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Comment: In before "$3,300 WTF?!" (Score 3, Informative) 42

by arielCo (#47452979) Attached to: AMD FirePro W9100 16GB Workstation GPU Put To the Test

From TFA:

Understanding the Workstation Market:

The first thing we need to talk about is the difference between workstation and consumer GPUs. The GPUs themselves are essentially identical -- NVIDIA's Quadro K6000 is based on GK104 (Kepler) the older Quadro 6000 is a GF100 (Fermi)-based chip, the W9000 uses the same GCN core that powers the HD 7970/R9 280X, and today's W9100 is essentially identical to the Hawaii XT core inside the R9 290X. What sets these workstation cards aside are the amount of RAM they carry (typically 2-3x as much as a consumer card), their validation cycles (workstation GPU cores are hammered on far more than the consumer equivalents) and the amount of backend vendor support and optimization that AMD and NVIDIA both perform.

This optimization process and long-term vendor partnership is what distinguishes the workstation market from the consumer space and the need to pay for some of those development costs is part of why workstation cards tend to cost so much more than their consumer equivalents.

Comment: Re:what? (Score 3, Informative) 42

by arielCo (#47452953) Attached to: AMD FirePro W9100 16GB Workstation GPU Put To the Test

Understanding the Workstation Market:

The first thing we need to talk about is the difference between workstation and consumer GPUs. The GPUs themselves are essentially identical -- NVIDIA's Quadro K6000 is based on GK104 (Kepler) the older Quadro 6000 is a GF100 (Fermi)-based chip, the W9000 uses the same GCN core that powers the HD 7970/R9 280X, and today's W9100 is essentially identical to the Hawaii XT core inside the R9 290X. What sets these workstation cards aside are the amount of RAM they carry (typically 2-3x as much as a consumer card), their validation cycles (workstation GPU cores are hammered on far more than the consumer equivalents) and the amount of backend vendor support and optimization that AMD and NVIDIA both perform.

This optimization process and long-term vendor partnership is what distinguishes the workstation market from the consumer space and the need to pay for some of those development costs is part of why workstation cards tend to cost so much more than their consumer equivalents.

From TFA.

Comment: Coanda effect? (Score 1) 204

by arielCo (#47443297) Attached to: Rocket Scientist Designs "Flare" Pot That Cooks Food 40% Faster

It looks like there's more to it than increased surface area - the Coand effect may be at work here, making the plumes of hot gas creep along the "trenches" rather than flare out. There's a video where it kind of shows what I mean at (1'25").

Then again, this may be just a case of increased area for heat transfer. I'm not a rocket engineer.

Comment: Re: A good thing (Score 1) 154

by arielCo (#47392607) Attached to: Oklahoma's Earthquakes Linked To Fracking

I learned after posting that comment that some of the quakes happened in places without a significant seismic history. And thar the fracking may have caused a redistribution of stresses by weakening the gas bearing strata. (Which is not the same as crowing "You said you weren't causing quakes and now you can! Which is it, huh? Huh?")

The fun part will be taking Big Oil to court. How well have the areas where they operate been monitored?

Comment: Re: A good thing (Score 1) 154

by arielCo (#47390173) Attached to: Oklahoma's Earthquakes Linked To Fracking

I thought all quakes dissipated energy reducing the total stress, but this may still be true while increasing concentration elsewhere as you suggest. Another reply to my comment says that the fractured layer isn't as strong as before, resulting in new shifts and accomodation in faults that were stable. What do you think?

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