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Comment Re:Because there is much need at the middle ground (Score 0) 511

No - there are interviews out there with members of the actual Twitter development team that specifically state they ditched Ruby because it couldn't scale.

It was nothing to do with the database. Revisionist history much?

Let me guess, you use Ruby and don't like the fact that it might not be the be-all and end-all?

Comment Re:What's the point? (Score 0) 511

Why do shops like Twitter, Ebay, Google use Java so heavily then? They run the highest volume websites in the world. Kind of blows your argument about using ASM or C out of the water. If Java was slow then they wouldn't have used it. Java is slow, if you don't have a clue what you're doing. I assume thats why you think its slow.

Comment Re:We can thank corporate America (Score 0) 282

I don't know what sort of projects you've worked on, but an enterprise level project requires a massive understanding of the business, its processes and its clients. You cannot pick that up in a month - 18 months would be about right, to get the minimum understanding of those. On the other hand, if you are just there to build web pages, or desktop GUIs, then sure, you could become productive in a month - but you're not going to be adding value to the company.

Comment Re:Families come first (Score 0) 370

I didn't read your whole comment, but you are misunderstanding what college/university education is for - its not to teach a trade, its to teach a mind how to critically think and solve problems in the programming domain, and how to document them.

No matter what you do at college, you are always going to take a minimum of 2 years to become a productive asset in the industry - there is no way to shortcut that process.

Comment Re:Administrators (Score 0) 538

You are correct in some regards, but you also fail to mention the dozens of absolutely useless degrees that people sign up for that clearly have no job prospects whatsoever at the end, yet they still pursue them. Where I come from (a small country, not the US), there are 20 times the number of graduates each year in Psychology as there are in Computer Science, despite there being barely any jobs in the former, and tens of thousands of unfilled jobs in the latter. There are also thousands of graduates a year with brilliant degrees like Women and Gender Studies, Anthropology, Classical Studies, Art History, Social Studies, Asian Studies, Pacific Studies etc that go into their degree knowing there aren't any jobs in that field at all in our country, and then when they finish up all they can get is basic retail work and they sit around complaining that they don't get paid enough.

"Falling in love makes smoking pot all day look like the ultimate in restraint." -- Dave Sim, author of Cerebrus.