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Comment: Re:Too much good content is deleted at Wikipedia. (Score 1) 106

by insanecarbonbasedlif (#47724993) Attached to: Latest Wikipedia Uproar Over 'Superprotection'

I quickly found out that the notability idiots over at Wikipedia have repeatedly chosen to target it for elimination.

They've been doing this for years, and long ago burned out my interest in contributing. I've seen 3 pages I helped create/curate get deleted. Happily 2 of the three eventually were re-created by others a year or two later, but a lot of work was destroyed. Let them have their "The free encyclopedia that anyone can edit" slogan - I'll continue to be a parasite reading without contributing unless they clean up their practices to prevent the destruction of good articles.

Comment: Re:"Great minds think alike"... apk (Score 1) 172

by metlin (#47722387) Attached to: Professor Steve Ballmer Will Teach At Two Universities This Year

I would characterize those areas as IT and software engineering, and not necessarily Computer Science.

I would perhaps state that some areas of computing (e.g., systems design, architecture) are better grouped under software engineering, given their nature.

I almost feel that there needs a distinction between software engineering and computer science. To paraphrase David Parnas, computer science studies the properties of computation in general while software engineering is the design of specific computations to achieve practical goals.

Muddling the two disciplines causes heartache because you have people who are great at designing software, but cannot grok advanced math; and on the other hand, you potentially limit your solutions to what's within the realm of current applicability, without exploring other possibilities (e..g, reinventing new algorithms for quantum computation).

Comment: Re:"Great minds think alike"... apk (Score 1) 172

by metlin (#47722065) Attached to: Professor Steve Ballmer Will Teach At Two Universities This Year

I would add a nuance to your point and state that real world experience matters in IT, but not in CS.

Computer Science is more about algorithms, systems architecture, and a lot of math. I did very little programming when I did CS in grad school and a whole lot of pretty awesome math (computational complexity, graphics, optimizations etc). Not sure about undergrad, since I did ECE, which, once again, was a whole lot of math (DSP, control systems, engineering electromagnetics, circuit theory, VLSI etc).

In any event, real-world relevance is more important to IT than it is to CS. I would say that it is however somewhat important in engineering, which, once again, is a professional degree.

Comment: Re:Moisture? (Score 1) 61

by JWSmythe (#47720067) Attached to: The Data Dome: A Server Farm In a Geodesic Dome

since there is no air conditioning, you don't have a condensation problem

No, it's not HVAC induced condensation. Meteorologists call it the dew point.

Right at this moment, the temp is 53.3F with a relative humidity of 78%. The dew point is 47F.

You're suppose to run a datacenter between 40% to 60% relative humidity. Without a system in place to dry the air, they're asking for corrosion on parts.

You can't say computers are corrosion proof either. When I worked in a computer store, we had computers come in all the time that were in houses with no HVAC, so they were exposed to outdoor humidity.

I left some old gear in a friends garage for a while. One of the units was a used Catalyst 5000, with cards I didn't really care about. When I put it in the garage, it was in functional condition.

I decided to bring it back up to play with. There was corrosion on the line card handles, and I'm sure corrosion inside. Nothing looked bright and clean. There was visible corrosion on the cat5 pins (for the cat5 ports). When I took it out, it barely worked with lots of errors. Reseating the cards didn't help at all. I don't know (or care) which parts went bad, I sent it off for electronic scrap recycling.

Someone's going to be really pissed off when they spent a fortune on servers that have to be trashed because they stop working properly.

There are other parts machines in the garage too. I only go to them for fans, power supplies, etc. I had already pulled out all the memory and CPUs. Sometimes they still work. Sometimes they don't.

Specs have some wild numbers on them. Some say they operate in 10% to 90% humidity. Sure, they *can* run in it for a while. They aren't expected to survive in that kind of temperature indefinitely. I've seen some specs that say they'll operate over 120F. Sure, for a very short time. I had one place argue with me because the spec showed wild numbers, but they were already experiencing hardware failures for operating servers in an uncooled server room (the HVAC broke, and they didn't want to fix it).

Comment: Re:Is he a scientist? (Score 3, Informative) 172

by metlin (#47719907) Attached to: Professor Steve Ballmer Will Teach At Two Universities This Year

B-schools often hire people who are not in academia per se, but have rich real world experience in solving business problems.

For instance, you will often find senior partners from top consulting firms teaching classes, because they bring to bear not just academic knowledge but also practical experience.

People who do their MBA are not there to just learn the latest and greatest management technique from academia -- they also seek to apply that to the real world.

And this is not just true for MBAs -- it is also true for law schools, medical schools, and many other professional degrees. You'll find former judges and lawyers teaching classes, and you'll find doctors and surgeons with real world experience tempering your academic knowledge with their real world experience.

Public policy is another area where you former civil servants often teaching classes.

Comment: They are a bit nutty.... (Score 2) 135

by Lumpy (#47719109) Attached to: How Argonne National Lab Will Make Electric Cars Cheaper

The battery pack is not the bulk of the price of an electric car. It's all the other bits.
So it is not going to drive down the price, not by any reasonable amount.

What is needed is a single company making the motors and standardization. If the Govt demanded that all cars follow a standard motor design then suddenly costs will drop. Ford,GM,Toyota,Honda are NOT going to standardize unless forced to. And prices will not drop until there is a standard that is interchangeable.

Comment: Re:Big Data (Score 2) 179

by JWSmythe (#47717263) Attached to: Netflix CEO On Net Neutrality: Large ISPs Are the Problem

Technically, it's just where you're buying the connection. Netflix are already at a shitload of peerings.

AS2096 - 170 peers - http://bgp.he.net/AS2906
AS40027 - dead since Feb 23, 2012 - http://bgp.he.net/AS40027
AS55095 - 2 BGP peers - http://bgp.he.net/AS55095

So now I'm even more confused to WTF they're bitching about.

try again

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