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Submission + - NASA satellite sees black hole belching out hundred million degree X-rays

The Bad Astronomer writes: "NASA's NuSTAR satellite, designed to detect cosmic X-rays, detected a flare of high-energy emission coming from the Milky Way galaxy's central supermassive black hole. The X-rays were the dying gasp of a small gas cloud being torn apart, heated to a hundred million degrees, and then falling into the black hole itself. Events like this are relatively uncommon, so it's fortunate NuSTAR happened to be observing the black hole when it flared."

Submission + - Google Street View Offers Look Inside Data Center (

jfruh writes: "Google Maps has started to offer wayfinding help inside buildings, but in Google's own buildings they can go one better. Street View gives you a peek at some of the odd things inside the search giant's new North Carolina data center, including the snack center, little Android mascots, and what appears to be an Imperial Stormtrooper gaurding a server room."

Submission + - US Supreme Court weighs on on Warrantless GPS Trac (

asylumx writes: We've been following this story on Slashdot for a while now, well the US Supreme Court on Monday ruled unanimously that the police violated the Constitution when they placed a Global Positioning System tracking device on a suspect’s car and monitored its movements for 28 days. While the vote that the tracking was illegal is unanimous, there is some disagreement whether it simply constitutes a search (which should require a warrant under the 4th amendment) or if it was a breach of reasonable expectation of privacy. The latter seems to imply that GPS Tracking without a warrant is sometimes legal.

Submission + - Megaupload's Plan to KO the RIAA (

redletterdave writes: "While prosecutors and the FBI believe earned most of its $175 million in revenue from copyright infringement, a new report has surfaced, which may explain why Megaupload was really shut down. It has to do with a Megaupload venture called MegaBox, and the greediness of the Recording Industry Association of America. In mid-December 2011, roughly four weeks before Megaupload was shuttered by the FBI, the file-sharing site announced a new cloud-based music locker similar to iTunes and Google Music, which integrates a download store, a music player and a DIY artist service, collectively called MegaBox. Unlike other music services that charge artists, Schmitz's idea was to actually pay artists, even for free downloads, and to allow artists to keep 90 percent of their earnings. At the time of the announcement, Megaupload was embroiled in a battle with Universal Music Group, one of the "Big 5" music labels that represents about one-third of the U.S. music market."

And on the seventh day, He exited from append mode.