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Comment: Re:Godwined before it even started (Score 2) 205

by Sloppy (#49503273) Attached to: Joseph Goebbels' Estate Sues Publisher Over Diary Excerpt Royalties

But if Goebbels' heirs don't have an exclusive right to the diaries, then what incentive does Goebbels have to write diaries? We must continue to grant and enforce this monopoly, or else Goebbels' lack of return for his hard work will cause him to give up and get a job as a dishwasher. Is that the kind of world you want to live in?!

Comment: Re:vs. a Falcon 9 (Score 1) 61

by Bruce Perens (#49501071) Attached to: Rocket Lab Unveils "Electric" Rocket Engine

They can carry about 110kg to LEO, compared to the Falcon 9's 13150kg. That's 0.84% of the payload capacity. A launch is estimated to cost $4 900 000, compared to the Falcon 9's $61 200 000. That's 8.01%. That means cost per mass to orbit is nearly an order of magnitude worse.

Yes, this is a really small rocket. If you are a government or some other entity that needs to put something small in orbit right away, the USD$5 Million price might not deter you, even though you could potentially launch a lot of small satellites on a Falcon 9 for less.

And it's a missile affordable by most small countries, if your payload can handle the re-entry on its own. Uh-oh. :-)

Comment: Re:YES the must be dicks (Score 1) 261

by Rich0 (#49498677) Attached to: FBI Accuses Researcher of Hacking Plane, Seizes Equipment

It's the other way around buddy. If he builds the tools to pen-test an aircraft system with his own money he is under NO obligation to share that information.

Sure, but that doesn't mean that he's free to use those tools in an operational aircraft.

He can of course mess with an aircraft with the permission of the owner on the ground. Legally he probably can't mess with any aircraft in the air, since that would be a violation of its type certificate (it was certified with one set of software, and he introducing another).

Comment: Re:misdemeanor?? (Score 1) 264

by Rich0 (#49498667) Attached to: Gyrocopter Pilot Appears In Court; Judge Bans Him From D.C.

You can't legally fly within 60nm of the center of DC without taking an online training course. If you want to fly to an airport right on the edge of the restricted area it is probably complicated, but for the most part you just need to stay outside of a certain distance and you're fine. If I were operating anywhere near that area i'd probably request flight following as well - then you're broadcasting a transponder code and talking to somebody who can tell you you're wandering towards trouble before they are scrambling jets.

Isn't that odd how during 9/11 NORAD went some two hours without scrambling a single jet, despite the normal response time measured in minutes they aim for and we have witnessed in every other instance of a flight going so far astray?

Every other instance before or after 9/11? A lot of attitudes changed after 9/11.

However, this wasn't a commercial flight. In general small aircraft can go from anywhere to anywhere and nobody takes notice. The exception is controlled interface and ADIZs, and the SFRA around DC is even more of an exception. Any aircraft that enters that airspace is subject to interception, or possibly even being shot down.

Comment: Re:Open Source implementation of Play Services (Score 1) 239

by Rich0 (#49498603) Attached to: Google Responds To EU Antitrust Claims In Android Blog Post

Google is moving more and more utilities to Play Services, which is not open source.
Play Services is not only about Google-related services, it is also about OAuth for instance.
Unknowing developers rely on Play Services, making their apps incompatible with pure-Android devices.

To solve this problem, an Open Source implementation of Google Play Services is being developed:
http://softwarerecs.stackexcha...

Google really needs to split Play Services.

I get that they want to make the framework updateable without a full OS update. I think that is a great idea. They should make an "Android Frameworks" app and release it as open source. Mandate that it be pre-installed on any device that passes their QA, and recommend that everybody else use it as well. Why wouldn't they - it is FOSS and just makes the device better.

Then limit Play Services to, well, Play Services. It might handle authentication to your Google Account, verify that paid apps are legit, and so on. If you remove it then you might not be able to use your Google account with the device, or use the Play Store, but otherwise Android works just fine. This can be proprietary.

