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The First Photograph of a Human 138

wiredog writes "The Atlantic has a brief piece on what is likely to be the first photograph (a daguerreotype) showing a human. From the article: 'In September, Krulwich posted a set of daguerreotypes taken by Charles Fontayne and William Porter in Cincinnati 162 years ago, on September 24, 1848. Krulwich was celebrating the work of the George Eastman House in association with the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County. Using visible-light microscopy, the George Eastman House scanned several plates depicting the Cincinnati Waterfront so that scholars could zoom in and study the never-before-seen details.'"

Convicted NY Drunk Drivers Need Ignition Interlocks 911

pickens writes "Starting yesterday in New York state, anyone sentenced for felony or misdemeanor DWI, whether a first-time or repeat offender, will have to install an ignition interlock in any vehicle they own or operate. The interlock contains a breath-checking unit that keeps the car from starting if the offender's blood-alcohol level registers 0.025 or higher, a little less than one-third of the legal limit. 'The addition of ignition interlocks will save lives in New York state,' says State Probation Director Robert Maccarone, who led the team that wrote the regulation. 'It's been proven in other states. New Mexico realized a 37 percent reduction in DWI recidivism.' Whether that will be enough to persuade more people to take a cab or find a designated driver is unknown. 'It's one more thing to make people think, it may help — it may keep a few people from getting behind the wheel,' says Onondaga County Sheriff Kevin Walsh."

The Sun's 'Quiet Period' Explained 167

Arvisp writes with this excerpt from the BBC: "Solar physicists may have discovered why the Sun recently experienced a prolonged period of weak activity. The most recent so-called 'solar minimum' occurred in December 2008. Its drawn-out nature extended the total length of the last solar cycle — the repeating cycle of the Sun's activity — to 12.6 years, making it the longest in almost 200 years. The new research suggests that the longer-than-expected period of weak activity may have been linked to changes in the way a hot soup of charged particles called plasma circulated in the Sun."

75% Use Same Password For Social Media & Email 278

wiredmikey writes "Over 250,000 user names, email addresses, and passwords used for social networking sites can easily be found online. A study of the data collected showed that 75 percent of social networking username and password samples collected online were identical to those used for email accounts. The password data was gathered from blogs, torrents, online collaboration services and other sources. It was found that 43 percent of the data was leaked from online collaboration tools while 21 percent of data was leaked from blog postings. Meanwhile, torrents and users of other social hubs were responsible for leaking 10 percent and 18 percent of user data respectively...."

Comment Re:Things Mature (Score 1, Interesting) 646

IE might be losing marketshare, but even IE has features that Firefox doesn't. For example, process separation between tabs. And IE9 is quickly bringing the JS performance and standards compliance up to par with Firefox.

I mean, feel free to hate Microsoft, but there has to be something wrong at Mozilla if even Microsoft's slow, super-careful, backwards-compatible development methods are caught up so quickly.

Comment My take as an old time firefox user ... (Score 5, Interesting) 646

I think that the problem is actually that the higher firefox devs. seem to be focused on looking like chrome/opera... and keep on introducing new features that break the rest of the browser.
People don't move to chrome because of the ui(well okay, some do, most I know didn't), they moved because it was faster and less buggy.

What firefox needs is optimization/cleaning, not new features.

I will personally stay with the fox until chrome or opera allow for both real gui modification(which both opera and chrome lack) and extensions(chrome has that, or at least starting to pick up).v

Comment OK I RTFA and... (Score 2, Insightful) 220

This guy is a quack. The entire article sounds like the ramblings of a paranoid schizophrenic that has a bit of technical knowledge. He thought some random Chinese restaurant he had lunch in was actually a front for corporate espionage simply because they had "black duck eggs" on the menu. Seriously. That was his one and only reason. He goes on to accuse the Chinese of planting spies in oil companies and Google specifically. I hope he was actually quoted out of context or we've got some serious mental patients for "security experts".

Comment Re:Open Source Warning (Score 1) 154

A Facebook page may make you unemployable

Seriously, if some dumbarse business won't employ you because they found something on your Facebook page, they would be a god-awful place to work anyway. There will be plenty of better employers out there who will employ you no matter what's on your page, and they will be far more pleasant places to work.

Comment Re:Hope they don't lose the key to the door (Score 2, Interesting) 161

I remember reading in some sci fi book about a vault that was sealed by attaching a chunk of a long-lived radioisotope to the back of a tight fitting steel door such that the heat released caused the door to expand and jam tightly into the frame. The idea was that it could only be opened by a fairly advanced civilisation that was capable of artificial refrigeration, plus of course able to recognise what was needed. I always found that an intriguing idea although anyone sufficiently determined could probably get in anyway

Don't suppose anyone knows what book that was? I've been trying to find it for years now.

Comment Re:Yay! finally some accountability for all those (Score 1) 205

If you are a hobbyist, you should not sell your software. Leave it for the pro's

I worked as an AP for many years with no 'meaningful' tertiary qualifications and started my programming as a hobbyist back in the days of 2650 and S-100. I worked with many people back then who would be called 'hobbyists' by self promoting professionals who aren't worthy to wash the majority of hobbyist's grubby feet. The one thing in any working situation we feared was the arrival of some gung-ho fresh out of Uni idiot with professional qualifications because they didn't have a fscking clue and felt that they where the solution to every IT problem that had evr existed. Hobbyists in garages could perform miracles before the professionals got involved. Ask the majority of IT professionals what JNZ means and they will most likely think it's a bank in Jordan.
Like many IT 'hobbyists' of that era I am glad to now be out of that scene completely living a minimalist life with my wife, dog, and pet chicken.

The trouble with doing something right the first time is that nobody appreciates how difficult it was.