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Comment Re:Technically, probably not a good move to dodge (Score 1) 153 153

True, but, meh? Nobody outside the USA knew what the attacks are, or if they were actually attacked. Nobody's posted any pictures of implants they've found either.

Also:
You left out quoting the top part where I was basically saying in absence of a kangaroo court... then this.

Comment Technically, probably not a good move to dodge NSA (Score 5, Insightful) 153 153

If we pretend that laws mean something...

then they would be *safer* here in the USA where the NSA is not allowed to spy on them, because it's
A: in the USA (FBI territory, right?)
B: whoever it is would need a warrant.

Now, the NSA can do whatever they want, because they're completely
A: outside of the USA
B: totally foreign SIGINT

Comment Having a hard time distinguishing from eugenics (Score 2) 199 199

If you are going to manually select for better mitochondrial DNA, what's the difference between that and manually selecting every other bit of DNA.

Sure, we select DNA when we choose a mate, but when you're twiddling with it below the cellular level what's keeping people from custom babies? Allowing *just* this will permit for a race of super men, bred for their superior metabolism by simply selecting better mitochondria.

"But this is for fixing a specific disease." Sure, but that doesn't make the results any different. You engineered a "better" baby. Why can't anyone else do that. What makes you and your broken DNA special? I want to engineer out acne & BRCA mutations. Oh, too bad for you, can't pay for custom baby fixing and now your baby is stuck with Alzheimer's. If we're just "fixing" things with babies, red hair is a "defect", let's remove that and replace it with blonde...

IMO, allowing this is a slippery slope.

Comment Amusingly, this also got posted today (Score 1) 175 175

Can Students Have Too Much Tech?

"Students who gain access to a home computer between the 5th and 8th grades tend to witness a persistent decline in reading and math scores," the economists wrote, adding that license to surf the Internet was also linked to lower grades in younger children.

Fools ignore complexity. Pragmatists suffer it. Some can avoid it. Geniuses remove it. -- Perlis's Programming Proverb #58, SIGPLAN Notices, Sept. 1982

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