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Comment: Apple does this (Score 1) 157

by Attila Szegedi (#48432581) Attached to: Greenwald Advises Market-Based Solution To Mass Surveillance
Apple seems to be doing this. They don't benefit anything from tracking their customers. Unlike, say, Google or Facebook who tracks their users for ads, Apple sells devices and as of late is consciously distinguishing itself with attention to privacy. To think about just few things:
  • iOS security whitepaper describes how is iOS and related technologies hardened against attacks. iMessage specifically is fully end-to-end encrypted with Apple never being in possession of messages' cleartext or the keys to decipher them.
  • Data on devices with iOS 8 on them not being accessible even by Apple. FBI and DoJ are up in arms about this and resorting to "think of the children" by scaring us how Apple devices will now be the choice of pedophiles and kidnapers. (To be honest, this ain't an Apple exclusive, as Google now provides this functionality in Android, so at least some Android devices are safe from being broken into.) Just be sure to disable unlock-with-fingerprint.
  • Safari on both OS X and iOS having the option to use non-user-tracking service DuckDuckGo as the search engine (I have set it up as the search engine on all my machines).

There are other measures; detailed privacy policy is found at https://www.apple.com/privacy/ and its subpages. For a while, a link to this page was prominently featured on Apple's front page. They're serious about it.
So yeah, if there's a significant market value in providing privacy-conscious products (that is, consumers recognize its value), then companies will react accordingly. Clearly, it ain't a full solution, but it'll be a significant force in tilting back the playing field somewhat.

Comment: Re:Buyer Beware (Score 1) 473

by Attila Szegedi (#48415981) Attached to: Elite: Dangerous Dumps Offline Single-Player
Can you give me pointers where I can read more about this movie-production scam? I found this fascinating and would love to read more about the history. It's impossible to search for "movie scam" etc. because all I get is pages about movies depicting scams and cons why does that have to be such a beloved topic in storytelling, right? (Don't even get me started on "movie con", 'cause that only gives me movie-related conventions.)

Comment: Sales != Marketing (Score 1) 258

by Attila Szegedi (#47570197) Attached to: Is the App Store Broken?
I think the problem here is that people expect that App Store will do marketing for them. Well, it does, in form of the top lists, but they shouldn't really rely on it. What App Store is for is sales: a venue for people to buy your app, when they already know they want it. It is poor for marketing (making people aware of your app and wanting to buy it); you should handle that externally. It's not just an App Store issue either, although it's probably most prominent example - seller marketplaces like Etsy etc. are also exhibiting the problem, but they too can only be considered to be solutions to a sales problem, not a marketing problem.

He: Let's end it all, bequeathin' our brains to science. She: What?!? Science got enough trouble with their OWN brains. -- Walt Kelly

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