethanol Mandate

Every dime "invested" in ethanol from corn/soy should be redirected into battery technology.

If we could put a minor hybrid assist in every car that provides say 5 miles on electric, it would improve efficiency for at least all the idle time at stoplights and such.

Get a decent transmission/battery for school buses, mail trucks, and other constantly running vehicles and knock off an additional chunk of wasted fuel.

Comment: Not so fast. (Score 2) 243

by attemptedgoalie (#45345685) Attached to: HP's NonStop Servers Go x86, Countdown To Itanium Extinction Begins

Until there is a supported COBOL environment in Linux, HP-UX on Itanium will be around for a long time.

I work in the power industry, and we use some very specific applications that are only available on HP-UX and AIX. HP-UX is by far their largest install base.

These apps are used by the power plants/coal mines for everything. As you'd expect, there are very few applications that are certified for use by the power industry that meet the regulations. The one we use will begin supporting LDAP instead of NIS next year.

There's no incentive for new players in this software market due to the small number of potential customers and the massive trust curve they'd have to meet to make somebody switch.

We're one of the reasons there's a pretty long road map for Itaniums and HP-UX.

Comment: Teach them *about* Unix, Cobol, Oracle and SAP (Score 1, Insightful) 121

by attemptedgoalie (#44701575) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Hands-On Activity For IT Career Fair

There are a million web people.

If you can dig in and work your way into a position that supports and codes for these kinds of environments, you're likely to have a job for 40 years.

Yes, mobile devices are shiny.

But you need big telecom, big transaction processing and big power to make that happen. And that happens on big systems.

I know my department has a number of DBAs/developers that will be retiring over the next 5-10 years. There are no competitors for our business systems due to the regulatory framework, so it will be maintenance and upgrades. Maybe a migration from Oracle to SAP and back, depending on the management regime.

Something to throw out there.

Privacy

Public Facial Recognition Is Making Gains In Surveillance 128

Posted by samzenpus
from the I-see-you dept.
dryriver writes in with a link to a Times story about the U.S. government's capabilities when it comes to facial recognition. "The federal government is making progress on developing a surveillance system that would pair computers with video cameras to scan crowds and automatically identify people by their faces, according to newly disclosed documents and interviews with researchers working on the project. The Department of Homeland Security tested a crowd-scanning project called the Biometric Optical Surveillance System — or BOSS — last fall after two years of government-financed development. Although the system is not ready for use, researchers say they are making significant advances. That alarms privacy advocates, who say that now is the time for the government to establish oversight rules and limits on how it will someday be used. There have been stabs for over a decade at building a system that would help match faces in a crowd with names on a watch list — whether in searching for terrorism suspects at high-profile events like a presidential inaugural parade, looking for criminal fugitives in places like Times Square or identifying card cheats in crowded casinos."

Comment: Exactly what I do. (Score 1) 458

by attemptedgoalie (#44623435) Attached to: My SSID Is...

It is polite to advertise that you're using RFspace.

Then if my neighbors just can't get theirs working, they know at least the first person to ask about which channel not to use on theirs.

I have enough other security features on mine to keep the normal riffraff out.

If somebody wants in, they'll get in, but they'll stick out pretty badly in my neighborhood. "Wonder why there's a doughnut truck out front with a satellite dish on top"

Comment: Re:Had a bicyclist blow through a red-light today (Score 1) 413

by attemptedgoalie (#44232511) Attached to: Lead Developer of Yum Killed In Hit-and-run

If a car blows through an intersection, and a cop sees it, it's ticket-time, and probably an arrest.

if a bike blows through an intersection, and a cop sees it, I doubt they'd expend the effort to track the bicyclist down.

I didn't say that all cyclists are bad. I said this one was.

Comment: Had a bicyclist blow through a red-light today (Score 1, Insightful) 413

by attemptedgoalie (#44231795) Attached to: Lead Developer of Yum Killed In Hit-and-run

All the cars stopped. The people walking in the crosswalk were nearly drilled by some jerk on his bike. Just kept riding, then rode through the next red light.

They want full access to the roads, taking a whole lane? Fine. Then they need to meet all of the same rules we do.
- No rolling red lights.
- No cutting between cars in their lanes.
- Turn signals
- Etc.

If you fail to plan, plan to fail.

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