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Submission + - 'Connected Televisions/TVs' Still Not Very Connected (npdgroupblog.com) 1

antdude writes: "The National Purchase Diary (NPD) Group Blog reports that "Internet Connected TVs Are Used To Watch TV, And That’s About All — The Internet connected high definition television (HDTV) screen has so far failed to break beyond the bounds of its TV-centric heritage, with little use for the big screen beyond the obligatory video services. But the connection is being used to provide access to a far wider variety of alternative sources for video content. The latest NPD Connected Intelligence Application & Convergence report highlights that nearly six out of ten consumers who own a connected HDTV are accessing Over-the-Top (OTT) video services through the device. Seen on DSL/Broadband Reports."

Submission + - Time Warner Cable patents method for disabling fast-forward function on DVRs (fiercecable.com) 1

antdude writes: "FierceCable reports "Time Warner Cable (NYSE: TWC) has won a U.S. patent for a method for disabling fast-forward and other trick mode functions on digital video recorders.

The patent, which lists Time Warner Cable principal architect Charles Hasek as the inventor, details how the nation's second largest cable MSO may be able prevent viewers from skipping TV commercials contained in programs stored on physical DVRs it deploys in subscriber homes, network-based DVRs and even recording devices subscribers purchase at retail outlets...""


Submission + - Terra Infirma: The rise and fall of quicksand. (slate.com)

Ant writes: "Slate reports how "... quicksand has all but evaporated from American entertainment--rejected even by the genre directors who once found it indispensable... Quicksand once offered filmmakers a simple recipe for excitement: A pool of water, thickened with oatmeal, sprinkled over the top with wine corks. It was, in its purest form, a plot device unburdened by character, motivation, or story..."

Seen on Neatorama."


Submission + - Sixteen/16 secret Lost references in video games. (gamesradar.com)

Ant writes: "This four pages GamesRadar article, with screen shots/captures and embedded video clips, tells its sixteen/"16 secret Lost references in videogames. The mysteries of the island are everywhere... even in your favorite games. Lost is no longer just a show. Lost is a multimedia mythology. So while the television/TV series ends this weekend, its impact on popular culture – the island's hold on our collective imagination – will endure. Just look to videogames for proof. Even though Lost has only been around since late 2004, and even though a single game can take that many years or more to develop, the connection between these two geek hobbies is already surprisingly strong. Hidden references (the numbers, the hatch, polar bears) and clever cameos (Jack, Desmond, Locke) pop up in nearly every genre and on nearly every system. Here are the sixteen/16 we've discovered. How many more are out there? And how many more are yet to come? ..." Seen on Digg."

Submission + - Thousands shun colour television (bbc.co.uk) 1

Ant writes: "BBC News report that "almost 30,000 people across the United Kingdom (UK) still tune into their favourite/favorite programmes/programs on black and white (B&W) television (telly/TV) sets.

The figures were released by TV Licensing to mark the 40th anniversary of the first colour/color transmissions on BBC1 and ITV. The 28,000 black and white (B&W) licence/license holders included 1,950 in Scotland. The figures showed the black and white sets have not yet been consigned to history despite the rise of flat-screens and the iPlayer.

While the figures show there is still life in the oldest TV equipment, BBC statistics show that emerging technologies are changing the way many of us watch TV..."

Seen on Digg."

16.5 feet in the Twilight Zone = 1 Rod Serling