Become a fan of Slashdot on Facebook

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Submission + - This Heat-Responsive Coating Could Keep Lithium-Ion Batteries From Catching Fire (acs.org)

MTorrice writes: Lithium-ion batteries, which power devices including smartphones, electric cars, and hoverboards, rarely catch fire. Industry experts put the figure at less than 1 fire per 10 million battery cells, not counting battery abuse tests. Yet the batteries are used so widely and pack so much energy that researchers still strive to prevent these unlikely failures by coming up with ever more reliable safety features.

When coated onto a lithium-ion battery electrode, a new composite material protects the battery from bursting into flames if it is overcharged or develops an electrical short. The material could lead to safer designs of Li-ion and other types of batteries.

Submission + - Kentucky Bill: Wait an Hour Before Posting Injuries To Social Media (kentucky.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The Kentucky state representative is developing an unusual piece of legislation. It would impose a delay on people posting about an event on social media if the event resulted in serious injury. Users caught violating this law would face fines ranging from $20-$100, and it wouldn't restrict media, victims, or first responders — just bystanders. Representative John Carney says, "It’s purely my intent to get a discussion going out there, asking people to be more respectful about what they put on social media. We’ve had some incidents, including one in my community, and I’d hate for anyone to learn about the loss of a loved one through social media." Opponents of the bill point out the difficulty in determining who qualifies as "media" in the age of social networks, not to mention the potential conflict with the First Amendment. Carney recognizes the difficulty, and says he doesn't intend to push the bill immediately, but notes that he's trying to solve a real problem. Tiger Robinson, a local public safety director, said, "There have been times we’ve been pulling bodies out of cars and these people are standing there, snapping pictures on their phones to post on Facebook. It’s just not right."

Submission + - Bitcoin Trader Agrees to Work For Police In Plea Agreement

An anonymous reader writes: Florida Bitcoin trader Pascal Reid who was arrested in a February 2014 sting operation as part of his plea agreement promised to carry out 20 sessions of law enforcement training in Bitcoin as well as serve as a consultant in criminal cases involving Bitcoin. This is in addition to 90 days in jail with credit for time served and a $500 reimbursement to the State of Florida for the expense of prosecuting him. Qntra has a write up on the case and the full text of the draft plea agreement.

Submission + - Chemical evidence shows the Nazis weren't at all close to having the bomb (forbes.com)

TheAlexKnapp writes: The Nazis winning World War II by getting the bomb first is a staple of alt-history and it's the reason why James T. Kirk lost the love of his life, Edith Keeler. Einstein also noted possible German efforts to build one in his letter to FDR urging the U.S. develop an atomic weapon. But it turns out there really wasn't a race to build a bomb at all. Materials from Germany's atomic weapons program have been studied by an international team of researchers, who determined that Germany never achieved a self-sustaining nuclear chain reaction — something that Fermi and his colleagues had accomplished in 1942 — which was a key step to actually building an atomic weapon. This chemical evidence supports other historical accounts that the German atomic program never achieved this result.

Submission + - Bypass the Android Lollipop lockscreen by entering a really long password (betanews.com)

Mark Wilson writes: A lengthy password is a good thing, right? For some Android users running Lollipop, however, it may be possible to bypass the lockscreen simply by entering a password that is incredibly long. Copy and paste a lengthy string into the password field, and it is possible to crash the lockscreen and gain access to the phone or tablet.

While the vulnerability is worrying, it is not something that can be exploited remotely — it is necessary to have physical access to the phone. The bug was discovered by security researchers at Texas University and while a patch has been issued for Nexus devices, other handsets remain vulnerable.

John Gordon from the university reveals that it is possible to use the Emergency Call feature that can be accessed from the lockscreen to generate lengthy strings of text that ultimately provide unrestricted access without knowing the correct password.

Submission + - Snowden statue in NY (marketwatch.com)

An anonymous reader writes: A statue of Snowden showed up in Brooklyn. As quickly as it showed up, it was even more quickly removed. Apart from this, the bust was also hidden by a blue tarp so that New Yorkers do not get any ideas.
  Still, it is nice to see civil disobedience did not completely die in this nation.

Submission + - Silk Road 2.0 Deputy Arrested

An anonymous reader writes: With the Ulbricht trial ongoing in a case over the original Silk Road, Homeland Security agents have made another arrest in the Silk Road 2.0 a more than two and a half months after the site was shut down. This time they arrested Defcon's deputy who went by the moniker "DoctorClu."

Submission + - Nanobots Deliver Medical Payload in Living Creature for the First Time (gizmag.com)

Zothecula writes: Researchers working at the University of California, San Diego have claimed a world first in proving that artificial, microscopic machines can travel inside a living creature and deliver their medicinal load without any detrimental effects. Using micro-motor powered nanobots propelled by gas bubbles made from a reaction with the contents of the stomach in which they were deposited, these miniature machines have been successfully deployed in the body of a live mouse.

Submission + - Silk Road Prosecutor Preet Bharara: Keep Politics Out of Ulbricht Defense

An anonymous reader writes: Prosecutors in the Silk Proad case lead by Preet Bharara are seeking to ban the presentation of any political ideas by the defense. This is in spite of that fact that if the Silk Road operator the Dread Pirate Roberts can be established lawfully in court to be Ulbricht, nearly all of the writings available to establish Mens Rea, or culpable criminal mind set, appear to be of a political character.

Submission + - Spanish CyberSquat Raided in "Counter-Terror" Operation

MrBingoBoingo writes: An anarchist center in Spain at Kasa de la Muntanya associated with techo libertarian projects was raided under the guise of of "Counter-Terrorism" operation. The squat had been continually occupied since 1989 and served as a social senter for the local community in addition to serving as a haven to technological and libertarian projects.

Submission + - Electric eel shocks like a Taser (vanderbilt.edu)

Science_afficionado writes: After a nine month study, a Vanderbilt biologist has determined that the electric eel emits series of millisecond, high-voltage pulses to paralyze its prey just before it attacks. The high-voltage pulses cause the motor neurons in its target to violently contract, leaving it temporarily immobilized in the same fashion as the high-voltage pulses produced by a Taser. He documented this effect using high-speed video. The eel, which is nocturnal and has very poor eyesight, also uses closely spaced pairs of high-voltage pulses when hunting for hidden prey. He determined that the pulses cause the prey's body to twitch which produces water movements that the eel uses to locate its position even when it's hidden from view.

Slashdot Top Deals

The 11 is for people with the pride of a 10 and the pocketbook of an 8. -- R.B. Greenberg [referring to PDPs?]

Working...