Honestly, though, I'd actually like the Google Account stuff to be FOSS. I should be able to sign into my own server and have contacts/etc sync and backups and all that. It is great that you don't HAVE to use Google's services, but it would be better if you also had the option of rolling your own.

Comment: Re:Awkwardly enough... (Score 1) 264

by Rich0 (#49498219) Attached to: Gyrocopter Pilot Appears In Court; Judge Bans Him From D.C.

He failed to register the LSA. If everyone who did this were locked up for 3 years there would be a lot of harmless aviation enthusiasts in federal prison.

From my experience with regulators from several countries, they tend to not sweat the small stuff until it is obvious that you aren't paying attention to the big stuff. Then they go through everything with a fine-toothed comb and throw the book at you.

The guy flew into the DC SFRA. If the FAA doesn't ruin his life, then everybody and their uncle will be doing it, and then they don't really have a buffer zone in which to shoot down aircraft that are potentially threatening.

The fuel tank issue is a bit like citing somebody for worn wipers in a vehicular homicide investigation. They're just padding the charges.

Comment: Re:Typical Misdirection From White House (Score 1) 264

by Rich0 (#49498197) Attached to: Gyrocopter Pilot Appears In Court; Judge Bans Him From D.C.

Quite the contrary. He sent them a message a full hour in advance, saying that they should expect him.

The White House knew he was coming and expected him

You've got a lot of faith in Uncle Sam if you think the left hand (whomever reads info@barackobama.com) talks to the right hand (FAA, NORAD, USSS, and a few other agencies in the alphabet soup)

Heck, it's not even a Government address, it's BHO's campaign organization's address.

Agree. Can you imagine how much noise those addresses get?

This is a bit like explaining to the IRS that it shouldn't have been a problem that you filed your taxes late, because you told the postal delivery agent that you were running a few days behind when he was dropping off a package.

Comment: Re:misdemeanor?? (Score 1) 264

by Rich0 (#49498181) Attached to: Gyrocopter Pilot Appears In Court; Judge Bans Him From D.C.

Pilot here. Even though this guy clearly did it intentionally, accidentally violating an airspace in a small plane without sophisticated navigation equipment is easier than you would think. Someone does it every once in a while. Don't get me wrong, it's still a big deal, but not a felony. I wouldn't ever fly near the D.C. area out of fear of doing exactly that. The airspace up there is pretty complicated.

You can't legally fly within 60nm of the center of DC without taking an online training course. If you want to fly to an airport right on the edge of the restricted area it is probably complicated, but for the most part you just need to stay outside of a certain distance and you're fine. If I were operating anywhere near that area i'd probably request flight following as well - then you're broadcasting a transponder code and talking to somebody who can tell you you're wandering towards trouble before they are scrambling jets.

Obviously flying IFR is the simplest solution. ATC tells you where to go and you follow the route and you're fine.

But, if you're just buzzing around sightseeing over the white house, then sure, you're going to be in a lot of trouble. They actually have lasers to illuminate aircraft to try to warn them off, so that shooting them down isn't their only recourse.

Comment: Re:Misinformed (Score 2) 125

It won't matter. Initial negative experience will color all future opinions. Apple really screwed the pooch on this one.

Yeah, badly. I mean, they only presold 1,000,000 of them with an average price of around $400. That's $400,000,000 in one single day.

This is version 1.0, which in the open source world would really be version 0.8 or so. It's a beta. Totally new product for Apple, and the people who are lining up to buy them know this.

Give it a few versions and it'll likely be faster and have longer battery life, as well as some very reasonable native apps.

Comment: Re:You Can See (Score 1) 110

Microminiature accelerometers are really cheap and very very light, and you don't have to wait for them to spin up or deal with their mechanical issues. I doubt you will see a gyro used as a sensor any longer.

Similarly, computers make good active stabilization possible and steering your engine to stabilize is a lot lighter than having to add a big rotating mass.

"Oh what wouldn't I give to be spat at in the face..." -- a prisoner in "Life of Brian"

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